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Articles related to "internet"


A woman is suing Lyft alleging that she was kidnapped by a driver at gunpoint and raped by 2 other men but the company let him continue driving under another name

  • Lyft has been hit with yet another lawsuit claiming it allows sexual predators to roam on its platform.
  • Emails viewed by Vice also showed that Lyft promised to "unpair" her from the driver, and its explanation for the length of the trip was: "The driver might have forgot to end the ride." In a subsequent response a Lyft representative told Turkos that poor internet connection, an old phone, or faulty software could have been the cause.
  • Turkos filed the lawsuit against Lyft on Tuesday, claiming the firm is failing in its duty to keep sexual predators off the platform.
  • In the lawsuit Turkos also alleges that Lyft allowed her attacker to continue driving after the police began investigating her complaint, just under a different name.

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How users and applications stay safe on the Internet: it's proxy servers all the way down

  • Thanks to tracking cookies, browser fingerprinting, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) selling our browsing logs to advertisers, and our own inexplicable inclination to put our names and faces on social networks, online anonymity is out like last year’s LaCroix flavours.
  • This provides us with some anonymity, as the website we’re trying to reach will not see our originating IP address; however, the proxy server that we choose to use will know exactly who originated the request.
  • My preferred method, if we have a little time and a few monthly dollars to invest in our security, is to set up our own virtual instance with a company such as Amazon Web Services or Digital Ocean and use this as our proxy server.

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How users and applications stay safe on the Internet: it's proxy servers all the way down

  • Thanks to tracking cookies, browser fingerprinting, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) selling our browsing logs to advertisers, and our own inexplicable inclination to put our names and faces on social networks, online anonymity is out like last year’s LaCroix flavours.
  • This provides us with some anonymity, as the website we’re trying to reach will not see our originating IP address; however, the proxy server that we choose to use will know exactly who originated the request.
  • My preferred method, if we have a little time and a few monthly dollars to invest in our security, is to set up our own virtual instance with a company such as Amazon Web Services or Digital Ocean and use this as our proxy server.

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The US government isn’t ready to regulate the internet. Today’s Google fine shows why.

  • This will also sound familiar from this summer: YouTube says it is going to overhaul the way it interacts with kids who watch videos on its massive platform, but critics doubt the platform’s commitment to that pledge.
  • She wanted today’s deal to require YouTube to scour its platform for kids content — instead of simply making it ask video makers to comply with its rules.
  • But just like the Facebook settlement from earlier this summer, the gap between the YouTube settlement’s terms and the fundamental restructuring that YouTube’s critics want points out an even more fundamental question: Is the US government (or any government, really) up for the task of regulating giant internet platforms?

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Pushing Left, Like a Boss — Part 5.13 — HTTPS only

  • Now that encryption is fast, and free, and we know the risks of not using it, there is literally no excuse not to use HTTPS only for every application on the Internet.
  • Literally every application, even for static pages that contain no sensitive information.
  • For everyone (there is no class of user that does not need protection on the internet).
  • Every public website and web application (including APIs) should force the use of HTTPS (and disallow connections using HTTP).
  • This can be done using security headers in your code or forced on the server.
  • DEV is sort of like Medium, but it's open source and 100% focused on developers.
  • Now reaching over 3 million visitors per month, it's the fastest growing software development community in the world.
  • It's free, devoted to the open web, and will never have popups or a pay wall.

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Australia’s 4G network is faster than 5G

  • Australia is the only country with a 4G network that is faster than the 5G network, as shown in a new report.
  • Of the top eight countries with 5G services, the study found that Australia’s 5G speed was slightly slower than its maximum 4G speed.
  • According to the study by market analysis blog OpenSignal, the maximum speed experienced by 4G users in Australia was “so extremely fast… that the maximum 5G speed was actually slightly slower than the maximum 4G speed”.
  • When 5G is eventually adopted all over Australia, the new technology is expected to deliver dramatically reduced communication delays, making the much broader use of bold inventions such as surgical robots possible.
  • While the new technology has been welcomed by many, some are fearful of ‘smart cities’ trumping our right to privacy.

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Network Next goes global with tech to reduce lag in multiplayer online games

  • Network Next has developed a technology to reduce lag — or interaction delays that can ruin fast gameplay — for multiplayer online games, and now it is rolling it out around the world.
  • Game developers work with Network Next by specifying the performance they want for their game, then every ten seconds for each player, Network Next runs a bid in its marketplace to find the best route across supplier infrastructure between the game client and the datacenter where the game server is hosted.
  • That means game developers can now deliver the latency-reducing, performance-enhancing benefits of Network Next’s solution to their players, no matter where they’re located in the world.
  • Network Next finds an optimal route and adds a small price to it and charges that fee to the game developer.

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123-Reg and NamesCo registered millions of .uk domains without asking customers

  • But there was another problem: despite Nominet enjoying the huge additional revenues from .uk domains, and registrars being happy about selling millions more domains, lots of .co.uk domain holders didn’t actually want a .uk domain.
  • Nominet stands to make tens of millions of pounds from this scheme but as an organization that has gone to great pains to stress its “public benefit” mission, surely it will stand up for .uk domain holders and tell 123-Reg and NamesCo this practice is unacceptable and it must get their customer’s explicit consent before charging them for new names?
  • So 123-Reg and NamesCo customers are going to get screwed over twice: once for being forced to buy a domain they never said they wanted, and second, for paying a higher price that the registrars would charge otherwise.

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Free Open Source VPN – Curve25519,ChaCha20 – WireGuard and OpenVPN

  • With over a decade of experience developing and operating some of the most high security systems on earth OpenInternetAccess offers a wide array of solutions and services that will meet any of your need pertaining to open internet access and online privacy.
  • Choose the level of protection that works best for you with our easy to use solutions and services.
  • All of our services are totally free, with no strings attached!
  • This allows us to offer services to thousands of users at almost no cost.
  • We are able to break even without invading your privacy by simply advertising our other upsale offerings!
  • At OpenInternetAccess privacy isn't just a policy.
  • Privacy is the reason why we made OIA in the first place.
  • Unlike other free or even paid VPNs that require sign ups, collect your data, and track your identity - OpenInternetAccess collects and stores no logs of ANY kind.

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Microsoft President: Democracy Is At Stake. Regulate Big Tech

  • Microsoft President Brad Smith says governments need to set rules for big technology companies.
  • Microsoft President Brad Smith argues that governments need to put some "guardrails" around engineers and the tech titans they serve.
  • Today, the tech giants — whose tools have been used to interfere in fair and free elections — are posing a much bigger threat to the political stability of many countries, including the U.S. Smith has proposals that are not popular in Silicon Valley.
  • For one, he argues, it's time to reform the U.S. law that says Internet platforms are not liable for just about any of the content running through their pipes — hate speech, death threats and ads for counterfeit goods or illegal guns.
  • A tough law making Internet platforms accountable for content poses a greater threat to the competition than to Microsoft.

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