Sign Up Now!

Sign up and get personalized intelligence briefing delivered daily.


Sign Up

Articles related to "end"


The Best Frameworks to Build a Minimum Viable Product

  • We'll look at the best frameworks to build your minimum viable product currently.
  • You can build a minimum viable product with a decent interactive front end with some frameworks and libraries.
  • React is very popular as a front end library because we can build a lot with it in a short time.
  • We can use it to build a UI quickly with all the libraries that are available.
  • To make building back ends easy, we can use frameworks to do this.
  • You have to add your own database manipulation solution and it doesn't come with any way to debug things easily on its own, so it's good for simple apps, which a minimum viable product should be.
  • To create a minimum viable product, we've to use frameworks to build a prototype fast.
  • It's good to stick with the popular frameworks that let us build things fast.

save | comments | report | share on


US bond yields reset lower, ASX to drop

  • European shares ended at their lowest in nearly two months on Tuesday as concerns over a coronavirus pandemic roiled markets which had already marked enormous losses in the prior session.
  • Japan's Nikkei share average fell to a four-month low on Tuesday, as investors reduced their equity holdings on their first trade after a long weekend and as a spike in coronavirus cases beyond mainland China threatened the global economy.
  • Losses in China stocks, which ended lower on Tuesday, were capped as investors expected the coronavirus contagion outside China to have a limited impact on the Chinese market.
  • China's iron ore futures snapped a 10-day winning streak on Tuesday on fears that the fast-spreading coronavirus could turn into a pandemic and further disrupt businesses and hurt the global economy.
  • The pan-European STOXX 600 index ended 1.8% lower, extending losses since Friday's close to more than $1 trillion.

save | comments | report | share on


Amazon is expanding its cashierless Go model into a full-blown grocery store

  • The new store, which The Verge toured late last week, is indeed modeled after a standard Amazon Go location, but it has been expanded to include a wide array of grocery items you’d find at, say, Amazon-owned Whole Foods.
  • Amazon says the store combines the product availability and low prices of a grocery chain like Publix or Walmart with the convenience and quick shopping times of its Go model, with a selection that includes both big mainstream brands and local, organic produce.
  • That’s because not only do a majority of people buy fresh food in person from grocery stores, they also use those same trips to buy household goods, alcohol, and a number of other products that a company like Amazon could more easily sell in-store than online.

save | comments | report | share on


Fuchsia Programming Language Policy

  • This document describes which programming languages the Fuchsia project uses and supports for production software on the target device, both within the Fuchsia Platform Source Tree and for end-developers building for Fuchsia outside the Fuchsia Source Platform Tree.
  • For example, this policy does not apply to zxdb (a debugger) because zxdb is a developer tool; the policy does apply to pkgfs because pkgfs (a file system) executes in the normal, end-user operation of the device.
  • The Fuchsia Platform Source Tree can absorb larger changes to the Fuchsia system and its underlying technologies than end-developers because changes that impact only the Fuchsia Platform Source Tree can be executed without coordination with other groups of people.
  • End-developers are people who write software for Fuchsia outside of the Fuchsia Platform Source Tree.

save | comments | report | share on


Free and Fake APIs You Can Use to Practice Front End Development

  • To practice front end development, we often need to practice making HTTP requests to APIs. To do this easily, we can use APIs that are already built so we can focus on front-end development instead of writing our own APIs to practice with.
  • The Dog API is free and it provides us with endpoints for dog pictures and text data.
  • It supports CORS so that we can use it directly from our front end apps.
  • This API also supports CORS so we can use it from the front end.
  • There's a REST API that supports CORS in addition to libraries made for various platforms like Python, Ruby, and JavaScript.
  • This provides an API with GET, POST, PUT, and DELETE requests and it supports CORS.
  • Like JSONPlaceholder, this provides a real API for you to build front-ends on.
  • To focus on front end development practice, you can use these APIs to develop your practice front end app.

save | comments | report | share on


Understanding Recursion

  • Notice that the function keeps Incepting until it reaches fib(1) or fib(0), which are terminating cases.
  • And if our input is greater than 1, then we need to work towards our terminating cases (of 0 or 1) by Incepting towards them via a sequence of recursive function calls like we did above.
  • Because of the way we structured our dictionaries, the terminating case is pretty simple: if we see a list (or a single value) we can just append the contents and move on.
  • One thing to keep in mind is that if you have an extremely complicated tree with many layers and many branches, then traversing it recursively may take a really long time.
  • Notice that we need to provide two inputs — result, which is returned, and path, which is an intermediate output that gets appended to result (but not returned at the end of the function).

save | comments | report | share on


Understanding Recursion

  • Notice that the function keeps Incepting until it reaches fib(1) or fib(0), which are terminating cases.
  • And if our input is greater than 1, then we need to work towards our terminating cases (of 0 or 1) by Incepting towards them via a sequence of recursive function calls like we did above.
  • Because of the way we structured our dictionaries, the terminating case is pretty simple: if we see a list (or a single value) we can just append the contents and move on.
  • One thing to keep in mind is that if you have an extremely complicated tree with many layers and many branches, then traversing it recursively may take a really long time.
  • Notice that we need to provide two inputs — result, which is returned, and path, which is an intermediate output that gets appended to result (but not returned at the end of the function).

save | comments | report | share on


Understanding Recursion

  • Notice that the function keeps Incepting until it reaches fib(1) or fib(0), which are terminating cases.
  • And if our input is greater than 1, then we need to work towards our terminating cases (of 0 or 1) by Incepting towards them via a sequence of recursive function calls like we did above.
  • Because of the way we structured our dictionaries, the terminating case is pretty simple: if we see a list (or a single value) we can just append the contents and move on.
  • One thing to keep in mind is that if you have an extremely complicated tree with many layers and many branches, then traversing it recursively may take a really long time.
  • Notice that we need to provide two inputs — result, which is returned, and path, which is an intermediate output that gets appended to result (but not returned at the end of the function).

save | comments | report | share on


Understanding Recursion

  • Notice that the function keeps Incepting until it reaches fib(1) or fib(0), which are terminating cases.
  • And if our input is greater than 1, then we need to work towards our terminating cases (of 0 or 1) by Incepting towards them via a sequence of recursive function calls like we did above.
  • Because of the way we structured our dictionaries, the terminating case is pretty simple: if we see a list (or a single value) we can just append the contents and move on.
  • One thing to keep in mind is that if you have an extremely complicated tree with many layers and many branches, then traversing it recursively may take a really long time.
  • Notice that we need to provide two inputs — result, which is returned, and path, which is an intermediate output that gets appended to result (but not returned at the end of the function).

save | comments | report | share on


Understanding Recursion

  • Notice that the function keeps Incepting until it reaches fib(1) or fib(0), which are terminating cases.
  • And if our input is greater than 1, then we need to work towards our terminating cases (of 0 or 1) by Incepting towards them via a sequence of recursive function calls like we did above.
  • Because of the way we structured our dictionaries, the terminating case is pretty simple: if we see a list (or a single value) we can just append the contents and move on.
  • One thing to keep in mind is that if you have an extremely complicated tree with many layers and many branches, then traversing it recursively may take a really long time.
  • Notice that we need to provide two inputs — result, which is returned, and path, which is an intermediate output that gets appended to result (but not returned at the end of the function).

save | comments | report | share on