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Articles related to "francisco"


Plastic water bottles are banned at San Francisco Airport starting this week — here's what you need to know

  • Starting on Tuesday, travelers through San Francisco International Airport had to plan to cut a major part of the pre-flight routine: buying a big water bottle to stay hydrated during the flight.
  • That's because as of August 20, San Francisco Airport banned the sale of single-use plastic water bottles, the first known rule of its kind at a major US airport.
  • Instead, the airport is offering more than 100 "hydration stations" where travelers can fill reusable water bottles before their flights — after they've gone through security.
  • Shops at the airport will sell reusable water bottles for travelers who don't have them.
  • The prohibition comes from a 2014 San Francisco city ordinance banning the sale of plastic water bottles on city-owned property.
  • Before the ban, vendors in the airport sold around 10,000 water bottles each day and generated 28 million pounds of waste each year, according to Yakel.

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DigitalOcean launches managed MySQL and Redis database services

  • Half a year after launching its managed PostgreSQL service, upstart hosting and cloud services platform DigitalOcean today announced the launch of its managed MySQL and Redis database offerings, too.
  • Like most of the company’s latest releases, this move exemplifies DigitalOcean’s ambition to move beyond its discount hosting roots and to become a more fully-fledged cloud provider.
  • Besides the database service and its core hosting products and infrastructure, the company now offers object and block storage and a Kubernetes engine, which itself can be used to run virtually any modern piece of cloud infrastructure.
  • As the company notes, it selected MySQL and Redis because of popular demand from its developer community and it will do so for other engines as well.
  • MySQL and Redis were the only services on DigitalOcean’s roadmap for 2019, though, so I don’t expect we’ll see any additional releases before the end of the year.

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The world’s oldest webcam is shutting down after a quarter of a century

  • FogCam, which is believed to be the oldest webcam on the internet, will be shut down at the end of August after 25 years of near-continuous operation.
  • Jeff Schwartz and Dan Wong, who set up the webcam while students at San Francisco State University back in 1994, announced the decision via Twitter, where they thanked their viewers and the university for their support over the years.
  • In an interview with SFGate, Schwartz provided more details on the decision to take the webcam offline.
  • “The bottom line is that we no longer have a really good view or place to put the camera,” he said, “The university tolerates us, but they don’t really endorse us and so we have to find secure locations on our own.” Although the webcam feed will be gone, the site it’s hosted on will stay online “for sake of posterity,” he said.

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A 125-year-old dime just sold for $1.32 million

  • It wasn't just any 10-cent piece; the 1894-S Barber Dime is one of only 24 that were ever made, according to Stack's Bowers Galleries, which held the auction Thursday night.
  • Hansen is an avid coin collector and is working toward a collection that includes an example of every coin ever made by the US Mint from 1792 to the present, said John Brush, president of David Lawrence Rare Coins, who is helping Hansen curate his collection and was in Chicago to bid on the dime.
  • Brush said Hansen needs only six coins to complete his collection, but they are not available for sale.
  • Barber, who designed many coins for US Mints.
  • The coins were struck at the San Francisco Mint on June 9, 1894, the Professional Coin Grading Service said in a statement.

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Bernie Sanders wants to stop police from using facial recognition software

  • New York (CNN Business) - A criminal justice plan from presidential candidate Bernie Sanders would ban police from using facial recognition software.
  • The Democratic senator and 2020 hopeful also called for a pause of the use of algorithmic assessment tools in the criminal justice system until they are audited.
  • In May, San Francisco banned police and local government departments from using facial recognition technology — becoming the first city in the United States to do so.
  • San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin, who introduced the city's bill, told CNN Business earlier this year that the technology is "so fundamentally invasive" that it shouldn't be used.
  • While San Francisco banned the use of facial recognition systems by local authorities, federally controlled facilities, like San Francisco International Airport, are exempt.
  • Supporters of police use of the technology say it can be an important tool in fighting crime.

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Original Content podcast: Netflix's 'Wu Assassins' is a punching, kicking delight

  • First, there’s the fact that Indonesian martial arts star Iko Uwais (who you might recognize from “The Raid” and “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”) plays as Kai — he’s not a great dramatic actor, but once the action starts, he becomes a blur of punches and kicks.
  • The producers have surrounded Uwais with other other accomplished martial artists, so the resulting fight scenes are extraordinary.
  • “Wu Assassins” includes a couple big set pieces, but even more remarkably, every single fight (and there are plenty) feels like it’s been choreographed for the perfect mix of beauty and brutality.
  • Even better, there’s Byron Mann’s performance as Uncle Six, a ruthless triad boss who has a long history with Kai. Mann brings real charisma and humanity to his performance, and he turns his dramatic scenes with Uwais into absolute highlight of the show.

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Data-Driven Decisions for Where to Park in SF

  • In particular, have you ever parked in San Francisco and wondered, if I measured the average inverse square distance to every vehicle incident recorded by the SFPD in the last year, at what percentile would my current location fall?
  • We’ll wrap this all in a simple mobile web app, so in you can open it from your car, press a button, and get a percentile of how secure your parking spot is.
  • For this task, we’ll load the SFPD data into a Rockset collection and query it upon a user clicking the button.
  • Now that we have all vehicle incidents in the last year, let’s see if we can calculate the security score for San Francisco City Hall, which has a latitude of 37.7793° N and longitude of 122.4193° W.

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Data-Driven Decisions for Where to Park in SF

  • In particular, have you ever parked in San Francisco and wondered, if I measured the average inverse square distance to every vehicle incident recorded by the SFPD in the last year, at what percentile would my current location fall?
  • We’ll wrap this all in a simple mobile web app, so in you can open it from your car, press a button, and get a percentile of how secure your parking spot is.
  • For this task, we’ll load the SFPD data into a Rockset collection and query it upon a user clicking the button.
  • Now that we have all vehicle incidents in the last year, let’s see if we can calculate the security score for San Francisco City Hall, which has a latitude of 37.7793° N and longitude of 122.4193° W.

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House Prices Drop Again in San Francisco and Silicon Valley

  • In the San Francisco Bay Area overall, house prices dropped again in July compared to July last year.
  • They dropped in eight of the nine counties on a year-over-year basis: Silicon Valley (Santa Clara and San Mateo), San Francisco, Marin, the Wine Country of Napa and Sonoma, and the East Bay (Alameda and Contra Costa).
  • These prices get less dizzying the more time the commute to San Francisco and Silicon Valley takes during morning rush hour.
  • In San Francisco and in Silicon Valley, house prices were supposed to explode, fueled by the lowest mortgage rates in nearly three years and by the IPO billionaires and millionaires from Uber, Lyft, and other companies that would suddenly be buying homes, a time-honored real-estate hype that had been proven wrong before (here is my take: Why the Wave of Mega-IPOs Won’t Bail Out the San Francisco & Silicon Valley Housing Bubbles).

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Y Combinator-backed Narrator wants to become the operating system for data science

  • Cedric Dussud, Michael Nason, Ahmed Elsamadisi and Matthew Star (pictured above, in order) spent the summer sharing a house in San Francisco, cooking meals together and building Narrator, a startup with ambitions of becoming a universal data model fit for any company.
  • Narrator is one of more than 100 startups graduating next week from Y Combinator, the San Francisco accelerator program.
  • The building blocks of Narrator’s subscription-based data modeling tool were developed during Elsamadisi’s WeWork tenure, where he was tasked with making sense of the company’s disorganized trove of data.
  • As an early addition to WeWork’s data team, Elsamadisi spent two years bringing WeWork’s data to one place, scaling the team to 40 people and ultimately creating a functional data model the soon-to-be-public company could use to streamline operations.

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