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Articles related to "company"


Why Laugh at Quibi's Failure?

  • There seems to be a fundamental misconception of why people are enjoying Quibi's demise.
  • Startup vets seem to believe it's making fun of people who took a big swing and failed.
  • It's not just that Quibi was a terrible idea, a lot of products begin as terrible sounding ideas and then take off.
  • There were a ton of jokes about Snapchat's disappearing messages when it first launched.
  • From its inception, Quibi failed the authenticity smell check.
  • If you're going to create a new product you better be able to convince people there's a reason it should exist.
  • Creating good content is difficult and failing at it can be excused.
  • Netflix took years to reliably create good content.
  • All these decisions (and a bunch more) put together painted Quibi as a company run by arrogant execs who thought their experience meant they knew better than their audience.

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ASX set for flat open; Trump, Biden debate in focus

  • The company also says PEXA demonstrated accelerated takeup during COVID-19 and is expected to deliver a material return of capital in coming months.
  • In an address to its annual general meeting, chief executive Chris Ashton noted the relative improvement of the Australian dollar compared to this time last year is creating foreign exchange headwinds, given the majority of the company's earnings come from currencies other than Australian dollars.
  • Revenue from Intel's data-center business fell 7 per cent to $US5.9 billion in the reported quarter, while analysts on average had expected revenue of $US6.21 billion, according to FactSet. Intel is the dominant provider of processor chips for PCs and data centers, but the company has struggled with manufacturing delays, saying in July that its next generation of chipmaking technology has slipped six months behind schedule.

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Uber sued by drivers over 'threatening' Prop. 22 messages in app - Business Insider

  • Earlier this month, as part of its multi-million dollar bid to get California's Proposition 22 passed at the polls in November, Uber sent a series of push notifications and in-app messages to drivers and riders.
  • In August, California's Attorney General filed a lawsuit against both Uber and Lyft, accusing them of breaking the state's new employment law that was passed at the beginning of the year.
  • Because drivers set their own hours, use their own cars, and can work for competing apps, Uber has long maintained that it is not breaking the law by treating them as contractors.
  • 22, which is supported by nearly $200 million in funding from Uber, DoorDash, Lyft and other gig-work companies, would establish a benefits fund that would follow workers across apps and jobs, while keeping them as contractors.

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Uber sued by drivers over 'threatening' Prop. 22 messages in app - Business Insider

  • Earlier this month, as part of its multi-million dollar bid to get California's Proposition 22 passed at the polls in November, Uber sent a series of push notifications and in-app messages to drivers and riders.
  • In August, California's Attorney General filed a lawsuit against both Uber and Lyft, accusing them of breaking the state's new employment law that was passed at the beginning of the year.
  • Because drivers set their own hours, use their own cars, and can work for competing apps, Uber has long maintained that it is not breaking the law by treating them as contractors.
  • 22, which is supported by nearly $200 million in funding from Uber, DoorDash, Lyft and other gig-work companies, would establish a benefits fund that would follow workers across apps and jobs, while keeping them as contractors.

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Amazon faces a more costly workers’ comp classification in Washington state

  • Just last month, a stunning report showed how Amazon fulfillment centers across the country saw rising injury rates between 2016 and 2019, sourced from internal company data.
  • And now, proposed legislation in Washington state would mean Amazon could pay a higher workers’ compensation premium than other warehouse-owning companies next year.
  • Ratko, the deputy assistant director of the Washington Department of Labor & Industries Insurance Services Division, told The Seattle Times.
  • The department found in 2019 that Amazon’s fulfillment centers had a growing share of injury claims and insurance costs compared to other warehouse operators, according to The Seattle Times.
  • And although warehousing insurance premiums went up 18 percent in 2020, non-Amazon warehouse operators have been seeing their workers’ compensation claim rates move downward.
  • Amazon’s new rate would be higher than those for mechanized logging operations, law enforcement agencies, and more than 260 other industries, according to The Seattle Times.

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Sacklers—who made $11 billion off opioid crisis—to pay $225 million in damages

  • The infamous megarich Sackler family will pay $235 million in civil penalties as part of a controversial $8.3 billion settlement with the US Department of Justice.
  • Members of the Sackler family own and formerly directed Purdue Pharma, which introduced the powerful opioid painkiller OxyContin in 1996.
  • Throughout the years, Purdue and members of the Sackler family have been accused of using aggressive, misleading marketing tactics to push the highly addictive opioid painkiller on doctors and patients, which helped spark a massive nationwide epidemic of opioid abuse and overdose.
  • Separately, the Sackler family agreed to pay $225 million in damages for civil liability under the False Claims Act liability.
  • They family will also relinquish control of Purdue, which is set to become a public-benefit company aimed at providing anti-addiction and overdose rescue drugs.

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What comes after Zoom fatigue

  • So you might say that we’ve struggled with Zoom fatigue for quite some time, when you consider that abysmal picture quality, stuttering audio, and the general awkwardness of talking to screens have always been features of the video chat experience.
  • While I do remember trying FaceTime when it launched, until the pandemic, I never actually wanted to video chat rather than talk on the phone or over text, especially in my personal life.
  • Most of the major tech companies have now built their own video chat platforms, with the most prominent ones, like Google Meet and Microsoft Teams, aimed at business customers.
  • During the pandemic, we’ve all started relying on video chat technology for health care, religion, entertainment, and simply keeping up with friends.
  • That explains my initial surprise when the folks from Microsoft Teams started telling me how their workplace software had taken on new roles, like social networking, in many users’ lives.

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The Big Tech antitrust report has one big conclusion: Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google are anti-competitive

  • A long-awaited report from top Democratic congressional lawmakers about the dominance of the four biggest tech giants had a clear message on Tuesday: Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google engage in a range of anti-competitive behavior, and US antitrust laws need an overhaul to allow for more competition in the US internet economy.
  • With Amazon accounting for nearly 40 percent of all e-commerce sales in the US — making it more than seven times larger in this arena than No. 2 Walmart — the Democrats’ report argues that the tech giant has used its powerful position in anti-competitive ways.
  • The Democrats’ report argues that Google has a monopoly in the online search and marketing industry, creating an “ecosystem of interlocking monopolies” — which it has maintained through anti-competitive practices in two key ways.

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How COVID-19 could end rush hour, even if people keep driving - Business Insider

  • During Business Insider's Tuesday IGNITION: Transportation panel, senior editor Alex Davies spoke with Gary Hallgren, president of mobility data and analytics company Arity, and Meera Joshi, principal at urban design firm Sam Schwartz and former chair and CEO of New York City's Taxi and Limousine Commission.
  • As much of the United States went into lockdown in March, the company statewide driving decrease by as much as 70% as people obeyed lockdown measures and stayed home.
  • The risk of collisions has fallen, likely due to fewer cars being on the road, but the crashes that do happen are more severe because people are driving faster.
  • Hallgren and Joshi agree that the pandemic has forced both people and companies to take a hard look at how commuting works.

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How COVID-19 could end rush hour, even if people keep driving - Business Insider

  • During Business Insider's Tuesday IGNITION: Transportation panel, senior editor Alex Davies spoke with Gary Hallgren, president of mobility data and analytics company Arity, and Meera Joshi, principal at urban design firm Sam Schwartz and former chair and CEO of New York City's Taxi and Limousine Commission.
  • As much of the United States went into lockdown in March, the company statewide driving decrease by as much as 70% as people obeyed lockdown measures and stayed home.
  • The risk of collisions has fallen, likely due to fewer cars being on the road, but the crashes that do happen are more severe because people are driving faster.
  • Hallgren and Joshi agree that the pandemic has forced both people and companies to take a hard look at how commuting works.

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