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Articles related to "holiday"


US COVID-19 cases rise in 40 states, Fourth of July super-spread looms - Business Insider

  • The coronavirus is surging in 40 out of 50 US states, and with the Fourth of July holiday approaching, experts fear it may be about to get worse.
  • The Associated Press (AP) also reported on Thursday that 40 out of 50 states were trending upwards in terms of daily new cases.
  • Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading disease expert in the US, said "we're going to be in some serious difficulty" if people didn't start following government advice, according to the AP.
  • A spike in coronavirus cases was observed in early June and was blamed on people celebrating Memorial Day Weekend, and officials are keen not to repeat the event.
  • Joshua Barocas, an infectious-disease expert at the Boston Medical Center, said earlier this week that the timing of the spike and the impending holiday "set up a perfect storm," according to The Guardian.

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US COVID-19 cases rise in 40 states, Fourth of July super-spread looms - Business Insider

  • The coronavirus is surging in 40 out of 50 US states, and with the Fourth of July holiday approaching, experts fear it may be about to get worse.
  • The Associated Press (AP) also reported on Thursday that 40 out of 50 states were trending upwards in terms of daily new cases.
  • Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading disease expert in the US, said "we're going to be in some serious difficulty" if people didn't start following government advice, according to the AP.
  • A spike in coronavirus cases was observed in early June and was blamed on people celebrating Memorial Day Weekend, and officials are keen not to repeat the event.
  • Joshua Barocas, an infectious-disease expert at the Boston Medical Center, said earlier this week that the timing of the spike and the impending holiday "set up a perfect storm," according to The Guardian.

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Amazon delays Prime Day again to October - Business Insider

  • Amazon has pushed back its annual Prime Day shopping event again, to early October, amid growing concerns of a second wave of coronavirus-driven demand spike across its supply-chain network, according to emails sent to third-party sellers and people familiar with the matter.
  • In an email sent to sellers on Wednesday, Amazon said it was now expecting Prime Day to take place in early October.
  • This is the third time Amazon has delayed Prime Day this year, and it shows the uncertainty COVID-19 has brought to its logistics operations.
  • Having Prime Day in October, in fact, could help Amazon create more buzz and win a larger share of the holiday quarter spending, he said.
  • One seller, who received the email about Prime Day's delay but wanted to remain anonymous because he's not authorized to talk about it, said the change helps Amazon hone its internal operations and build out its employee testing facilities.

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Amazon delays Prime Day again to October - Business Insider

  • Amazon has pushed back its annual Prime Day shopping event again, to early October, amid growing concerns of a second wave of coronavirus-driven demand spike across its supply-chain network, according to emails sent to third-party sellers and people familiar with the matter.
  • In an email sent to sellers on Wednesday, Amazon said it was now expecting Prime Day to take place in early October.
  • This is the third time Amazon has delayed Prime Day this year, and it shows the uncertainty COVID-19 has brought to its logistics operations.
  • Having Prime Day in October, in fact, could help Amazon create more buzz and win a larger share of the holiday quarter spending, he said.
  • One seller, who received the email about Prime Day's delay but wanted to remain anonymous because he's not authorized to talk about it, said the change helps Amazon hone its internal operations and build out its employee testing facilities.

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How do Robots “find” themselves in an ever changing world?

  • It would be virtually impossible to navigate through all the content to find one image of a monkey wearing a red hat from a sequence of holiday snaps taken months or years ago.
  • In place of photos on a mobile phone, these robots must make sense of a continuous stream of video sequences (equivalent to millions of images) captured while in motion throughout their operational lifetime.
  • The good news, as shown in our work at 2019 ICCV, is that sequential reasoning outperforms bespoke deep learning-based approaches to solving the problem of scalable place recognition for robots.
  • Imagine this future scenario: autonomous cars that can work together to capture a real-time snapshot of what the world looks like at any given moment and how it changes from day to day.

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How do Robots “find” themselves in an ever changing world?

  • It would be virtually impossible to navigate through all the content to find one image of a monkey wearing a red hat from a sequence of holiday snaps taken months or years ago.
  • In place of photos on a mobile phone, these robots must make sense of a continuous stream of video sequences (equivalent to millions of images) captured while in motion throughout their operational lifetime.
  • The good news, as shown in our work at 2019 ICCV, is that sequential reasoning outperforms bespoke deep learning-based approaches to solving the problem of scalable place recognition for robots.
  • Imagine this future scenario: autonomous cars that can work together to capture a real-time snapshot of what the world looks like at any given moment and how it changes from day to day.

save | comments | report | share on


How do Robots “find” themselves in an ever changing world?

  • It would be virtually impossible to navigate through all the content to find one image of a monkey wearing a red hat from a sequence of holiday snaps taken months or years ago.
  • In place of photos on a mobile phone, these robots must make sense of a continuous stream of video sequences (equivalent to millions of images) captured while in motion throughout their operational lifetime.
  • The good news, as shown in our work at 2019 ICCV, is that sequential reasoning outperforms bespoke deep learning-based approaches to solving the problem of scalable place recognition for robots.
  • Imagine this future scenario: autonomous cars that can work together to capture a real-time snapshot of what the world looks like at any given moment and how it changes from day to day.

save | comments | report | share on