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Articles related to "news"


Harvey Weinstein's trial is closely tracking Bill Cosby's. But there's 1 major difference

  • That scene neatly sums up Bill Cosby's criminal case, and -- as we learned over the past week -- closely mirrors Harvey Weinstein's ongoing rape and sexual assault trial in New York.
  • Weinstein's and Cosby's cases bear deep resemblances: dated accusations without supporting forensic evidence, an aggressive defense cross-examination strategy, even testimony from the same expert state witness.
  • Cosby's defense team also challenged the testimony of five "prior bad acts" witnesses who testified that Cosby had drugged and assaulted them years earlier.
  • Both Cosby's and Weinstein's trials also feature several "prior bad acts" witnesses whose testimony is not related directly to any criminal charges.
  • In general, "prior bad acts" witnesses aim to strengthen the prosecution's case, particularly in a "he said-she said" sexual assault trial with limited physical evidence.

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Democratic candidates back plan to change how military investigates sexual assault allegations

  • Washington (CNN) - Several Democratic presidential hopefuls have signed on to a plan that would overhaul the military's handling of sexual assault allegations.
  • As recently as last year, the secretaries of each service branch voiced opposition to taking military sexual assault cases out of the chain of command.
  • And Arizona Republican Sen. Martha McSally, who revealed last year that she was raped while serving in the US Air Force, advocated to keep sexual assault within the chain of command in a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing in March.
  • Other military sexual assault survivors like former Air Force SSgt. Harmony Allen and former Navy helicopter pilot Lt. Paula Coughlin -- the faces of the Protect our Defenders campaign -- disagree.
  • They told CNN that more soldiers would report if given the protection of an outside prosecutor because of circumstances unique to the military: like being stationed with the accused and even sharing a commander.

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A man bought a Rolex for $345 in 1974. Its current value knocked him off his feet

  • The man appeared on the PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" with his unworn Rolex Oyster Cosmograph Reference No. 6263 in hopes of learning its value.
  • The man, a US Air Force veteran, said he purchased the Rolex because he heard it was a good brand for scuba diving.
  • Instead, he kept the watch in a safety deposit box for nearly 40 years, only taking it out a few times to check on it.
  • Not only was the watch in perfect condition, but the veteran had saved the warranty papers, original Rolex brochure for the Cosmograph, two receipts, and the two original boxes the Rolex came in.
  • The watch is extremely, extremely rare, according to Planes, who valued the Rolex at a price between $500,000 to $700,000 since it was unworn and included all its documentation.

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20 times Trump has criticized Fox News

  • President Donald Trump values loyalty.
  • Fox News, Trump's favorite news channel, was part of what propelled him to victory in 2016.
  • His frequent appearances won over the hosts of "Fox & Friends" in the mornings and the opinion programs during primetime.
  • But when Trump was scrutinized for pressuring a foreign government to investigate his rival, and was later impeached, the president didn't receive blind loyalty from his preferred network.
  • While Fox News' opinion hosts mostly stand behind Trump, its news division and its polls are independent.
  • Throughout 2019, particularly once the impeachment inquiry heated up, Trump regularly let the news channel know, usually through Twitter, when he didn't like what an anchor said, who a particular guest was, or what their polling concluded.
  • Here are all the times the president has criticized Fox News.

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How AI is battling the coronavirus outbreak

  • These new AI capabilities are on full display with the recent coronavirus outbreak, which was identified early by a Canadian firm called BlueDot, which is one of a number of companies that use data to evaluate public health risks.
  • The company, which says it conducts “automated infectious disease surveillance,” notified its customers about the new form of coronavirus at the end of December, days before both the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) sent out official notices, as reported by Wired.
  • The idea behind BlueDot’s model (whose final results are subsequently analyzed by human researchers) is to get information to health care workers as quickly as possible, with the hope that they can diagnose — and, if needed, isolate — infected and potentially contagious people early on.
  • Metabiota, like BlueDot, uses natural-language processing to evaluate online reports about a potential disease, and it’s also working on developing the same technology for social media data.

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World Health Organization to send delegation to China to help combat coronavirus outbreak

  • The World Health Organization is sending a delegation of researchers and other health experts to China to help combat the coronavirus outbreak.
  • The two were joined by top officials from the WHO and the Chinese government to discuss how best to contain a fast-spreading and deadly virus in Wuhan and other cities and provinces.
  • The WHO said its delegation will collaborate with Chinese counterparts "on increasing understanding of the outbreak to guide global response efforts." A spokesperson declined to further comment on the delegation, including who will be included in the group.
  • The virus has now killed 106 people in China and infected roughly 4,700 across the world as of Tuesday, according to Chinese and U.S. health authorities.
  • According to the WHO, more data needs to be collected before the virus is declared a global health emergency.

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Coronavirus, repo market and the reserve rate: What to watch this week from the Fed

  • Practically no one expects the central bank to move its benchmark borrowing rate until at least September.
  • While the operation ostensibly was aimed at keeping overnight borrowing rates within their proscribed range, it also has coincided with a stock market rally that has almost perfectly matched the balance sheet increase.
  • Instead, the committee might be tempted to increase the interest it pays on excess reserves that banks store at the Fed. The rate is currently set at 1.55%, but could be line for a nudge up to 1.6%.
  • But since the repo operations began, the funds rate has slipped to the low end of its 1.5%-1.75% range — currently at 1.55%, same as the IOER.
  • Futures traders are further indicating a 58% chance of a quarter-point decrease in the funds rate by September, rising to 73% by the end of the year.

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AI can help warn about coronavirus and other potential epidemics

  • These new AI capabilities are on full display with the recent coronavirus outbreak, which was identified early by a Canadian firm called BlueDot, which is one of a number of companies that use data to evaluate public health risks.
  • The company, which says it conducts “automated infectious disease surveillance,” notified its customers about the new form of coronavirus at the end of December, days before both the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) sent out official notices, as reported by Wired.
  • The idea behind BlueDot’s model (whose final results are subsequently analyzed by human researchers) is to get information to health care workers as quickly as possible, with the hope that they can diagnose — and, if needed, isolate — infected and potentially contagious people early on.
  • Metabiota, like BlueDot, uses natural-language processing to evaluate online reports about a potential disease, and it’s also working on developing the same technology for social media data.

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To contain disease outbreaks, health officials rely on people’s trust

  • As the coronavirus outbreak continues to spread, the Chinese government and health officials around the world are counting on an intangible factor to help them contain the virus: trust.
  • “In West Africa, during the Ebola crisis, people distrusted government not because they were uninformed, but because in the past, the government had done things that weren’t trustworthy,” he says.
  • Many people living in China have good reasons to feel the same way: during the SARS outbreak in 2002 and 2003, the Chinese government mislead public health officials and attempted to conceal the extent of the problem.
  • While the World Health Organization has said that Chinese officials are being more transparent during this outbreak, people living through it are less confident that their government is telling them the whole story.
  • Blair says that there may also be less compliance with public health practices in China if trust is that low, just as there was in Liberia.

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A line of Atari-branded gaming hotels are on their way to US cities

  • In this week’s unexpected-but-completely welcome bizarre news, Atari — yes, that Atari, children of the 80s — is putting its name on a line of gaming-themed hotels.
  • Atari is working with the GSD Group to build the hotels in eight major cities.
  • GSD will be doing the work of actually building the hotels, as this is essentially a licensing deal that gives them the use of the Atari name.
  • In terms of new products bearing the company name, I think I’d much rather have the oft-delayed Atari VCS retro console, but no way would I ever say no to a stay in a gaming-themed hotel.
  • And hey, if that $600k it received for licensing the name for the hotel helps get the VCS out the door, then it’s a win-win.

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