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Articles related to "chinese"


Trump’s WeChat ban could devastate Apple’s Chinese business

  • Trump’s ban might not only force Apple to remove WeChat from its App Store — which would destroy Apple’s Chinese smartphone business — it could existentially change how Apple is able to build and sell new products in the future.
  • If Apple can’t offer WeChat on the iPhone due to Trump’s ban, then its Chinese business will almost certainly evaporate overnight.
  • It’s not just iPhone sales, either: Chinese customers spent $1.53 billion in April on App Store purchases alone, a number that doesn’t even include other service revenue for Apple (like iCloud or Apple Music subscriptions), which is a key part of Apple’s ongoing business strategy.
  • It’s also a reminder of how easily the precarious house of its hyper-concentrated manufacturing hubs, App Store policies, and international business deals can fall apart — and potentially, take a huge chunk of Apple down with it.

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Banning TikTok suggests that the US no longer believes in a global internet

  • So when President Trump issued two executive orders Thursday night that all but ban two Chinese social media networks — the video app TikTok and the messaging app WeChat — from operating in the United States, citing national security concerns, the decision seemed straight out of China’s own playbook.
  • The executive orders and Microsoft’s interest in buying TikTok’s American business echo what happened in 2017, when China’s cybersecurity law went into effect and required foreign companies to store data about Chinese customers within China.
  • But if the government now believes that the only safe data and computer networks are within its own borders — as the animus toward TikTok and WeChat suggests — then, like China, the United States fundamentally does not believe in a global internet.

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Trump, TikTok and a dangerous precedent for democracy

  • The Trump administration wants to ban the app because it believes its Chinese owners could be required to cooperate with the Chinese government, which in turn, could use the platform for espionage or to spread misinformation, threatening national security.
  • They suspect that the Chinese government could force ByteDance to censor content, as happens routinely on the Chinese internet, most notably on WeChat, where words and images relating to controversial issues like the Tiananmen Square massacre and Tibet are banned from group and private chats.
  • There is also some irony in the idea that should the US jettison TikTok from the internet, it would be behaving in some respects like China, whose government carefully censors what its citizens can do online.

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New Chapter in U.S.-China Ties Marked by Confrontation

  • Some of the U.S. actions were in response to moves by China, including a draconian new national security law for Hong Kong, repression of Uighurs in Xinjiang province and continuing U.S. complaints about cyber theft or forced technology transfer.
  • Advisers to former Vice President Joseph Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, say that a Biden administration would take a less confrontational tone toward China, but many of the policies on trade and national security would be similar.
  • In past crises in U.S.-China relations, resulting for example from Beijing’s killing of protesters in Tiananmen Square in 1989 or the U.S. bombing of China’s embassy in Belgrade in 1999, the two sides ultimately put economic considerations above issues of national security or human rights.
  • Only three months after Tiananmen Square, for instance, national security adviser Brent Scowcroft, flew to Beijing to confer with Chinese officials, warn them about Congressional sanctions and try to keep the relationship from unraveling.

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What is Tencent? The $69 billion Chinese behemoth that owns WeChat - Business Insider

  • President Donald Trump on Thursday issued an executive order aimed at two Chinese-owned apps: ByteDance's hyper-popular TikTok, and WeChat, the messaging app owned by mega-conglomerate Tencent.
  • Plus, its messaging apps, WeChat and QQ, are used by more than two-thirds of Chinese people, according to Bloomberg.
  • The new executive order bars American companies and individuals from making "any transaction" with WeChat over concerns about how much user data the app collects and whether the Chinese government is able to access it.
  • While Ma oversees the company, Tencent's day-to-day operations are managed by its president, Martin Lau, according to Bloomberg.
  • And in 2015, Tencent signed a deal worth $700 million with National Basketball Association, making the company the NBA's exclusive digital partner in China.

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What is Tencent? The $69 billion Chinese behemoth that owns WeChat - Business Insider

  • President Donald Trump on Thursday issued an executive order aimed at two Chinese-owned apps: ByteDance's hyper-popular TikTok, and WeChat, the messaging app owned by mega-conglomerate Tencent.
  • Plus, its messaging apps, WeChat and QQ, are used by more than two-thirds of Chinese people, according to Bloomberg.
  • The new executive order bars American companies and individuals from making "any transaction" with WeChat over concerns about how much user data the app collects and whether the Chinese government is able to access it.
  • While Ma oversees the company, Tencent's day-to-day operations are managed by its president, Martin Lau, according to Bloomberg.
  • And in 2015, Tencent signed a deal worth $700 million with National Basketball Association, making the company the NBA's exclusive digital partner in China.

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Trump’s WeChat ban could touch everything from Spotify to League of Legends

  • Most of the immediate focus has been on TikTok, which was targeted through its parent company ByteDance — but the second order could have a far more unpredictable impact, targeting text app WeChat and its parent company Tencent.
  • Tencent is one of the largest tech companies in the world, and it’s spent the last few years buying stakes in video game studios, music companies, and social media apps.
  • But even if President Trump means to limit the impact to WeChat, it’s not clear he’ll be able to.
  • If the ban is limited to WeChat, the obvious question becomes why the Trump administration would also be comfortable with Tencent having such deep involvement in so many businesses that operate in the US.
  • If Apple is forced to remove WeChat from the App Store — as it likely will be — consumers in China are going to stop buying iPhones.

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What is WeChat and why does Trump want to ban it?

  • New York (CNN Business) - President Donald Trump wants to ban WeChat, dramatically escalating tensions with China.
  • WeChat is owned by Tencent, China's biggest tech company and the world's largest gaming company.
  • President Donald Trump issued executive orders late Thursday night that would ban WeChat and TikTok, the short-form video app owned by Beijing-based ByteDance, from operating in the United States in 45 days if they are not sold by their parent companies.
  • Tencent owns Riot Games, the maker of the world's biggest PC game "League of Legends," and has a stake in Epic Games, parent company of "Fortnite." It also has a huge mobile games business and is working with the Pokémon Company to make what looks to be a cross between "Pokémon" and "League of Legends," called "Pokémon Unite." The game was announced in June and has no release date yet.

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Escalating US-China tensions spark fresh market fears

  • What's happening: President Donald Trump on Thursday issued executive orders that would ban social media apps TikTok and WeChat from operating in the United States if the platforms are not sold by their Chinese owners within 45 days.
  • The move against WeChat sent shares of its owner Tencent plunging as much as 10% in Hong Kong, my CNN Business colleague Sherisse Pham reports.
  • It also marks the first time the government "has attempted to ban a software application running on millions of mobile phones" in the United States, Triolo wrote in a note to clients Friday.
  • That's not all: The President's Working Group on Financial Markets said Thursday that US stock exchanges should set new rules that could compel Chinese firms to open their books to American regulators.

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The US declared war on TikTok because it can’t handle the truth

  • In July, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told Fox News that Americans should only use TikTok “if you want your private information in the hands of the Chinese Communist Party.” It’s not just the GOP administration lashing out, either; the Democratic National Committee has also previously issued warnings to campaign staff not to use TikTok on their work phones, citing how much data is gathered.
  • In these instances and more, American tech companies behaved as an informal arm of the US State Department, operating on the assumption that the freedom of expression and the freedom to dissent against any government are not just inherent goods, but values that, when spread abroad, will strengthen America’s diplomatic position.
  • Just like China had tried to use Google to spy on its activists, the National Security Agency had been secretly collecting bulk data from almost every American company you could think of.

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