Sign Up Now!

Sign up and get personalized intelligence briefing delivered daily.


Sign Up

Articles related to "kim"


How North Korean hackers became the world’s greatest bank robbers

  • The Reconnaissance General Bureau, North Korea’s equivalent to the CIA, has trained up the world’s greatest bank-robbing crews.
  • In just the past few years, RGB hackers have struck more than 100 banks and cryptocurrency exchanges around the world, pilfering more than $650 million.
  • The bureau has trained up the world’s greatest bank-robbing crews, a constellation of hacking units that pull massive online heists.
  • In recent years, North Korea has launched hacks against more than 100 banks and online exchanges in a total of 30 countries.
  • To make sense of North Korea’s hacking feats, I sought out Kim Heung-Kwang, a bespectacled 58-year-old computer scientist living in Seoul.
  • And in the last three years alone, North Korean hackers have targeted banks and cryptocurrency exchanges in the following countries: South Korea, Thailand, India, the Philippines, Poland, Peru, Vietnam, Nigeria, Australia, Mexico, Japan and Singapore.

save | comments | report | share on


North Korean Pushback Undercuts U.S. Exuberance Over Kim Meeting

  • But U.S. hopes began to darken after North Korea issued statements this week withdrawing from a planned meeting with South Korean leaders and threatening to scrap the summit with Trump.
  • North Korean officials also lambasted National Security Adviser John Bolton, who had gone on television Sunday to praise the “Libya model” of arms control, under which the late dictator Moammar Qaddafi surrendered his nuclear program in exchange for an easing of economic sanctions.
  • In a bid to keep plans for the summit on track, Trump on Thursday contradicted Bolton, saying his administration isn’t using Libya as a example for North Korea “at all” and that the U.S. would probably need to provide assurances to the regime to get a grand bargain.

save | comments | report | share on


Is Xi Jinping the puppetmaster behind North Korea's pushback on talks?

  • China has mixed feelings about a closer relationship between North Korea and the United States, experts say, and wants any agreement struck between Pyongyang and Washington to ensure Beijing is still the powerbroker in the region.
  • But there's no doubt a rising China still wants to see a successful summit in Singapore in June, which could lead to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and peace in the region.
  • On Thursday, Xi met with a North Korean delegation of senior officials, saying he supported denuclearization of the peninsula as well as warmer relations between Pyongyang and Washington.
  • Richard McGregor, senior fellow at Sydney's Lowy Institute, told CNN the perfect outcome of the summit for China would be cordial talks, leading eventually to a peace treaty and calmer Korean Peninsula.
  • Trump's suggestion that Beijing may have been to blame for North Korea's recent wavering could have unintended consequences for US China relations, McGregor said.

save | comments | report | share on


Trump really wants the (North Korean) show to go on

  • Trump's message to Kim appeared to play into that goal and to be saying: If you give up your nuclear weapons, we will in return offer guarantees of North Korean security and allow you to stay in power.
  • The President did not give details about the protections he was prepared to offer Kim. But in the past, Bolton and Trump's new secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, have appeared to advocate regime change in North Korea -- a position the President appears to be renouncing.
  • Some American observers saw North Korea's threats earlier this week as a return to the cycle of offering dialogue and then demanding concessions, which doomed more than 20 years of US attempts to solve the nuclear showdown with the isolated state.

save | comments | report | share on


Giuliani Says Mueller Willing to Limit Scope of Trump Interview

  • President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani said Special Counsel Robert Mueller has indicated he is willing to narrow the scope of an interview with Trump from questions presented to Trump’s legal team in March.
  • Giuliani said he is aiming to wrap up negotiations over an interview before June 12, when Trump is planning to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore.
  • The actual interview would take place some time afterward.
  • Mueller’s team offered no assurances that the investigation would end shortly after a presidential interview, one of Giuliani’s demands.
  • But Giuliani said he thinks that is the next step in negotiations.

save | comments | report | share on


Opinion: Ghitis: North Korea is testing Trump

  • The meeting is not canceled, but the North Koreans shocked Washington and Seoul when they announced at the last moment that talks with South Korea, scheduled for Wednesday, were "indefinitely" postponed because of long-planned military exercises between the United States and South Korea.
  • Hours later, North Korea went much further, saying it may cancel the summit altogether over US demands that it abandon its nuclear weapons.
  • The annual exercises are aimed at maintaining military coordination between the United States and its ally, to remain ready in case of a North Korean attack.
  • Giving in to Kim on the exercises would constitute another concession in what are already lopsided pre-summit negotiations.
  • So far, Kim's main concession is a promise to dismantle a nuclear testing site, but many experts say the site is damaged from previous explosions and has already served its purpose, helping complete North Korea's nuclear arsenal.

save | comments | report | share on


Trump, still planning summit, reassures and warns Kim Jong Un

  • Trump also reassured Kim Jong Un the North Korean leader would remain in power if he abandons his nuclear weapons program, but warned Kim that North Korea could be "decimated" if he refuses to strike a deal with the United States.
  • The President did seek to distance himself from a comment by his national security adviser, John Bolton, that had irked the North Koreans, dismissing talk of applying the "Libyan model" to the denuclearization of North Korea and reassuring Kim he will remain in power if he gives up his nuclear weapons.
  • But the President also appeared to be confused about the "Libyan model" Bolton referred to late last month, when his national security adviser said the "Libya model of 2003, 2004" could be applied to US negotiations with North Korea.
  • Drawing on those comments, Trump also warned Kim of the alternative to striking a denuclearization deal: the decimation of North Korea and Kim's removal from power.

save | comments | report | share on


Trump says he would protect Kim Jong Un if North Korea agreed to get rid of nukes

  • President Donald Trump on Thursday said North Korea's Kim Jong Un will "get protections that would be very strong" if he agreed to get rid of his country's nukes.
  • With these remarks, Trump was seemingly attempting to calm Kim and push back on the notion the US would take a Libya-style approach to North Korea.
  • In late April, White House national security adviser John Bolton said the Trump administration was "looking at the Libya model of 2003, 2004" in terms of North Korea and denuclearization.
  • This reportedly made officials in Pyongyang uncomfortable given the violent death of Libya's infamous leader, Muammar Gaddafi, in 2011.
  • Gaddafi in 2003 allowed international inspectors to visit Libya to ensure its nuclear and chemical weapons programs had ceased.
  • But after a popular uprising began in Libya in 2011, which the US and its allies supported, Gaddafi was brutally killed by rebels.

save | comments | report | share on


The US reportedly called Kim Jong Un's bluff by demanding its nukes — and North Korea is flipping out

  • They objected to the US demanding the complete denuclearization of North Korea, about unsavory comments made by Trump officials, and about US and South Korean military drills.
  • In past months, Kim reportedly said he "understands" why the drills are going on, and went forward with peace talks without asking for them to be toned down.
  • Asahi's report follows Bolton suggesting North Korean nukes go to a nuclear facility in Oakridge, Tennessee and South Korean media reporting that Pompeo asked Kim to send five nuclear devices to France to be dismantled.
  • Pyongyang did not object to these consistent demands until Tuesday, when the historic summit between Kim and Trump was less than a month away.
  • Experts who spoke to Business Insider consistently point to the real possibility that Kim does not want to part with his nuclear arsenal, and is merely playing the US by going along with its demands while improving relations with major trading partners.

save | comments | report | share on


The US reportedly called Kim Jong Un's bluff by demanding its nukes — and North Korea is flipping out

  • They objected to the US demanding the complete denuclearization of North Korea, about unsavory comments made by Trump officials, and about US and South Korean military drills.
  • In past months, Kim reportedly said he "understands" why the drills are going on, and went forward with peace talks without asking for them to be toned down.
  • Asahi's report follows Bolton suggesting North Korean nukes go to a nuclear facility in Oakridge, Tennessee and South Korean media reporting that Pompeo asked Kim to send five nuclear devices to France to be dismantled.
  • Pyongyang did not object to these consistent demands until Tuesday, when the historic summit between Kim and Trump was less than a month away.
  • Experts who spoke to Business Insider consistently point to the real possibility that Kim does not want to part with his nuclear arsenal, and is merely playing the US by going along with its demands while improving relations with major trading partners.

save | comments | report | share on