Sign Up Now!

Sign up and get personalized intelligence briefing delivered daily.


Sign Up

Articles related to "legal"


Dutch order 10k mink culled because of COVID-19, but deaths postponed - Business Insider

  • Authorities in the Netherlands ordered the mass slaughter of 10,000 mink for fear that the animals could harbor the coronavirus, and spark a new wave of human infections.
  • The order was made after scientists there confirmed that the animals — a source of high-end fur products — could infect humans with COVID-19.
  • The suspected COVID-19 transfer from mink to humans on farms in the south of the Netherlands was first reported by the Dutch government on May 19.
  • The transmission initially came from human farm workers and infected the mink, according to Arjan Stegeman, a veterinary epidemiologist at Utrecht University cited by Bloomberg who is investigating the outbreak.
  • These infected mink were then able to pass it back to humans, the Dutch government confirmed in a letter sent to the Netherlands parliament in The Hague, on May 25.

save | comments | report | share on


Dutch order 10k mink culled because of COVID-19, but deaths postponed - Business Insider

  • Authorities in the Netherlands ordered the mass slaughter of 10,000 mink for fear that the animals could harbor the coronavirus, and spark a new wave of human infections.
  • The order was made after scientists there confirmed that the animals — a source of high-end fur products — could infect humans with COVID-19.
  • The suspected COVID-19 transfer from mink to humans on farms in the south of the Netherlands was first reported by the Dutch government on May 19.
  • The transmission initially came from human farm workers and infected the mink, according to Arjan Stegeman, a veterinary epidemiologist at Utrecht University cited by Bloomberg who is investigating the outbreak.
  • These infected mink were then able to pass it back to humans, the Dutch government confirmed in a letter sent to the Netherlands parliament in The Hague, on May 25.

save | comments | report | share on


Instagram says sites need photographers’ permission to embed posts

  • A different judge previously determined that Instagram could sublicense photographs to sites that embed its posts, protecting the site Mashable from a lawsuit.
  • The recent ruling doesn’t disagree with this conclusion, but Judge Katherine Failla said there wasn’t evidence Instagram did grant such a sublicense.
  • Instagram told Ars Technica it was “exploring” more ways for users to control embedding.
  • Neither judge ruled on what’s called the “server test” — an argument that embedded photos aren’t copying photos in a way that could infringe on copyright because they’re simply pointing to content posted on another site (in this case, Instagram).
  • Newsweek still has defenses if the server test fails, including invoking fair use law, so embedding an Instagram post isn’t categorically forbidden.
  • By removing a blanket legal protection, though, that would raise the legal stakes for embedding an Instagram post — and depending on other sites’ policies, make embedding content from any social media platform riskier.

save | comments | report | share on


The big bankers going the pro-bono route

  • When Tony Osmond, the head of banking, capital markets and advisory at Citi Australia, asked the head office if he could donate his services to charity, the bank's New York compliance staff were a little flummoxed.
  • In this case, Osmond wanted approval to join the panel of bankers and lawyers who donate their services to Adara Partners, which channels the money into helping poverty-stricken people in Africa and Asia.
  • Osmond says that after the Citi head office gave him the approval to join the Adara panel, there was a discussion about whether the model could be adopted in London and New York.
  • Osmond says each Adara mandate has to be cleared for possible conflicts of interest at each bank or law firm but once that occurs, rival bankers and lawyers can work alongside each other in the common interests of a client.

save | comments | report | share on


Apple crushes one-man repair shop in Norway’s Supreme Court

  • With this decision, Apple continues to effectively shut off access to refurbished or after market spare parts for independent repairers.
  • While the Oslo District Court ruled in 2018 that Huseby did not violate Apple’s trademark, because Huseby never claimed to be using unused original spare parts, the Court of Appeal ruled in 2019 that the imported screens are illegal copies.
  • Apple’s aggressive use of copyright in order to shut down independent repairs will ultimately raise prices for consumers, if they are forced to choose Apple’s far more expensive authorised repairers who have access to new, genuine parts.
  • We are now holding the European Commission to its commitment to “a Right to Repair” in the Circular Economy Action Plan, to ensure universal access to affordable genuine spare parts for all electronics for both repair professionals and consumers.

save | comments | report | share on


Colin Kaepernick starts legal defense fund for protesters arrested in Minneapolis

  • Kaepernick, along with his nonprofit Know Your Rights Camp, has started a Legal Defense Initiative to support protesters in Minneapolis who may need legal resources.
  • The initiative would provide those in need with "top defense lawyers" in the Minneapolis area, the website states.
  • Kaepernick has been involved in protests against systemic racial injustice for years, most famously when he would kneel before NFL games while the National Anthem would play to protest police brutality.
  • However, Kaepernick has been without a football team since 2017, when he became a free agent.
  • No team has offered him a contract, which many have argued is due to his protests.
  • Kaepernick filed a grievance against the NFL accusing team owners of colluding to keep him from being signed.
  • The NFL denied any collusion and in 2019, they reached a settlement with Kaepernick and former teammate Eric Reid, who knelt with him.

save | comments | report | share on


Justice for George Floyd gets a step closer

  • Third-degree murder carries a maximum penalty of 25 years and requires proof that the defendant committed an act "eminently dangerous to others and evincing a depraved mind, without regard for human life." In other words, a third-degree charge requires prosecutors to show that Chauvin acted recklessly and dangerously, without necessarily intending to kill Floyd.
  • Ellison took over the case shortly thereafter, reportedly at "the urging of Floyd's family, community activists, and some members of the Minneapolis City Council," and now he has addressed a shortcoming in the original complaint by charging Chauvin with a more serious second-degree murder count, which carries a potential 40-year sentence.
  • Even if the jury does not convict on the top charge (the second-degree murder), it still can find Chauvin guilty on one or both of these lesser charges.
  • The other three officers now face charges of accomplice liability for aiding and abetting Chauvin in committing second-degree murder and manslaughter.

save | comments | report | share on


Tech group files first lawsuit challenging Trump's social media executive order

  • Washington (CNN) - A nonprofit advocacy group partially funded by Big Tech has filed a lawsuit challenging President Donald Trump's executive order on social media, marking Silicon Valley's first major legal effort to resist the plan.
  • It was filed in Washington, DC, federal court Tuesday.
  • CDT, which receives funding from major tech companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter, said in a statement that the move is aimed at protecting tech platforms that are trying to provide accurate information about how to vote.
  • Legal experts have warned that Trump's order is on shaky legal ground.
  • The order calls for the Federal Communications Commission to reinterpret key provisions of the Communications Decency Act of 1996.
  • Trump and his allies have long accused social media platforms of censoring conservative viewpoints, while tech companies have long disputed that claim.

save | comments | report | share on


California’s statehouse is considering a controversial facial recognition bill

  • As protestors square off against police across the country, California is readying a bill that could expand the state’s use of facial recognition, including for law enforcement purposes.
  • For supporters, it’s an important privacy measure, heading off the more extreme uses of widely available technology.
  • Ed Chau, the assemblyman who introduced the bill, called it “the long overdue solution to regulate the use of facial recognition technology by commercial, state and local public entities,” in an editorial for CalMatters on Tuesday.
  • But critics — including the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California — say the bill will only expand the use of the technology further.
  • In particular, they allege that providing legal conditions under which the technology can be used undercuts outright bans that have been put in place by a number of California municipalities, including San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley.
  • Police use of facial recognition has been widely criticized by activists and researchers.

save | comments | report | share on


Trump’s executive order on social media is legally unenforceable, experts say

  • Despite President Donald Trump’s threats that Republicans might shut down social media companies in retaliation for fact-checking his tweets, the executive order he signed on Thursday unsurprisingly doesn’t come anywhere close.
  • Trump’s new order aims to limit social media companies’ legal protections if they don’t adhere to unspecified standards of neutrality.
  • The order calls for limiting protections that a law called Section 230 offers tech companies like Twitter, Facebook, and Google by not holding them responsible for what users post on their platforms.
  • Trump can, however, try to get legislation passed that would selectively cull tech companies’ legal protections unless they follow certain standards of neutrality, and his executive order tasks the attorney general to draft a proposal for such a law.

save | comments | report | share on