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Articles related to "military"


The kid next door: Neighborhood friendships on a comeback amid the pandemic

  • But in the not-too-distant past, children's friendships were formed and maintained within the American neighborhood.
  • In new, yet-to-be-published research, my colleagues and I found children living on military installations were more likely to form their friendships within their neighborhoods than their civilian peers, with 37% of military-affiliated children forming their friendships in this setting as opposed to only 25% of civilian children.
  • We observed the physical characteristics of their neighborhoods often include cul-de-sacs, swimming pools and recreation centers that promoted children's interaction and also allow parents to feel a greater sense of community and safety.
  • Parents can support a shift to neighborhood friendships by helping their children understand how to stay physically distant while socially and emotionally engaged.
  • Parents may form networks of social relationships with neighbors to help foster their children's relationships and provide a safety net of monitoring.

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US military coronavirus cases more than doubled in the last 3 weeks

  • Washington (CNN) - The number of active-duty military personnel infected with the novel coronavirus has more than doubled in the last three weeks, according to new figures published by the Defense Department.
  • Defense officials say the "uptick" in cases at military installations has happened "largely around where we are seeing it in the civilian communities, so in Florida, in Texas, in Arizona, some parts of California," according to Thomas McCaffrey, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs.
  • The Pentagon is looking at data to see if the uptick at those installations might be attributable to interactions between members of the military and communities where there have been large increases in cases.
  • At the Air Force Global Strike Command headquarters in Barksdale, Louisiana -- which oversees the long-range bomber fleet -- Gen. Timothy Ray ordered all military and civilian personnel to wear masks in any public spaces where social distancing is not possible.

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Trump says he'll veto must-pass defense spending bill if it requires bases honoring Confederate generals to be renamed

  • However, Trump -- using an offensive nickname for Warren -- has now made the bill the latest flashpoint in his defense of monuments to the Confederacy and other racist leaders from the country's past as he attempts to distract from a new nationwide peak in coronavirus cases and his own plummeting poll numbers.
  • Warren's amendment to the legislation calls for removing the names of Confederate leaders from all military assets -- base, installation, facility, aircraft, ship, plane or other type of equipment -- within three years.
  • While Trump has often said in his statements about the bases that he opposes renaming places where troops were trained during the First and Second World Wars, the push falls in line with his desire to see statues to Confederate leaders continue to stand despite popular sentiment shifting in the opposite direction.

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Opinion: There is a difference between statues of Abraham Lincoln and Confederate generals

  • But as the nation confronts the ugliest aspects of its history, we need to recognize that there is a fundamental difference between statues of American presidents like Abraham Lincoln and statues of American traitors like Confederate President Jefferson Davis.
  • But in Boston, Mayor Marty Walsh announced support for taking down a statue of Lincoln — the original of which was paid for by money raised by freed slaves and dedicated by Frederick Douglass in Washington, DC.
  • We are all imperfect people struggling to form a more perfect union but surely we can agree that there is a difference between statues of Jefferson Davis and Thomas Jefferson — let alone Abraham Lincoln and Confederate generals — in our civic spaces.

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China moves forward with COVID-19 vaccine, approving it for use in military

  • China has approved an experimental COVID-19 vaccine for use in its military after early clinical trial data suggested it was safe and spurred immune responses—but before larger trials that will test whether the vaccine can protect against SARS-CoV-2 infections.
  • In a Phase 1 safety trial involving 108 people, the vaccine—dubbed Ad5-nCoV—proved safe and was able to spur the production of neutralizing antibodies and other immune responses.
  • However, the study, published in The Lancet, also detected a potential foil for the vaccine candidate: In people who had been infected with Ad5 in their past, the vaccine didn’t generate as strong of a response to SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein.
  • Further ReadingThe Ars COVID-19 vaccine primer: 100-plus in the works, 8 in clinical trialsCanSino said it had since completed a larger Phase 2 trial, looking at safety and efficacy, but has yet to release results, according to the South China Morning Post.

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China approves experimental Covid-19 vaccine for military use

  • Hong Kong (CNN) - The Chinese government has approved the use of an experimental Covid-19 vaccine for the country's military -- the latest step in a global race to stop the deadly disease caused by the novel coronavirus.
  • In a statement to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Monday, CanSino announced that China's Central Military Commission had given the vaccine a "military specially-needed drug approval" on June 25.
  • According to a CanSino statement, clinical trials of the new vaccine have shown a "good safety profile" with initial results indicating that Ad5-nCoV had potential to prevent diseases caused by SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus strain that causes Covid-19.
  • Speaking to Chinese state-run tabloid Global Times, Li Daguang, a professor at the National Defense University of the People's Liberation Army, said the authorities had followed "normal procedures" to approve the drug for military use and that its special status would change future development or marketing.

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New missiles for defence in $270b arms build-up

  • Australia will be armed with long-range missiles for the first time as part of a $270 billion build-up of the Defence Force over the next decade as the Morrison government looks to keep up with the regional arms race being fuelled by China's militarisation.
  • The update creates three new strategic objectives for the ADF: shaping the environment by working with like-minded nations to ensure regional peace and prosperity; possessing sufficient strength to deter adversaries; and having a credible military force to respond if attacked.
  • While Mr Morrison will say Australia remains prepared to make contributions outside the immediate region, including to US-led coalitions, his comments represent a significant shift from Australia's involvement in Afghanistan and the Middle East over the past two decades which has dominated decisions over the force structure.
  • Australia will acquire long-range missiles for the first time amid a backdrop of increasing militarisation in the region, as Prime Minister Scott Morrison signals a more aggressive posture to deter potential adversaries.

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Iran issues arrest warrant on Trump for killing of Qassem Soleimani - Business Insider

  • Iran has issued an arrest warrant on Donald Trump for the killing of General Qassem Soleimani and asked Interpol for help detain him.
  • Tehran called for an Interpol red notice on 36 US political and military figures, including the president, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported on Monday.
  • Iranian prosecutor Qasi Mehr said the figures had been charged with "murder and terrorist acts" for the killing of Soleimani by US drone strike in Baghdad in January.
  • Red notices are issued to law enforcement agencies around the world requesting that the individual is located and arrested but they do not compel them to do so.
  • It is unlikely that Interpol will accept Iran's request for a red notice given that it is required under its own regulations to reject any request that it judges to be politically motivated.

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Iran issues arrest warrant on Trump for killing of Qassem Soleimani - Business Insider

  • Iran has issued an arrest warrant on Donald Trump for the killing of General Qassem Soleimani and asked Interpol for help detain him.
  • Tehran called for an Interpol red notice on 36 US political and military figures, including the president, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported on Monday.
  • Iranian prosecutor Qasi Mehr said the figures had been charged with "murder and terrorist acts" for the killing of Soleimani by US drone strike in Baghdad in January.
  • Red notices are issued to law enforcement agencies around the world requesting that the individual is located and arrested but they do not compel them to do so.
  • It is unlikely that Interpol will accept Iran's request for a red notice given that it is required under its own regulations to reject any request that it judges to be politically motivated.

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Debate over renaming Fort Bragg looms over Senate race and other down ballot contest

  • With efforts to rededicate military bases named for Confederate officers gaining unprecedented traction from military leaders and federal lawmakers, a proposal to rename them within three years is set to be debated by the Senate this week as part of the National Defense Authorization Act. Although President Donald Trump has threatened to veto any bill that would include such a measure, the idea has won support from some Republicans.
  • Following the 2015 mass shooting in Charleston, when a White supremacist gunman killed nine Black worshippers, the Army quickly dismissed the idea of renaming any of its bases honoring Confederate officers, reasoning that the "names represent individuals, not causes or ideologies." Three years ago, when White supremacists demonstrated in Charlottesville, military officials again rejected a change using the same rationale.

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