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Articles related to "beginners"


Coding practices your future self will love you for

  • It is a good idea to copy-paste the same function a minimum two times in the codebase.
  • Practice debugging code on your local machine via logs instead of a debugger.
  • Debugging on your local machine ensures that logs are added at the right place.
  • Premature optimization, especially micro-optimization, is not a good idea because you don’t know whether you are working on removing a performance bottle-neck or not.
  • Adding unnecessary features makes the code harder to read & debug.
  • The common assumption is that CI/CD pipelines are important only in teams that are pushing a lot of code into production every day.
  • In my experience, CI/CD pipelines are even more important for codebases that are rarely touched because you won’t remember how & where the code was deployed.

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What is GraphQL and why I should use it?

  • Clients need to be authenticated, authorised and then request data for those transactions to happen.
  • GraphQL queries help you to fetch only the records and attributes you need - we have seen examples earlier.
  • Use GraphQL to fetch records with specified relationships, rather than making separate requests for distinct entities.
  • Server receives GraphQL requests from clients, establishes connection to database, converts graph queries to a language understood by database, fetches results and sends the responses back to clients.
  • The schema definition helps a client-side developer to see and understand the relationships b/w data entities, and thereon construct a GraphQL query.
  • Use GraphQL when you need to fetch a lot of data having varying shapes / many relationships.
  • Use GraphQL to simplify the data passed between client and server.

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What and How of Futures and async/await in Rust

  • In this post, we also discuss async/await, and how they affect futures, and how Rust's proposed pinning types act as the glue to make async/await work.
  • Futures are Rust's way of expressing asynchronous computations, but even after reading the documentation, it can be hard to figure out how all the pieces of futures (and tokio) fit together.
  • The highly anticipated async and await keywords that are coming down the pike promise to greatly reduce the friction of writing and using asynchronous code, but add even more to the mystery of how this stuff all works.
  • We go through what futures are, how they work, how they are used to represent things like asynchronous I/O (like networking), how they are executed, and how they are evolving as they are being adopted into the standard library.
  • We also discuss async/await, and how they affect futures, and how Rust's proposed pinning types act as the glue to make async/await work.

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6 Ways Beginners Can Add Their Own Style to Web Development Tutorial Projects

  • I didn’t understand that I could have fun and add my own style to the code, and when I made it to the capstone project and had to come up with the design on my own I was overwhelmed.
  • I’d like to share a few tips I’ve learned for choosing fonts that look good together and share a resource that makes it easy.
  • Now that we know a little more about using fonts in our projects, let’s talk about CSS gradients.
  • A gradient is an easy way to add some interest to your projects without writing a lot of code.
  • Border radius is another CSS property that can help us change the look and feel of our pages with just a little bit of code.
  • Here’s a tool I like to play around with when I’m considering adding a border radius to elements in my code.

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How To Learn Java And Not Getting Bored

  • Good news: offline programming courses last much less than studying at a university.
  • For example, read a Java book you like all together with solving coding problems from the online collection.
  • Studying computer science at the university and … again, solve coding problems.
  • So my answer is this: learn Java anywhere, but solving a lot of coding problems is a must.
  • CodeGym — an online Java Core Course with 1200 coding tasks (from the easiest to pretty tough) and validator and lectures… GeeksForGeeks — a good resource with many tasks and different courses.
  • Codewars is a good site for intermediate to advanced Java students, where you solve enjoyable problems and puzzles.
  • While your coding skills grow, on the contrary, it is better to “suffer” a little longer trying to solve a tough problem.

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How users and applications stay safe on the Internet: it's proxy servers all the way down

  • Thanks to tracking cookies, browser fingerprinting, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) selling our browsing logs to advertisers, and our own inexplicable inclination to put our names and faces on social networks, online anonymity is out like last year’s LaCroix flavours.
  • This provides us with some anonymity, as the website we’re trying to reach will not see our originating IP address; however, the proxy server that we choose to use will know exactly who originated the request.
  • My preferred method, if we have a little time and a few monthly dollars to invest in our security, is to set up our own virtual instance with a company such as Amazon Web Services or Digital Ocean and use this as our proxy server.

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Free Code Camp and It's Community

  • When I started posting my coding projects on Twitter and connecting with other developers I discovered my next educational resource that everyone seemed to be talking about.
  • Every section of content ends in roughly five portfolio projects to show off your work to potential employers.
  • As I was making my way through the front end libraries section trying to learn React and Redux I discovered the very helpful discussion forum.
  • A mix of new coders and others with experience trying to learn something new.
  • I would recommend this site to anybody looking to either start coding or learn a new library for work.
  • As somebody who can’t afford to go to a coding bootcamp or go back to school and get my CS degree this site is a cost effective alternative to build my portfolio and go out into the workforce as a freelance coder.

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Free Code Camp and It's Community

  • When I started posting my coding projects on Twitter and connecting with other developers I discovered my next educational resource that everyone seemed to be talking about.
  • Every section of content ends in roughly five portfolio projects to show off your work to potential employers.
  • As I was making my way through the front end libraries section trying to learn React and Redux I discovered the very helpful discussion forum.
  • A mix of new coders and others with experience trying to learn something new.
  • I would recommend this site to anybody looking to either start coding or learn a new library for work.
  • As somebody who can’t afford to go to a coding bootcamp or go back to school and get my CS degree this site is a cost effective alternative to build my portfolio and go out into the workforce as a freelance coder.

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Pass-By-Value in C++ and Rust

  • Once such difference beginners in Rust will run into quickly is what happens when you pass a parameter by value.
  • The code inside the setCoolValueToTen() function is operating on its very own copy, made from and identical to co2 when it was passed in but entirely distinct from it.
  • We're already starting to see a problem - we can't just mutate values without asking first, like we can in C++.
  • When pass by value in C++, the compiler will just assume you know what you're doing and call a copy constructor for you, even if it doesn't really make sense.
  • It's not copying the original object in, it's actually bringing the object from outside - but the caveat is that the calling scope no longer owns this value at all, the new function does.

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Curate, Don't Only Consume

  • In this article, I am going to teach you how to write a simple computer program that will do the math for you, so that you can be on your way to vast riches using only a whole lot of pennies!
  • (The code is on the numbered lines, starting with 1, and counting.) Now that we have a blank code screen, we are ready to type the JavaScript commands to tally our 30 day salary.
  • Now that we know what we want our program to do, let's write the actual code that will do it.
  • For our project, we're going to need three variables: a number (pay amount), a string (the text to display on the screen), and a counter (used to loop through all thirty days).
  • A lot of computer programs use semicolons to inform the computer that you're finished with that code block, and JavaScript is one of them.

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