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Articles related to "computers"


Secretive High-Speed Trading Firm Hits Jackpot With TikTok

  • Based on private trades of ByteDance shares earlier this year, Susquehanna is sitting on a stake that could be worth more than $15 billion on paper, according to data firm PitchBook.
  • Susquehanna got into ByteDance early, joining a $5 million investing round in 2012, the year the Chinese company was founded, according to PitchBook.
  • People close to ByteDance say the driving force behind the investment was a pair of local executives at Susquehanna’s China venture-capital unit, SIG Asia Investments: Tim Gong, who has led the unit, and Joan Wang, who was a big early supporter of ByteDance founder Zhang Yiming.
  • Wang, an early ByteDance board member, connected potential investors to Mr. Zhang, says Hong Chen, chief executive of Hina Group, a Chinese investment bank and investing firm.

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Secretive High-Speed Trading Firm Hits Jackpot With TikTok

  • Based on private trades of ByteDance shares earlier this year, Susquehanna is sitting on a stake that could be worth more than $15 billion on paper, according to data firm PitchBook.
  • Susquehanna got into ByteDance early, joining a $5 million investing round in 2012, the year the Chinese company was founded, according to PitchBook.
  • People close to ByteDance say the driving force behind the investment was a pair of local executives at Susquehanna’s China venture-capital unit, SIG Asia Investments: Tim Gong, who has led the unit, and Joan Wang, who was a big early supporter of ByteDance founder Zhang Yiming.
  • Wang, an early ByteDance board member, connected potential investors to Mr. Zhang, says Hong Chen, chief executive of Hina Group, a Chinese investment bank and investing firm.

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Learning from Audio: Fourier Transformations

  • In Wave Forms, we looked at what waves are, how to visualize them, and how to deal with null data.
  • In this article, I aim to develop an intuition on what the Fourier Transformation is, why it is useful when studying audio, show mathematical proofs to make it computationally efficient, and visualize the results.
  • The DFT has some nice properties that allow for computational ease, known as the Fast Fourier Transformation.
  • In the Discrete Fourier Transformation, you are dealing with a sum of products x, and omega.
  • In this article, you now should be able to extract the Fourier Transformation of any complex signal of any type and find its unique fingerprint.
  • Stay tuned for upcoming articles as they will look at deeper processing and visualization techniques that allow us to learn even more from audio.

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Learning from Audio: Fourier Transformations

  • In Wave Forms, we looked at what waves are, how to visualize them, and how to deal with null data.
  • In this article, I aim to develop an intuition on what the Fourier Transformation is, why it is useful when studying audio, show mathematical proofs to make it computationally efficient, and visualize the results.
  • The DFT has some nice properties that allow for computational ease, known as the Fast Fourier Transformation.
  • In the Discrete Fourier Transformation, you are dealing with a sum of products x, and omega.
  • In this article, you now should be able to extract the Fourier Transformation of any complex signal of any type and find its unique fingerprint.
  • Stay tuned for upcoming articles as they will look at deeper processing and visualization techniques that allow us to learn even more from audio.

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Learning from Audio: Fourier Transformations

  • In Wave Forms, we looked at what waves are, how to visualize them, and how to deal with null data.
  • In this article, I aim to develop an intuition on what the Fourier Transformation is, why it is useful when studying audio, show mathematical proofs to make it computationally efficient, and visualize the results.
  • The DFT has some nice properties that allow for computational ease, known as the Fast Fourier Transformation.
  • In the Discrete Fourier Transformation, you are dealing with a sum of products x, and omega.
  • In this article, you now should be able to extract the Fourier Transformation of any complex signal of any type and find its unique fingerprint.
  • Stay tuned for upcoming articles as they will look at deeper processing and visualization techniques that allow us to learn even more from audio.

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What is computation?

  • The billions of calculations per second that computers perform have two kinds, the ones (1) built-in to the languages and the ones (2) you define as a programmer (written programs).
  • Similar to recipes for baking a cake or cooking up a meal, computers follow a recipe, which is a sequence of steps that has a flow of control process that specifies when each of these steps is executed and a way to determine when to stop.
  • How this applies to programming languages is when programming, one might write code which is syntactically correct but semantically wrong, which results in errors and in some cases, produce results that were not the intention of the programmer.
  • As novel technology like self-driving cars, Neuralink Brain-Computer Interfaces, space exploration, biotechnology like CRISPR, and Gene Editing, the field of AI and Machine Learning will play a huge role, and to dive into those fields, you first must get the basics of computer science right.

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What is computation?

  • The billions of calculations per second that computers perform have two kinds, the ones (1) built-in to the languages and the ones (2) you define as a programmer (written programs).
  • Similar to recipes for baking a cake or cooking up a meal, computers follow a recipe, which is a sequence of steps that has a flow of control process that specifies when each of these steps is executed and a way to determine when to stop.
  • How this applies to programming languages is when programming, one might write code which is syntactically correct but semantically wrong, which results in errors and in some cases, produce results that were not the intention of the programmer.
  • As novel technology like self-driving cars, Neuralink Brain-Computer Interfaces, space exploration, biotechnology like CRISPR, and Gene Editing, the field of AI and Machine Learning will play a huge role, and to dive into those fields, you first must get the basics of computer science right.

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The Google Pixel couldn’t win at the high end, but the midrange isn’t any easier

  • The midrange market Google is presumably headed towards has recently filled up with competitors that either beat the Pixel 5’s rumored price, beat it on rumored specs, or both.
  • Besides, Google has struggled to credibly compete in the flagship market, where phones cost well over a thousand bucks and are packed with every spec and feature you can think of.
  • When it comes to driving computing forward and guiding the ecosystem, I don’t think the Pixel makes a strong case right now.
  • And in fact, Nexus phones regularly “drove computing forward” by showcasing how Android could work on new chips and I think also served to “guide the ecosystem” better than the Pixel does today.
  • I also hope that when it comes to the grades Google is earning on Pichai’s three hardware goals, the Pixel 5 isn’t the final exam.

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D-Wave releases its next-generation quantum annealing chip

  • Today, quantum computing company D-Wave is announcing the availability of its next-generation quantum annealer, a specialized processor that uses quantum effects to solve optimization and minimization problems.
  • The hardware itself isn't much of a surprise—D-Wave was discussing its details months ago—but D-Wave talked with Ars about the challenges of building a chip with over a million individual quantum devices.
  • Quantum computers being built by companies like Google and IBM are general-purpose, gate-based machines.
  • This idea matches D-Wave's hardware pretty well, since it's much easier to add qubits to a quantum annealer; the company's current offering has 2,000 of them.
  • While errors in a gate-based quantum computer typically result in a useless output, failures on a D-Wave machine usually mean the answer it returns is low-energy, but not the lowest.
  • As mentioned above, problems are structured as a specific configuration of connections among the machine's qubits.

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D-Wave launches its 5,000+ qubit Advantage system

  • D-Wave today announced the launch of its new Advantage quantum computers.
  • These new systems, with over 5,000 qubits and 15-way qubit connectivity, are now available in the company’s Leap cloud computing platform.
  • That’s up from about 2,000 qubits in the previous system, which featured six-way connectivity.
  • Using Leap’s hybrid solver, which combines classic CPUs and GPUs with the company’s quantum system, users can now solve significantly more complex problems, thanks to both the higher qubit and connection count.
  • One of the companies using the system today for protein design is Menten AI.
  • The other new product the company is launching is D-Wave Launch, a new white-glove service to help enterprises get started with quantum computing.
  • D-Wave will pair up businesses with experts in a given area — and from partners like Accenture — to ensure that these users are successful.

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