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Articles related to "law"


Trump tweets Antifa will be labeled a terrorist organization but experts believe that's unconstitutional

  • The President's call for a terrorist designation comes as Trump and Attorney General Bill Barr have pointed to far-left groups as responsible for many of the violent protests across the country.
  • An announcement by the Justice Department on Sunday to use Joint Terrorism Task Forces around the country to investigate some of the violence in major cities singles out leftist Antifa activity, though US law enforcement officials say there are groups from both the extremist left and right involved in the riots and attacks on police.
  • Trump's and Barr's focus on left-leaning groups also stands in contrast with repeated warnings in recent years from US law enforcement that the rise of white supremacist groups has become the biggest domestic terrorism challenge.
  • Christopher Wray, the FBI director, has raised concerns about the increase of white supremacist activity driving the domestic terror threat -- in some cases surpassing that from foreign terrorist groups.

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Evictions loom as state freezes on rent payments expire

  • Colleen Foley, the executive director of Legal Aid Milwaukee, said that her group has seen a dramatic increase in calls for assistance, from a total of 300 calls between March 31 and mid-May to "about 200 calls a day" -- even though Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers has announced a $25 million rental assistance program.
  • House Democrats included $100 billion in relief for renters in a $3 trillion aid package passed earlier this month, but Republicans have said the sweeping legislation won't be considered by the GOP-controlled Senate.
  • Iowa Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds on Tuesday announced the creation of a rental assistance fund as her state's eviction restrictions lifted using money the federal government has made available to states through the $2 trillion congressional aid package passed in March.
  • The New York state legislature passed an emergency relief act on Thursday creating $100 million rental assistance fund to help tenants pay back rent from April 1 to July 1.

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Grimes has revealed the nickname she uses for baby 'X Æ A-12' - Insider

  • Claire "c" Boucher, AKA Grimes, told Bloomberg in a recent profile about her art and music that she has a much simpler nickname for her and Elon Musk's baby boy X Æ A-12.
  • Musk tweeted out seemingly random characters claiming it was his new baby boy's name, spurring many memes.
  • Some joked that the name might be pronounced "Kyle," until Grimes clarified that you speak it as the singular letters X, A, and I sound.
  • However, Musk later told Joe Rogan the Æ part is pronounced "Ash," so it's all still a bit unclear.
  • Grimes and Musk slightly adjusted the name from X Æ A-Xii to X Æ A-12 because of questions around its validity under California law.
  • Only the 26 letters of the English alphabet and certain punctuation can be included on a birth certificate, the law states.

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Hong Kong tensions a risk to global economy, says Japan

  • China's state media and the government of Hong Kong lashed out at US President Donald Trump's vow to end Hong Kong's special status if Beijing imposes new national security laws on the city, which is bracing for fresh protests.
  • Hong Kong's government said the threatened actions were "unjustified" and that China was within its "legitimate rights" to pursue the national security laws that Beijing says will help quell months of unrest.
  • The coronavirus pandemic had, until recently, kept protesters at home; larger demonstrations have returned in the past week as people fought controversial legislation to criminalise disrespect toward China's national anthem and Beijing's efforts to impose the new security law on the territory, which has had relative autonomy since being returned to China by Britain in 1997.

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Customs and Border Protection drone flew over Minneapolis to provide live video to law enforcement

  • The agency deployed the unmanned aircraft to help provide "situational awareness" for federal law enforcement partners in Minneapolis, according to the spokesperson.
  • Sometime after the drone arrived in Minneapolis airspace, CBP was told it was no longer needed, according to the spokesperson.
  • The drone flight came in the wake of protests Thursday night in Minneapolis and some other cities around the country.
  • The CBP spokesperson said the agency's Air and Marine Operations division "routinely" provides support to local law enforcement when requested, as well as support for humanitarian relief efforts.
  • During the 2015 Freddie Gray protests in Baltimore, the FBI used a manned surveillance plane to fly over the city, said Laperruque.
  • CBP, which is overseen by the Department of Homeland Security, has a policy that permits local, tribal, state or federal agencies to request aerial support, according to a department official.

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If Section 230 dies, Twitter and Facebook would likely ban Trump - Business Insider

  • Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, the part of the law that Trump wants to change, is what's been protecting him and his social media posts.
  • If Section 230 is removed, then social media sites like Twitter and Facebook could be held accountable for the truth and accuracy of the content on their site, particularly if someone has a plausible claim that such statements have damaged them.
  • So, if he were to get his latest wish and delete Section 230, he would be removing the protections that allowed him to post whatever he wanted.
  • Trump would either have to stop posting untrue things on social media, or Twitter and Facebook would face such a high liability they would be forced to remove more of his posts, or even ban him altogether.

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If Section 230 dies, Twitter and Facebook would likely ban Trump - Business Insider

  • Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, the part of the law that Trump wants to change, is what's been protecting him and his social media posts.
  • If Section 230 is removed, then social media sites like Twitter and Facebook could be held accountable for the truth and accuracy of the content on their site, particularly if someone has a plausible claim that such statements have damaged them.
  • So, if he were to get his latest wish and delete Section 230, he would be removing the protections that allowed him to post whatever he wanted.
  • Trump would either have to stop posting untrue things on social media, or Twitter and Facebook would face such a high liability they would be forced to remove more of his posts, or even ban him altogether.

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The Senate voted to let the government keep surveilling your online life without a warrant

  • Many senators wanted to forbid the government from secretly collecting information about your internet habits, but an amendment failed by just one vote.
  • In the middle of this — and with this shift in mind — the Senate voted on Wednesday not to protect Americans’ internet browsing and search history data from secret and warrantless surveillance by law enforcement.
  • The vote was for an amendment to the controversial Patriot Act, which would have expressly forbidden internet browsing and history from what the government is allowed to collect through the approval of a secret court.
  • McConnell’s amendment would have deliberately included internet search history and web browsing data in a list of records that the government can request through FISA courts.

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In NY major crime complaints fell when cops stopped ‘proactive policing’ (2017)

  • When New York police officers temporarily reduced their “proactive policing” efforts on low-level offenses, major-crime reports in the city actually fell, according to a study based on New York Police Department crime statistics.
  • These reports describe the weekly activity for each NYPD precinct, including: “Criminal summonses” for penal law violations such as public alcohol consumption and disorderly conduct; “Stop, question and frisks” or SQFs; “Non-major crime arrests,” the vast majority of which are misdemeanors; and “Major crime complaints,” such as murder, rape, robbery and felony assault.
  • During the slowdown, the researchers found that police dramatically reduced the number of criminal summonses and SQFs — a confirmation that, indeed, the low-level proactive policing activities had gone down.
  • And this slight suppression of major crime rates actually continued for seven to 14 weeks after those drops in proactive policing — which led the researchers to estimate that overall, the slowdown resulted in about 2,100 fewer major-crimes complaints.

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The world’s scariest facial recognition company, explained

  • This scenario appears to be possible thanks to a shady startup called Clearview AI which, as a New York Times investigation earlier this year revealed, has been mining your pictures online to build a vast facial recognition database.
  • Reporting from BuzzFeed News showed that the company had a client list that went far beyond law enforcement and included the NBA, Best Buy, and Macy’s, though some of these companies distanced themselves from the facial recognition startup.
  • Clearview argues that the tech can help track down dangerous people, and its site points to “child molesters, murderers, suspected terrorists.” And as the Times reported in February, the company’s facial recognition has helped identify child victims in exploitative videos posted to the web.
  • The Times reports that the technology will work with images of faces from many different angles, while older facial recognition tools used by police departments might require the subject to be looking straight ahead, like in a mug shot.

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