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Articles related to "court"


A man who was sentenced to life in prison for selling $30 of marijuana will be freed

  • Initially, Harris was convicted and sentenced to 15 years in prison, according to the Louisiana Supreme Court.
  • Prosecutors in Vermilion Parish agreed to release Harris from prison after the Louisiana Supreme Court granted him a new hearing last month, said his lawyer Cormac Boyle.
  • The Louisiana Supreme Court agreed with Harris' argument claiming he had "ineffective assistance of counsel at sentencing on post-conviction review." The matter was sent back to the trial court for an evidentiary writ.
  • The District Attorney's office agreed that Harris "received ineffective assistance at sentencing and was entitled to a lesser sentence," Boyle said in a statement.
  • He also said that the trial court imposed a life sentence when the multiple offender bill was passed.
  • Another decision by the Louisiana Supreme Court last week was roundly criticized: Justices voted to uphold a man's life sentence for stealing hedge clippers.

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An Indian royal was shot dead by police in broad daylight. Now, 35 years later, his killers have been jailed

  • Raja Man Singh's family -- part of a centuries-old royal lineage -- claimed he had been killed in a premeditated murder plot ordered by the highest politician in the state.
  • The following day, the Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Shiv Charan Mathur, the highest elected official in the state, held a rally in support of Man Singh's opponent.
  • According to Vijay Singh, police made no attempt to arrest Man Singh after the incident, although a police report filed that day accused him of attempted murder.
  • In its court ruling last month, the CBI did not deal with Vijay Singh's claim that the chief minister -- who died in 2009 -- had ordered the killing.
  • According to lawyer Narayan Singh, it's uncommon for police to be convicted for killing a member of the public -- royal blood or not.

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Judges cite John Roberts' opinion in reversing block on Arkansas abortion laws

  • Three judges on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals opted on Friday to remove a district court's temporary block on the Arkansas laws "in light of Chief Justice Roberts's separate opinion in June Medical" and another prior court case.
  • While the lower court in striking down the restrictions held that courts, not legislatures, must resolve questions of medical uncertainty, Roberts in the superseding Supreme Court case, "emphasized the 'wide discretion' that courts must afford to legislatures in areas of medical uncertainty," the judges said.
  • CNN Supreme Court analyst and professor at the University of Texas School of Law Stephen Vladeck said at the time that Roberts suggested that he did not necessarily endorse the analysis of the 2016 decision, which focused as much on whether the restrictions actually provided benefits to pregnant women as on whether they imposed an undue burden.

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Behind the Beirut Explosion: Seven Years of Official Neglect

  • The cargo, a chemical compound used for blasting mines and building car bombs, was seized when the ship carrying it was found unseaworthy and its owner failed to pay certain fees, according to the ship’s captain and the International Transport Workers’ Federation, a global trade union.
  • Port officials didn’t heed court orders to safely store the ammonium nitrate, but instead sought permission to unload the chemicals, according to court documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.
  • But Mr. Grechushkin, the Rhosus’s owner, told the captain that he had no money to fund the journey through the Suez Canal to Africa so the ship would have to pick up extra cargo in Beirut, Mr. Prokoshev said.
  • But Lebanese authorities refused to clear it, saying that the ship wouldn’t be able to carry the heavy new load, according to the captain and Ms. Ananina, the official with the International Transport Workers’ Federation.

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Former Angels official faces federal drug charge related to the overdose death of pitcher Tyler Skaggs

  • He died by choking on vomit after using drugs and alcohol, according to the Tarrant County Medical Examiner's Office.
  • The Drug Enforcement Administration's investigation also found that Kay allegedly regularly dealt pills of fentanyl -- dubbed "blue boys" for their blue coloring -- to Skaggs and others in the Angels organization at the stadium where they worked, affidavit in support of the criminal complaint alleges.
  • CNN has reached out to an attorney for Eric Kay as well as the Tarrant County Sheriff's Office for a comment but did not immediately hear back.
  • However, last year, Kay's attorney, Michael Molfetta, confirmed to CNN that the former team spokesman was cooperating with the DEA.
  • The Angels said the organization has worked with law enforcement and hired an independent investigator to look into Skaggs's death.

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Appeals court rules 10¢-a-page charge for court documents is too high

  • PACER, short for Public Access to Court Electronic Records, is an online system that allows members of the public (including Ars Technica reporters) to download documents related to almost any federal court case.
  • The class action lawsuit, filed on behalf of almost everyone who pays PACER fees, argued that the courts were only allowed to charge enough to offset the costs of running PACER.
  • According to the three-judge panel, the judiciary has latitude to spend PACER fees on any project that's somehow related to distributing electronic docket information to the general public.
  • So we can expect the plaintiffs in the case to argue that CM/ECF should be paid for some other way—perhaps by charging higher fees to litigants or by having Congress appropriate money from general tax revenues.

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Judge rules E. Jean Carroll can continue to seek Trump's DNA in defamation suit

  • New York (CNN) - A New York state Supreme Court judge on Thursday denied President Donald Trump's effort to delay the proceedings in a defamation lawsuit filed against him by longtime magazine columnist E.
  • In her ruling, Justice Verna Saunders wrote that a recent Supreme Court decision regarding Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance's subpoena for Trump's financial records demonstrates that a state court can exercise jurisdiction over a sitting President, meaning Carroll's case against Trump should be allowed to proceed.
  • But lawyers for Carroll said Trump shouldn't be allowed to delay the case in light of the fact that he has both continued to handle other cases as a defendant while serving as President and has also continued to file lawsuits.

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House can subpoena former White House counsel to testify, appeals court rules

  • A divided US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit said McGahn's refusal to testify is grounds for the House to sue.
  • The ruling is a win for Congress as a whole, emphasizing that it can sue to take an administration to court when there's a standoff between the branches, and a loss for the Trump administration's attempt to expand executive powers.
  • But in letting McGahn continue to challenge the subpoena on other grounds, the practical impact is that the court case is ongoing and he may not have to testify before the election.
  • This story is breaking and will be updated.

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Inside the Walmart suit at the center of Netflix's 'Kings of America' - Business Insider

  • The lawsuit, filed in 2001, claimed that Walmart systematically underpaid and under-promoted women in its thousands of stores across the US.
  • The person whom Netflix describes as a "longtime saleswoman and preacher," meanwhile, can be none other than Betty Dukes, the lead plaintiff in the Walmart case, who claimed she was underpaid and disciplined on the basis of her gender.
  • The lawsuit led by Dukes alleged widespread discriminatory practices at Walmart, with claims of male managers yelling at female workers, passing over them for promotions, and paying them less than their male counterparts.
  • In the 2011 Supreme Court decision, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote that the lawsuit did not provide enough evidence that every plaintiff had suffered discrimination in the same way.
  • Netflix said Amy Adams will star as one of the lead women in the series and executive produce.

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Inside the Walmart suit at the center of Netflix's 'Kings of America' - Business Insider

  • The lawsuit, filed in 2001, claimed that Walmart systematically underpaid and under-promoted women in its thousands of stores across the US.
  • The person whom Netflix describes as a "longtime saleswoman and preacher," meanwhile, can be none other than Betty Dukes, the lead plaintiff in the Walmart case, who claimed she was underpaid and disciplined on the basis of her gender.
  • The lawsuit led by Dukes alleged widespread discriminatory practices at Walmart, with claims of male managers yelling at female workers, passing over them for promotions, and paying them less than their male counterparts.
  • In the 2011 Supreme Court decision, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote that the lawsuit did not provide enough evidence that every plaintiff had suffered discrimination in the same way.
  • Netflix said Amy Adams will star as one of the lead women in the series and executive produce.

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