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Swastikas drawn on Polish embassy in Israel

  • Jerusalem (CNN) - Poland's embassy in Tel Aviv was daubed with swastikas on Sunday, a day after Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki caused outrage by claiming Jews were among the perpetrators of the Holocaust.
  • The law, which, which makes it illegal to accuse the Polish nation of complicity in crimes committed by Nazi Germany, including the Holocaust, also bans the use of terms such as "Polish death camps" in relation to Auschwitz and other such camps located in Nazi-occupied Poland.
  • Poland was the center of Ashkenazi Jewry before the Holocaust, with around 3.5 million Jews living in the country before the outbreak of World War II in 1939.
  • According to Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem, between 30,000 and 35,000 Polish Jews were saved with the help of non-Jewish Polish citizens.

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Students mobilize after Florida shooting as victims recover

  • Anthony Borges, 15, was shot five times during the mass shooting at his high school, according to the Broward County Sheriff's Office.
  • In the grim aftermath of the Parkland, Florida, shooting that left classmates hospitalized and 17 people dead, many students who survived the bloodshed say they can no longer endure a cycle of gun violence followed by inaction.
  • As the South Florida community grapples with the aftermath, a 15-year-old teenager was arrested Friday for posting a threat on Instagram to kill people at several Broward County schools.
  • The FBI failed to act on a January 5 tip of information about "Cruz's gun ownership, desire to kill people, erratic behavior and disturbing social media posts, as well as the potential of him conducting a school shooting," the agency said.

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Tillerson pledged to keep up the 'maximum pressure' campaign on North Korea — but offered them a way out

  • Rex Tillerson has signalled willingness to negotiate with Kim Jong Un's regime, but only if they go first.
  • The US has been "using large sticks" by way of sanctions to convince North Korea to negotiate, the Secretary of State told CBS News' "60 Minutes" program in an interview aired on Sunday night.
  • The US Treasury Department and UN Security Council have passed multiple rounds of sanctions on entities, individuals, and companies affiliated with the North Korean regime over the past year.
  • Tillerson's message echoes that of Vice President Mike Pence, who told The Washington Post last week that the US was pursuing a policy of "maximum pressure and engagement at the same time" with Pyongyang.
  • The US is reportedly considering a "bloody nose" strike on North Korea, in which it responds to the next North Korean missile or nuclear test with a limited military strike that would embarrass Kim Jong Un.

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Some people are exploiting the latest Apple bug to crash your iPhone via Twitter

  • Scott Applewhite BI.requireQueue.push({ requireFunc: function () { require( "src\/scripts\/utils\/contentProvider" )( {"providerName":"mi","providerUrl":"www.businessinsider.com\/ajax\/finanzenpost?isPost=true&symbols=AAPL,TWTR&author[]=Edoardo Maggio&vertical=sai&categories[]=apple&categories[]=twitter&categories[]=ios&categories[]=macos&categories[]=tech-uk&views=0","adEnabled":true,"wrapperClass":"markets-insider-post"}, window); }, priority : undefined }); There's an Apple software bug currently affecting iPhones, iPads, and Macs — and some pranksters are taking advantage of it.
  • The bug means a keyboard character from the Indian language Telugu can crash applications as soon as it shows up in a text field.
  • As Mashable first reported, a number of Twitter users are intentionally posting the Telugu character in hope that it will show up in some people's timelines, and crash their device whether they see it intentionally or by accident.
  • The bug is huge, not only because it concerns all of Apple's devices, but also because all versions of current operating systems are at risk.
  • The only safe version is iOS 11.3, which is currently in beta, and it's not clear when Apple plans to release it more broadly.

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There is a good reason why Kate Middleton didn't wear black to the Baftas

  • But while most guests adhered to the "unofficial black dress code" in support of the Time's Up campaign against sexual harassment — Kate Middleton was one of the few women who did not.
  • Instead, she opted for a dark green dress by Brit designer Jenny Packham with a black velvet ribbon, which some observers suggested was a subtle nod of support to the cause.
  • The royal family is meant to be studiously politically neutral, so by choosing not to observe the Time's Up dress code, she kept her views to herself.
  • Kate Middleton arrived with her husband, the Duke of Cambridge and president of Bafta — neither of whom wore the Time's Up lapel pin.
  • Some observers suggested the black velvet sash was a subtle nod of solidarity to the movement and its causes.

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Alibaba and Tencent wage $10 billion battle for retailers

  • The aggressive drive, supported by large cash piles and soaring share prices, is part of a battle to win over consumers and store operators to the two firms’ competing payment, logistics, social media and big data services.
  • Alibaba is China’s top e-commerce player and its affiliate Ant Financial leads in mobile payments.
  • Tencent also bought a stake in Yonghui Superstores, apparel retailers Vipshop Holdings and Heilan Home, mall operator Wanda Commercial, and this month snagged a strategic tie-up with grocer Bubugao.
  • In the other corner is Alibaba, which has invested even more heavily in Suning.com, Intime Retail, Sanjiang Shopping Club, Lianhua Supermarket, Wanda Film and IKEA-like home improvement store Easyhome.
  • In return, the physical stores get access to payment systems, logistics networks and other services – not to mention the reams of data on consumers that the tech firms control.

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JPMorgan Says Inflation, Rising Wages Actually Good for Stocks

  • Investors rattled by the recent bout of equity selling take heart: the fears about rising inflation and wage growth crimping corporate profits are way overblown, according to JPMorgan Securities Plc strategists.
  • Mislav Matejka, global equity strategist with the firm, argues it is the outlook for both production and sales volumes rather than higher wages that determine the impact on profitability.
  • “Cyclicals and the broader equity market do not tend to fall when costs start to shoot up, as these increased cost pressures are typically a sign of a healthy economic backdrop,” Matejka and other JPMorgan strategists said in a report.
  • Investors should consider selling when production and revenue growth begin to disappoint, at which point concerns about wages and input costs will disappear.
  • Historically, equities tend to produce their best returns with inflation in the 1 percent to 3 percent range, which also happens to be what JPMorgan is forecasting now.

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Russia Warns U.S. Not to ‘Play With Fire’ in Syrian Conflict

  • Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov warned the Trump administration not to “play with fire” as he lashed out at the U.S. over what he described as its “provocative” support for autonomy-seeking Kurds in Syria.
  • An armed clash earlier this month in which U.S. strikes may have killed more than 200 Russian mercenaries attacking American-backed forces inflamed a standoff between Moscow and Washington in Syria.
  • The U.S. is setting up a 30,000-strong Kurdish-led border protection force in the northeast of Syria, which Assad’s backers Russia and Iran have condemned as an attempt to carve out an American zone of influence.
  • Zarif said Iran is concerned about a “new wave” of foreign intervention in Syria led by the U.S. after the defeat of Islamic State.
  • He said Turkey has no right to intervene in Syria, amid reports that Kurdish forces have asked the Syrian army to help them fight Turkish troops.

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How One of the Most Profitable Trades of the Last Few Years Blew Up in a Single Day

  • Every week, hosts Joe Weisenthal and Tracy Alloway take you on a not-so-random walk through hot topics in markets, finance and economics.
  • In recent years, one of the easiest ways to make money in this market has been to bet on low volatility.
  • Up until recently, markets have been exceptionally tranquil, and trades predicated on that tranquility continuing have made a fortune.
  • But two of the most popular vehicles for making that trade, XIV and SVXY got obliterated in one day in early February.
  • On this week's episode of the Odd Lots podcast, we speak to Pravit Chintawongvanich, the head of Derivatives Strategy at Macro Risk Advisors about the episode.
  • He explains what the short volatility trade was, how specifically these funds operated, and how they ultimately became victims of their own success.

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Malcolm Turnbull desperately needs some Donald Trump luck

  • Malcolm Turnbull will want to use this week's visit to the US to promote the benefits of corporate tax cuts rather than exchanging helpful hints with Donald Trump on how to deal with sex scandals.
  • That's because despite his coarseness, his erratic nature, his boasting, his thin skin, his bluster, his abrupt reversals, his own version of "fake news", political reality is always more constrained – particularly given the checks and balances in the US political system that limit Trump's ability to do just as he wants.
  • The game of bluff is obviously high risk, particularly given an increasingly aggressive posture by China under Xi Jinping in areas like the South China Sea. Yet even if China and the US can't live with one another easily, they can't live well without each other either.
  • Despite trade tensions and the prospect of Trump pushing China by imposing more sanctions, mutual economic needs mean the game of bluff is not out of control so far.

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