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Articles related to "object"


KiCad 5.1.0 Release

  • The KiCad project is proud to announce the release of version 5.1.0.
  • This is the first ever minor version release of KiCad and was developed primarily to resolve compatibility issues with Linux GTK3 and long awaited support for python3.
  • Improved 3D model library path configuration.
  • Schematic and symbol library editors now use the modern canvases for rendering.
  • Both the footprint and symbol library editors now share the same user interface paradigm with a library tree view pane.
  • Symbol, footprint, and 3D model library improvements.
  • Less pain for Linux package maintainers, now all features should be easy to support.
  • This version will be the only supported version of KiCad moving forward.
  • Thank you to all developers, packagers, librarians, document writers, translators, and everyone else who helped make this release possible.

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Getting started with fp-ts: Category

  • In the last posts we saw some basic abstractions used in functional programming: Setoid, Ord, Semigroup and Monoid.
  • In the next posts we will explore some advanced abstractions that make functional programming even more interesting.
  • Storically the first advanced abstraction contained in fp-ts is Functor, but before we can talk about functors we need to learn something about categories since functors are built upon them.
  • A corner stone of functional programming is composition.
  • Categories capture the essence of composition.
  • The term "object" here has nothing to do with OOP, you can think of objects as black boxes you can't inspect, or even as some kind of ancillary placeholders for morphisms.
  • Each morphism f has a source object A and a target object B where A and B are in Objects.
  • We write f: A ⟼ B, and we say "f is a morphism from A to B".

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Getting started with fp-ts: Category

  • In the last posts we saw some basic abstractions used in functional programming: Setoid, Ord, Semigroup and Monoid.
  • In the next posts we will explore some advanced abstractions that make functional programming even more interesting.
  • Storically the first advanced abstraction contained in fp-ts is Functor, but before we can talk about functors we need to learn something about categories since functors are built upon them.
  • A corner stone of functional programming is composition.
  • Categories capture the essence of composition.
  • The term "object" here has nothing to do with OOP, you can think of objects as black boxes you can't inspect, or even as some kind of ancillary placeholders for morphisms.
  • Each morphism f has a source object A and a target object B where A and B are in Objects.
  • We write f: A ⟼ B, and we say "f is a morphism from A to B".

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Where Do I Put My Business Rules And Validation?

  • In DDD, it's a good practice for business rules and validation to go into the value objects.
  • By testing whether a value object is valid at creation time we ensure that it's not possible to have a value object that is in an invalid state.
  • Let's look at a real-world example of how you might use value objects to perform business validation.
  • There's an entire area of study around modelling entities and value objects.
  • When creating objects using this technique, is usually recommended to not name your value objects and entities right away.
  • This satisfies the property of value objects needing to be valid at creation time.
  • Let's now name our value objects and create an entity for our overall insurance policy.
  • You might notice that testing your value objects can make testing specific business rules very easy!

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How to find the max id in an array of objects in JavaScript

  • Whenever that red flag of iterating over an array comes up I immediatly ask myself is this something that map/filter/reduce can solve.
  • The map() method creates a new array with the results of calling a provided function on every element in the calling array.
  • You will use the map method to create a new array that contains just the id's so you're no longer working with objects.
  • The reduce() method executes a reducer function (that you provide) on each member of the array resulting in a single output value.
  • Every time the callback function is called it will return a value and store it in max.
  • You can also use a combination of reduce and the next solution Math.max() if you want to.
  • This means that you can use the map function to get an array of id's and then pass it into the max() function using the spread operator.

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Chicken Scheme internals: the garbage collector (2014)

  • This particular implementation probably can't use a copying garbage collector like CHICKEN uses, because the SCM_obj pointers which store the Scheme objects' locations would all become invalid.
  • An SCM_call is returned to the driver loop by every generated C function: this holds a continuation and the arguments with which to invoke it.
  • Anyway, going back to the big picture we can see that this continuation-based approach consumes a more or less constant amount of stack space, because each function returns to driver_loop.
  • Besides, by returning to the trampoline function whenever a new continuation is invoked, anything you'd store on the stack would need to get purged (that's how the C calling convention works).
  • However, this program is a lot longer due to one important thing: At the start of each continuation function we first check to see if there's enough space left on the stack to accommodate the objects this function will allocate.

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