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Articles related to "general-news"


New York State Republican Candidates Fight Shadow of Trump

  • Republican candidates hoping to roll back gains made by New York Democrats in 2018 are trying to differentiate themselves from President Trump, who trails in polls in many districts.
  • Experts say it will be difficult for the GOP in most areas, but Republicans hope campaigns based on state issues—including a series of recent laws changing the criminal-justice system—will help them break through.
  • Mr. Astorino said his 2017 loss was largely due to anti-Trump sentiment, but in his current bid for a state Senate seat, he is arguing to bring balance to a state government that is now completely controlled by Democrats.
  • Jeanne Zaino, a professor of political science at Iona College in Westchester County, said the resonance of a local issue would be key for candidates like Mr. Astorino.

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Pandemic Fatigue Is Real—And It’s Spreading

  • Zoe Sharp, a 43-year-old human-resources leader in Washington, D.C., has been stringent with her family throughout the pandemic, sanitizing elevator buttons, airing out packages and microwaving the newspaper.
  • Weekly Gallup polls of between 2,714 and 9,353 people in the U.S. found that 91% of respondents said they had worn a mask in the past seven days as of Sept.
  • A government survey in France found that 72% of people said they were avoiding gatherings and face-to-face meetings as of mid-May, right after the country’s lockdown ended.
  • A U.K. survey found that 98% of people reported wearing a mask over a seven-day period ended Oct. 11.
  • Clémence Jujo, a 33-year-old human-resources worker, plans to travel to Lyon in November to attend a family reunion, an event that will bring her into contact with her parents and grandparents.

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Bayer to Buy Gene-Therapy Firm AskBio for Up to $4 Billion

  • The latest deal—for which Bayer will pay $2 billion now and as much as a further $2 billion based on future success milestones—is a bet on cutting-edge gene therapy, in which a functional gene is inserted to counter the effects of a disease caused by a missing or faulty gene.
  • Mr. Oelrich said it was too early to predict how much in sales the AskBio treatments are likely to generate, but added that he expects the deal to help Bayer build a leading position in gene therapy.
  • Dozens of gene therapies are now undergoing clinical trials and big drug companies have been acquiring gene-therapy firms, betting on the success of those treatments in the future.
  • PFE 2.00% bought Bamboo Therapeutics Inc. from AskBio in 2016, as Pfizer sought to boost its presence in the treatment of rare diseases.

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Facebook Prepares Measures for Possible Election Unrest

  • Facebook Inc. teams have planned for the possibility of trying to calm election-related conflict in the U.S. by deploying internal tools designed for what it calls “at-risk” countries, according to people familiar with the matter.
  • The emergency measures include slowing the spread of viral content and lowering the bar for suppressing potentially inflammatory posts, the people said.
  • Previously used in countries including Sri Lanka and Myanmar, they are part of a larger tool kit developed by Facebook to prepare for the U.S. election.

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Business on Biden: Not So Bad, Given the Alternatives

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden is running for president on the sort of platform that usually makes business sweat: higher taxes on corporations and investors, aggressive action to phase out fossil fuels, stronger unions and an expanded government role in health care.
  • Yet many business executives and their allies are greeting the prospect of a Biden presidency with either ambivalence or relief.
  • Credit that not to who Mr. Biden is, but who he isn’t: Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders, senators with a much more adversarial approach...

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Health Agency Halts Coronavirus Ad Campaign, Leaving Santa Claus in the Cold

  • A federal health agency halted a public-service coronavirus advertising campaign funded by $250 million in taxpayer money after it offered a special vaccine deal to an unusual set of essential workers: Santa Claus performers.
  • As part of the plan, a top Trump administration official wanted the Santa performers to promote the benefits of a Covid-19 vaccination and, in exchange, offered them early vaccine access ahead of the general public, according to audio recordings.
  • Those who perform as Mrs. Claus and elves also would have...

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Pope Francis Names Wilton Gregory as First Black American Cardinal

  • ROME—Pope Francis said Sunday that he would raise 13 men to the rank of cardinal, including Archbishop Wilton Gregory of Washington, D.C., who will become the first Black American to receive the honor.
  • Cardinal-designate Gregory’s promotion reinforces his standing as a major Black American leader at a time when the U.S. is debating the legacy of historic racism and many across the country are demonstrating for racial justice.
  • Archbishop Gregory became the first Black man to lead Catholics in Washington, D.C., when Pope Francis appointed him to succeed Cardinal Donald Wuerl in April 2019.
  • Theodore McCarrick, a retired archbishop of Washington, resigned from the College of Cardinals in 2018 after he was accused of sexually abusing a then-teenage boy in the 1970s.
  • Pope Francis continued his practice of choosing bishops from countries and dioceses that have rarely been represented in the College of Cardinals.

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The Case for a $700 Smartphone

  • Three phones stand out, models that are 5G compatible, wireless-charging-capable and water-resistant, and carry great cameras and big batteries.
  • Google’s Pixel phones aren’t very popular—the Android maker trails behind the likes of Samsung, Huawei and Xiaomi world-wide.
  • But it’s a fantastic Android phone, especially if you’re all-in on Google’s apps, like Gmail, Google Photos and Google Drive, and want a clean-looking version of the operating system.
  • One of the main draws of Pixel phones is getting new versions of Android more quickly than other Android devices—typically within two weeks of release.
  • The Pixel 4a models with smaller and larger screens have inferior features.
  • Samsung didn’t initially plan on releasing the “Fan Edition.” Historically, Samsung’s midtier offering was the previous year’s phone.

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Health Agency Scraps Coronavirus Ad Campaign, Leaving Santa Claus in the Cold

  • A federal health agency halted a public-service coronavirus advertising campaign funded by $250 million in taxpayer money after it offered a special vaccine deal to an unusual set of essential workers: Santa Claus performers.
  • As part of the plan, a top Trump administration official wanted the Santa performers to promote the benefits of a Covid-19 vaccination and, in exchange, offered them early vaccine access ahead of the general public, according to audio recordings.
  • Mr. Caputo contacted Mr. Erwin after he had testified at an HHS advisory meeting in late August urging early vaccinations for performers portraying Santa, Mrs. Claus and elves.
  • Mr. Caputo, who had been installed in his job by the White House, said in August that the public health effort would be an edgy media campaign featuring prominent Americans including Surgeon General Jerome Adams.

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Samsung Heir Takes Reins of Tech Giant Stuck in His Father’s Past

  • SEOUL—Few companies rode the tech industry’s hardware boom higher than Lee Kun-hee’s Samsung Electronics Co. In the 1990s, the company muscled into living rooms with flat-screen TVs and then slid into consumers’ pockets in the last decade with smartphones rivaling Apple Inc.’s iPhones.
  • His father and grandfather oversaw Samsung during the Japanese colonial period and later in the aftermath of the Korean War, leaving both with a driving hunger to succeed, said Mike Cho, a business professor at Korea University in Seoul, who has long followed Samsung as a South Korean corporate governance expert.
  • Mr. Lee’s sisters are unlikely to battle their brother for control of Samsung Electronics as chairman, though they could seek to spin off other parts of the conglomerate for themselves, said Park Sang-in, a professor at Seoul National University, who studies succession planning at South Korea’s dynastic companies.

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