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Articles related to "ceo"


V/Line, Metro Trains executives terminated

  • Heads have rolled at Victoria's regional and metro train lines and contracts scrapped after a Metro Trains executive this week admitted he accepted $150,000 in cash payments from cleaning group Transclean to help it keep and tender for work.
  • V/Line chief executive James Pinder and Metro Trains head of operational support for rolling stock, Peter Bollas, have lost their jobs after Mr Bollas told Victoria's Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission (IBAC) on Wednesday that he had received $150,000 in cash from Transclean in return for helping grow its business.
  • The hearings revealed a note former V/Line CEO James Pinder wrote for Transclean boss George Haritos after he was raided by IBAC.
  • Transclean previously had a contract to clean Metro Trains' stations that started in late 2010, but lost it in 2017.

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'This is just a cover story': Melbourne mates defy corruption inquiry

  • But it was the brazenness of explanations given under oath by James Pinder, the man who used to run Victoria's government-owned regional rail business V/Line, and George Haritos, the man who co-owns and runs Melbourne-based cleaning company Transclean, that was breathtaking.
  • The gambling story appeared tenuous when Metro Trains operations manager Peter Bollas, who also lost his job this week, said he was given  $8000-$10,000 in cash most months by Transclean to ensure it kept its cleaning contracts and got awarded more work.
  • The "sprinkle" was a reference to plans to ask Mr Haritos for more money after both Metro Trains and V/Line gave Transclean extra work following the COVID-19 pandemic, Mr Bollas said.
  • In late April, Mr Bollas complained to Mr Pinder that Metro Trains was spending $1.3 million a month giving Transclean extra work due to COVID-19 (Mr Pinder said V/Line was spending $500,000 a month), but that Mr Haritos had not put more people on to clean trains.

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Jack Dorsey: Twitter has no influence over elections

  • Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Twitter does not have the ability to influence elections because there are ample additional sources of information, in response to questioning from Republican Sen. Ted Cruz during a hearing Wednesday.
  • Conservatives argue Twitter and Facebook's moderation decisions help Democrats, while liberals contend the platforms shy from effectively cracking down on misinformation to appease Republicans.
  • Driving the news: Dorsey is testifying remotely alongside Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, the much-discussed law that allows tech platforms to moderate content and not be held legally liable for it.
  • Reality check: Cruz has been hammering Twitter for its decisions around limiting access to the New York Post's controversial coverage of Hunter Biden, and used his questioning time at the hearing to berate Dorsey.

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The Problem with (All) the Tech Hearings

  • These companies have our attention, and it’s a longer story why (though I’ve long-written about multiple parts of it: the business model, the network-effects, the power of sociality, the preferential-attachment dynamics (meaning winner-takes-more, which often evolves into winner-takes-almost-all)) and they’re selling it to advertisers—that’s how they make money—so they must keep us users on those sites.
  • These few companies are operating in such a large number of countries, with so little staff, that they can hardly keep up, and instead they respond mostly to public pressure (from places their leaders and employees care about) and credible legislative threats—which means threats from the US and Europe.
  • That’s where we have to debate everything from the dominance of few social media companies over the public sphere to the problem of regulating attention in an age of information glut.

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Twitter's stock plummets after it reports slow user growth

  • On the bright side, Twitter posted revenue of $936 million for the quarter, far exceeding analysts expectations of $777 million, and up 14% compared to the same period last year.
  • Twitter's quarterly report comes a day after CEO Jack Dorsey appeared before the Senate Commerce Committee, alongside Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Google CEO Sundar Pichai.
  • Dorsey was confronted by Republicans about why Twitter has fact-checked tweets by President Trump and about other claims of bias against conservative content.
  • In its earnings release, Twitter stressed that the health of conversations on the platform continues to be a top priority as it works to reduce abuse and misinformation on the platform, including labeling tweets that falsely claim a win for candidates or encourage interference with election results or polling places.

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Apple One services subscription bundles start launching tomorrow

  • Apple is launching its Apple One services bundle tomorrow, though the company’s workout service Fitness+ isn’t quite ready yet.
  • On an earnings call today, CEO Tim Cook revealed tomorrow’s rollout and called the service the “easiest way for users to enjoy Apple services.” In a conversation with Bloomberg, Apple CFO Luca Maestri revealed the launch timing for Fitness+ as well.
  • The subscription bundle is designed around bringing more users into more Apple Services.
  • The company’s $14.99 per month individual plan includes Apple Music, Apple TV+, Apple Arcade and 50GB of iCloud storage.
  • Apple also sells $19.99 family plans that bump up the storage to 200GB and is planning to debut a “premiere” plan for $29.99 that includes Fitness+ and Apple News+.
  • Apple’s Services division is growing in importance to the company’s bottom line, with the group reaching an all-time-high in revenue and reaching past half of the quarter’s iPhone revenues.

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Facebook's pandemic user bounce fades

  • Facebook on Thursday said that its daily and monthly active users in the US and Canada, a core market, declined slightly in the third quarter compared to the previous three months, and it expects this trend to continue.
  • The company had 2.74 billion monthly active users during the quarter ending in September, an increase of 12% from the prior year.
  • When combining all of Facebook's various apps, including Instagram, Messenger and WhatsApp, the company reported 3.21 billion users, an increase of 14%.
  • Last quarter, Facebook said its daily and monthly active user numbers "reflect increased engagement as people around the world sheltered in place and used our products to connect with the people and organizations they care about." However, the company previously cautioned that as stay at home orders begin to ease, it expected engagement to be flat or to slightly drop in the future.

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Senate hauls Zuckerberg, Dorsey in to hearing to yell at them about tweets

  • The Senate Commerce Committee met for a hearing Wednesday meant to probe some of the most seemingly intractable tech questions of our time: is the liability shield granted to tech firms under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act helpful or harmful, and does it need amending?
  • According to a New York Times analysis, 85 percent of Republicans' questions to the witnesses focused on the platforms' alleged anti-conservative bias.
  • This supposed suppression of conservative viewpoints has been a particularly potent rallying call among US right-wing politicians and personalities for more than a year, and it is the driving force behind Republican calls to amend or abolish Section 230.
  • Last year, Zuckerberg wrote in a Washington Post op-ed that he would like expanded US regulation relating to harmful content, election integrity, privacy, and data portability.

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Expensify employees respond to CEO's email urging customers vote Biden - Business Insider

  • On October 22, Expensify CEO David Barrett hit send on an email to the company's 10 million customers.
  • Expensify employees told Business Insider that the email invited a wave of withering criticisms of the company on social media and on its customer service portal.
  • The main reason that Expensify customers say they're switching, he says, is because they're put off by the blatant "invasion of privacy," after Barrett's newsletter went out to not only the company administrators who handle their Expensify accounts but all of their employees who use Expensify, too.
  • The email blast has made Expensify — a unicorn startup that sells software for tracking business expenses — the antithesis to tech companies like Facebook and Google that are now trying to purge politics from the workplace.

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Expensify employees respond to CEO's email urging customers vote Biden - Business Insider

  • On October 22, Expensify CEO David Barrett hit send on an email to the company's 10 million customers.
  • Expensify employees told Business Insider that the email invited a wave of withering criticisms of the company on social media and on its customer service portal.
  • The main reason that Expensify customers say they're switching, he says, is because they're put off by the blatant "invasion of privacy," after Barrett's newsletter went out to not only the company administrators who handle their Expensify accounts but all of their employees who use Expensify, too.
  • The email blast has made Expensify — a unicorn startup that sells software for tracking business expenses — the antithesis to tech companies like Facebook and Google that are now trying to purge politics from the workplace.

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