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Articles related to "food"


The Cheese Makers Keeping Monterey Jack’s Local Legend Alive

  • Three: It was a Swiss-Italian California dairy man named Domingo Pedrazzi, who also made a jack-pressed cheese in the late 1800s, which he sold under the name Del Monte Cheese.
  • That included many dairies making country cheese, including Dona Boronda’s well-regarded queso del país, which he started marketing and exporting around the country possibly on her behalf, probably with his name and “Monterey” on the boxes, so it eventually became known as Monterey Jack.
  • Cheese making is brand-new for Schoch’s family, who produce both regular and aged Monterey Jack, plus many other artisan rounds of Schoch’s own creation.
  • (He originally thought about growing grapes and making wine, until he realized his family already grew cows.) The Schochs also make Swiss-style stirred raw-milk yogurt and bottle some of their own milk to be sold at local grocery stores and food shops along with their cheeses.

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A Bay Area startup is working to make 'air meat' using protein-producing microbes discovered by NASA

  • Alternative meat products can mimic a juicy, bleeding burger or simulate crispy bacon, but they often rely on soy or pea protein to get the job done.
  • The company, appropriately named Air Protein, uses a technique discovered by NASA to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into protein the same way plants do.
  • Its CEO, Lisa Dyson, thinks that process will be less deleterious to natural resources than other plant-based meat alternatives.
  • The researchers found a class of microbes called hydrogenotrophs that convert CO2 into protein in the form of a flavorless powder.
  • For now, Air Protein is focused on using the powder to develop a meat alternative.
  • A Finnish company called Solar Foods is experimenting with a similar powder that can be used to make protein supplements or veggie burgers.
  • Another startup called Calaysta is using carbon from natural gas to make a protein that can feed fish, livestock, and household pets.

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Startup makes 'air meat' using microbes that turn CO2 into protein - Business Insider

  • Alternative meat products can mimic a juicy, bleeding burger or simulate crispy bacon, but they often rely on soy or pea protein to get the job done.
  • The company, appropriately named Air Protein, uses a technique discovered by NASA to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into protein the same way plants do.
  • Its CEO, Lisa Dyson, thinks that process will be less deleterious to natural resources than other plant-based meat alternatives.
  • The researchers found a class of microbes called hydrogenotrophs that convert CO2 into protein in the form of a flavorless powder.
  • For now, Air Protein is focused on using the powder to develop a meat alternative.
  • A Finnish company called Solar Foods is experimenting with a similar powder that can be used to make protein supplements or veggie burgers.
  • Another startup called Calaysta is using carbon from natural gas to make a protein that can feed fish, livestock, and household pets.

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Can employee activism change Google? Revisiting the employee walkout one year later.

  • November 1 marks one year since the Google Walkout For Real Change when nearly 20,000 employees in 50 cities left their offices at exactly 11:10 am around the world in a coordinated protest against the company’s alleged abuse of power.
  • Later in the episode, former Google employee Liz Fong-Jones explains why she quit her job as an engineer there, how the organization changed in the 11 years she worked at Google, and what she’s doing now to make sure workers’ voices are actually being heard.
  • With the negative press about retaliation at Google, do you think the company is concerned about worker retention?
  • I think that that’s going to be the thing that actually causes Google to have to change the way it does business.

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Nestlé and Carrefour just put baby milk formula on the blockchain

  • Global food giant Nestlé has teamed up with French supermarket chain Carrefour to put baby milk formula on the blockchain.
  • IBM Food Trust is based on the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger Fabric software.
  • Like other blockchain-enabled products, consumers will be able to access this information by scanning a QR-code printed on the product’s packaging.
  • Earlier this year, Carrefour revealed its intention to put at least 20 percent of its “in-house” products on the blockchain by 2020.
  • Around the same time, China’s popular online retailer JD.com announced that sales of its free-range chickens had doubled in two years, and attributed blockchain-enabled QR-codes to at least some of that success.
  • Other major supermarkets have been ‘blockchainifying’ their products, too.
  • Auchan sells carrots that are on the blockchain, while Dutch supermarket Albert Heijn has used the technology to render the supply routes of its orange juice totally transparent.

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Wendy's is giving away free food in honor of its 50th birthday — here's how to get some

  • Wendy's is turning 50 and celebrating with free food.
  • Customers who download the Wendy's app can use the scanner tool on any Wendy's cup or takeout bag that comes with a purchase.
  • This will unlock free menu items that can be redeemed on another trip to Wendy's and can include a cheeseburger, fries, a frosty, and more, Thrillist reported.
  • The chain tweeted about the promotion on Monday.
  • The chain also launched a limited-edition Birthday Cake Frosty and Birthday Cake Frosty Cookie Sundae at participating Wendy's locations in honor of its 50th anniversary on Friday.
  • Wendy's was founded on November 15, 1969 in Columbus, Ohio.
  • Today, there are more than 6,700 Wendy's locations across the world.

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Gut bacteria: How bats 'shift the paradigm'

  • A recent investigation into the microbiome of bats finds that they follow different rules to other mammals.
  • Scientists are finding increasing evidence that our gut bacteria might play a part in a range of health conditions.
  • Because gut bacteria have lived in tandem with mammals throughout evolutionary time, they have evolved together.
  • In the current study, the scientists found that even closely related bat species have significantly different microbiomes.
  • The best predictor of the types of bacteria found in a bat species' gut was where it lives.
  • In other words, if two bats of the same species lived in different locations where they had access to different foods, their microbiome would be very different.
  • Compared with other mammals of a similar size, bats have a short gut, which means they carry less intestinal tissue and less food.

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Cats Cannot Taste Sweets

  • Our feline friends are only interested in one thing: meat (except for saving up the energy to catch it by napping, or a round of restorative petting) This is not just because inside every domestic tabby lurks a killer just waiting to catch a bird or torture a mouse, it is also because cats lack the ability to taste sweetness, unlike every other mammal examined to date.
  • When working properly, the two genes form the coupled protein and when something sweet enters the mouth the news is rushed to the brain, primarily because sweetness is a sign of rich carbohydrates—an important food source for plant-eaters and the nondiscriminating, like humans.
  • So far, cats are alone among mammals in lacking the sweet gene; even close relatives among the meat-eaters like hyenas and mongooses have it.

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Trader Joe's exec says the chain's new Chocolate Lava Gnocchi are so good they can be eaten for dinner

  • Trader Joe's just released a new product that's already making waves: Chocolate Lava Gnocchi.
  • Described as "sweet chocolate gnocchi with a molten chocolate core," the small balls of chocolate do indeed contain potato puree, creating a divide among fans of the grocery store chain.
  • While it may seem strange to combine the savory flavors of potato with sweet, molten chocolate and hazelnut, many of TJ's most devoted followers are already anxious to get their hands on the divisive new item.
  • Upon spying the store's chocolate gnocchi, she asked Trader Joe's own gnocchi supplier if they could make something similar.
  • While the verdict may be out on whether potato gnocchi filled with melted chocolate qualifies as a dinner, rather than a dessert, we can't say we aren't intrigued.
  • Trader Joe's Chocolate Lava Gnocchi cost $2.99 per bag and have 300 calories in every one-cup serving.

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1 in 3 Americans are at risk of lactose intolerance. A pair of millennial women invented an ice cream just for them, and now their bootstrapped dessert is in 1000 stores, including Whole Foods.

  • Brands like Lactaid and Breyers weren't a suitable substitute, so she teamed up with college friend Gwen Burlingame to invent a premium ice cream made with all-natural ingredients and no lactose.
  • They named the resulting product Minus the Moo and sold at local farmers markets for 2 years while each worked full-time jobs in medicine and corporate marketing.
  • Boston's entrepreneurship scene is home to many highly competitive pitch contests, and Flannery and Burlingame won several, including pitch slams with NOSH, the Natural Organic Sustainable Healthy food industry group, and Sam Adams' Brewing the American Dream.
  • Flannery sees parallels between her time working in intensive-care and starting a business.
  • Having perfected their recipe for lactose-free ice cream, Flannery and Burlingame say their business offers something that can't be easily replicated.

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