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Articles related to "art"


The benefactors who champion art in death as they did in life

  • The Macfarlane Fund also awards a three-month residency and group exhibition in Kyneton to three graduates each year, while the annual Don Macfarlane Prize gives a no-strings-attached $50,000 to a senior Australian artist in recognition of their risk-taking, mentoring and long-term commitment to art.
  • Something of a pioneer in Australian performance and installation art, Katthy Cavaliere relied on fellowships and grants, notably the prestigious Helen Lempriere Travelling Art Scholarship in 2000, which enabled her to study under world-famous performance artist Marina Abramovic.
  • After Cavaliere’s friend, Daniel Mudie Cunningham, curated her 2015-16 Loved retrospective – which was warmly received at Hobart’s Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) and Carriageworks in Sydney – he announced Suspended Moment: The Katthy Cavaliere Fellowship, a suite of three one-off $100,000 grants, in 2018.

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The Non-Treachery of Dataset

  • There were various efforts for letting AI create art (e.g., a Model, trained on 24k Painting Dataset from Kaggle).
  • On one hand, we would like to train an end-to-end deep convolution model to investigate the capability of the deep model in fine-art painting classification problem.
  • On the other hand, we argue that classification of fine-art collections is a more challenging problem in comparison to objects or face recognition.
  • So does AI has the imagination to recognize art, a non-representational production of the human brain, heart, and hand?
  • AI is perplexed as well — the most it can do, is distinguishing between artist styles, depicted objects, and art movement features.
  • Exactly: ArtGAN cannot reconstruct famous paintings (in this case because it’s trained on the huge dataset from various art epochs).
  • It’s a disruptive force which lets us re-consider the human factor in the concept of art.

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Artist Jason Polan, who wanted to sketch everyone in New York, is dead at 37

  • The drawings were made quickly and sometimes affected by whether the subject was moving or had suddenly left.
  • Polan was open to sketching someone upon request, offering people to email him at a 24-hour notice the details of which street corner or public place they would be standing at for a duration of just two minutes.
  • Shortly after moving to New York from his native Michigan, he started drawing every artwork of one of his favorite museums, the Museum of Modern Art, hoping to get a job there.
  • Also notable was the "Taco Bell Drawing Club," which he started in 2005 as a weekly meeting open to anyone who wanted to join him in drawing at the Taco Bell restaurant in Manhattan's Union Square, where he would personally make laminated membership cards for every member.

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The Non-Treachery of Dataset

  • There were various efforts for letting AI create art (e.g., a Model, trained on 24k Painting Dataset from Kaggle).
  • On one hand, we would like to train an end-to-end deep convolution model to investigate the capability of the deep model in fine-art painting classification problem.
  • On the other hand, we argue that classification of fine-art collections is a more challenging problem in comparison to objects or face recognition.
  • So does AI has the imagination to recognize art, a non-representational production of the human brain, heart, and hand?
  • AI is perplexed as well — the most it can do, is distinguishing between artist styles, depicted objects, and art movement features.
  • Exactly: ArtGAN cannot reconstruct famous paintings (in this case because it’s trained on the huge dataset from various art epochs).
  • It’s a disruptive force which lets us re-consider the human factor in the concept of art.

save | comments | report | share on


The Non-Treachery of Dataset

  • There were various efforts for letting AI create art (e.g., a Model, trained on 24k Painting Dataset from Kaggle).
  • On one hand, we would like to train an end-to-end deep convolution model to investigate the capability of the deep model in fine-art painting classification problem.
  • On the other hand, we argue that classification of fine-art collections is a more challenging problem in comparison to objects or face recognition.
  • So does AI has the imagination to recognize art, a non-representational production of the human brain, heart, and hand?
  • AI is perplexed as well — the most it can do, is distinguishing between artist styles, depicted objects, and art movement features.
  • Exactly: ArtGAN cannot reconstruct famous paintings (in this case because it’s trained on the huge dataset from various art epochs).
  • It’s a disruptive force which lets us re-consider the human factor in the concept of art.

save | comments | report | share on


The Non-Treachery of Dataset

  • There were various efforts for letting AI create art (e.g., a Model, trained on 24k Painting Dataset from Kaggle).
  • On one hand, we would like to train an end-to-end deep convolution model to investigate the capability of the deep model in fine-art painting classification problem.
  • On the other hand, we argue that classification of fine-art collections is a more challenging problem in comparison to objects or face recognition.
  • So does AI has the imagination to recognize art, a non-representational production of the human brain, heart, and hand?
  • AI is perplexed as well — the most it can do, is distinguishing between artist styles, depicted objects, and art movement features.
  • Exactly: ArtGAN cannot reconstruct famous paintings (in this case because it’s trained on the huge dataset from various art epochs).
  • It’s a disruptive force which lets us re-consider the human factor in the concept of art.

save | comments | report | share on


The Non-Treachery of Dataset

  • There were various efforts for letting AI create art (e.g., a Model, trained on 24k Painting Dataset from Kaggle).
  • On one hand, we would like to train an end-to-end deep convolution model to investigate the capability of the deep model in fine-art painting classification problem.
  • On the other hand, we argue that classification of fine-art collections is a more challenging problem in comparison to objects or face recognition.
  • So does AI has the imagination to recognize art, a non-representational production of the human brain, heart, and hand?
  • AI is perplexed as well — the most it can do, is distinguishing between artist styles, depicted objects, and art movement features.
  • Exactly: ArtGAN cannot reconstruct famous paintings (in this case because it’s trained on the huge dataset from various art epochs).
  • It’s a disruptive force which lets us re-consider the human factor in the concept of art.

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An art fair where you can buy a steer and a painting

  • DENVER — A chorus of cowbells rang out instead of a gavel to end the bidding session at the 2020 Coors Western Art Exhibition and Sale, for 27 years an annual event at the National Western Stock Show in Denver, Colorado.
  • Animal handlers and Grand Prix horse owners are also drawn away from the stables to visit the the Coors art exhibition.
  • It may be easy for some to dismiss an event like the Coors Western Art Exhibit and Sale because it does not present radically new ideas or compete with the eye-popping prices of the big auction houses.
  • Coors Western Art Exhibit and Sale, curated by Rose Fredrick, is open on the third floor of the Exposition Hall (4655 Humbolt Street, Denver, CO) at the National Western Stock Show, from January 11 through 26.

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The Myth of Artistic Freedom (2017)

  • And at the beginning of December, a visitor to the Metropolitan Museum of Art named Mia Merrill circulated a petition, which collected more than 11,000 signatures, asking for the removal, or at least the recontextualization, of Balthus’s Thérèse Dreaming (1938), arguing that the painting objectifies women and romanticizes the sexualization of children, and that the museum’s failure to acknowledge these problems affirms or even celebrates them.
  • Mia Merrill’s petition against Balthus’s painting, a historical rather than a contemporary work of art, seems to have inspired a particularly strong reaction: "Spare us the moral hysteria that threatens a new age of censorship," Rachel Cooke wrote in the Guardian.
  • However, the point that inevitably follows – that such a repudiation and reevaluation would be wildly out of proportion – is not true: The call to reject exploitation and to stop celebrating it under the guise of artistic freedom is only commensurate with the history of oppression that accompanied, justified, and was in turn justified by, these beautiful, masterful, interesting, important works of art.

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Corvettes worth $1M are trapped in buildings that crumbled in the Houston explosion

  • The early morning explosion at Watson Grinding and Manufacturing damaged other buildings up to a half mile away and took the lives of two Watson employees.
  • Gordon Andrus' restoration business, Houston Corvette Service, occupies two buildings directly across the street from Watson Grinding.
  • After Friday's explosion, he told CNN that his buildings have been destroyed and he doesn't know the condition of the cars that were undergoing restoration.
  • What he does know is that there were about 15 cars worth about $1 million collectively inside.
  • Andrus' 25-year-old business occupies four buildings in total, only two of which were destroyed.
  • An investigation into what caused the blast is underway and may take months, according to Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo.
  • In addition to destroying buildings and killing two, the explosion left some residents temporarily displaced.

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