Sign Up Now!

Sign up and get personalized intelligence briefing delivered daily.


Sign Up

Articles related to "calls"


'This is just a cover story': Melbourne mates defy corruption inquiry

  • But it was the brazenness of explanations given under oath by James Pinder, the man who used to run Victoria's government-owned regional rail business V/Line, and George Haritos, the man who co-owns and runs Melbourne-based cleaning company Transclean, that was breathtaking.
  • The gambling story appeared tenuous when Metro Trains operations manager Peter Bollas, who also lost his job this week, said he was given  $8000-$10,000 in cash most months by Transclean to ensure it kept its cleaning contracts and got awarded more work.
  • The "sprinkle" was a reference to plans to ask Mr Haritos for more money after both Metro Trains and V/Line gave Transclean extra work following the COVID-19 pandemic, Mr Bollas said.
  • In late April, Mr Bollas complained to Mr Pinder that Metro Trains was spending $1.3 million a month giving Transclean extra work due to COVID-19 (Mr Pinder said V/Line was spending $500,000 a month), but that Mr Haritos had not put more people on to clean trains.

save | comments | report | share on


Is Xilinx Stronger with AMD or Without It?

  • The Xilinx platform is comprised of well-respected programmable logic boards governed by a system-on-a-chip (SoC) called Zynq.
  • ACAP is a name Xilinx has given to what it considers a new class of processor – if that wording rings familiar, it’s because that’s what Nvidia said it would build together with Arm – in which programmable logic, built-in logic (in the form of “digital signal processor” or DSP, engines), Arm Cortex-A72 cores, and programmable networks reside in attached blocks on the same processor.
  • AMD said its goal was to produce a single platform that could not only fuse together graphics for PCs but could fuse the CPU and GPU together into what AMD described (is this feeling repetitive yet?) into a new category of processor.

save | comments | report | share on


Compiling a Lisp to x86-64: Labelled procedure calls

  • In order to compile a labelcall expression, we will compile all of the arguments provided, save them in consecutive locations on the stack, and then emit a call instruction.
  • This makes our code simpler, but it also means that at some point later on, we will have to add a different kind of calling convention so that we can call foreign functions (like printf, or exit, or something).
  • What used to just compile an expression now validates that what we’ve passed in at least vaguely looks like a well-formed labels form before picking it into its component parts: the bindings and the body.
  • I split this into two functions: one helper that pulls apart code objects (I didn’t want to do that in labels because I thought it would clutter the meaning), and one recursive function that does the work of putting the parameters in the environment.

save | comments | report | share on


JAX: Differentiable Computing by Google

  • The jit functor transforms the input function by returning a compiled version of it to the caller.
  • Calling the original selu function will use the Python interpreter, while calling selu_jit will call the compiled version, which should be much faster, especially for vectorized inputs such as numpy arrays.
  • Furthermore, the JIT compilation only occurs once and is cached thereafter, making subsequent calls of the function very efficient.
  • What makes JAX particularly interesting to machine learning researchers is its ability to compute gradients of arbitrary pure functions.
  • JAX provides a useful alternative to more high-level frameworks such as PyTorch or Tensorflow for researchers who need extra flexibility.
  • The ability to differentiate through native Python and NumPy functions is amazing and the JIT compilation and auto-vectorization features greatly simplify writing efficient code for massively-parallel architectures like GPUs or TPUs. What I like most about JAX, however, is its clean functional interface.

save | comments | report | share on


JAX: Differentiable Computing by Google

  • The jit functor transforms the input function by returning a compiled version of it to the caller.
  • Calling the original selu function will use the Python interpreter, while calling selu_jit will call the compiled version, which should be much faster, especially for vectorized inputs such as numpy arrays.
  • Furthermore, the JIT compilation only occurs once and is cached thereafter, making subsequent calls of the function very efficient.
  • What makes JAX particularly interesting to machine learning researchers is its ability to compute gradients of arbitrary pure functions.
  • JAX provides a useful alternative to more high-level frameworks such as PyTorch or Tensorflow for researchers who need extra flexibility.
  • The ability to differentiate through native Python and NumPy functions is amazing and the JIT compilation and auto-vectorization features greatly simplify writing efficient code for massively-parallel architectures like GPUs or TPUs. What I like most about JAX, however, is its clean functional interface.

save | comments | report | share on


JAX: Differentiable Computing by Google

  • The jit functor transforms the input function by returning a compiled version of it to the caller.
  • Calling the original selu function will use the Python interpreter, while calling selu_jit will call the compiled version, which should be much faster, especially for vectorized inputs such as numpy arrays.
  • Furthermore, the JIT compilation only occurs once and is cached thereafter, making subsequent calls of the function very efficient.
  • What makes JAX particularly interesting to machine learning researchers is its ability to compute gradients of arbitrary pure functions.
  • JAX provides a useful alternative to more high-level frameworks such as PyTorch or Tensorflow for researchers who need extra flexibility.
  • The ability to differentiate through native Python and NumPy functions is amazing and the JIT compilation and auto-vectorization features greatly simplify writing efficient code for massively-parallel architectures like GPUs or TPUs. What I like most about JAX, however, is its clean functional interface.

save | comments | report | share on


JAX: Differentiable Computing by Google

  • The jit functor transforms the input function by returning a compiled version of it to the caller.
  • Calling the original selu function will use the Python interpreter, while calling selu_jit will call the compiled version, which should be much faster, especially for vectorized inputs such as numpy arrays.
  • Furthermore, the JIT compilation only occurs once and is cached thereafter, making subsequent calls of the function very efficient.
  • What makes JAX particularly interesting to machine learning researchers is its ability to compute gradients of arbitrary pure functions.
  • JAX provides a useful alternative to more high-level frameworks such as PyTorch or Tensorflow for researchers who need extra flexibility.
  • The ability to differentiate through native Python and NumPy functions is amazing and the JIT compilation and auto-vectorization features greatly simplify writing efficient code for massively-parallel architectures like GPUs or TPUs. What I like most about JAX, however, is its clean functional interface.

save | comments | report | share on


Walter Wallace Jr struggled with mental health issues, family says

  • Wallace, who had nine children, suffered from bipolar disorder and was in crisis during the time of the shooting, his family said.
  • Relatives called authorities at least three times that day, including one time when Wallace's brother asked for an ambulance, Shaka Johnson, an attorney representing the Wallace family, said in a news conference Tuesday.
  • The attorney said Wallace's wife then told officers that her husband was "manic, bipolar" and in crisis.
  • Philadelphia Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Tuesday that the officers involved in the shooting were not equipped with Tasers and every officer in the city is not issued one.
  • Wallace's father asked protesters to honor his son's memory and the city they call home.
  • Wallace's wife, who Johnson said is expected to give birth to a girl "any day now," and two of Wallace's young sons joined other relatives.

save | comments | report | share on


What comes after Zoom fatigue

  • So you might say that we’ve struggled with Zoom fatigue for quite some time, when you consider that abysmal picture quality, stuttering audio, and the general awkwardness of talking to screens have always been features of the video chat experience.
  • While I do remember trying FaceTime when it launched, until the pandemic, I never actually wanted to video chat rather than talk on the phone or over text, especially in my personal life.
  • Most of the major tech companies have now built their own video chat platforms, with the most prominent ones, like Google Meet and Microsoft Teams, aimed at business customers.
  • During the pandemic, we’ve all started relying on video chat technology for health care, religion, entertainment, and simply keeping up with friends.
  • That explains my initial surprise when the folks from Microsoft Teams started telling me how their workplace software had taken on new roles, like social networking, in many users’ lives.

save | comments | report | share on


New approach to detecting deepfakes by detecting pulse and heartbeat

  • Deepfakes found "in the wild" are many steps below the kind of quality that Yin's lab generates, but it means that manipulated videos can be much easier to spot.
  • Intel's involvement in the FakeCatcher research is connected to its interests in volumetric capture and augmented/virtual reality experiences.
  • Intel Studios operates what Demir calls "the world's largest volumetric capture stage": 100 cameras in a 10,000-square-foot geodesic dome that can handle about 30 people simultaneously—even a few horses once.
  • By compiling the FakeCatcher data and reverse-engineering it, Intel Studios hopes to make more realistic renderings that incorporate the kind of biological markers that humans with real heartbeats have.
  • Future research will seek to improve and refine the FakeCatcher technology, drilling further down into the data to determine how the deepfakes are made.

save | comments | report | share on