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Articles related to "officials"


Gymnastics deaths are rare, but previous disasters have prompted safety changes

  • And as difficulty levels soar to new heights, so do the risks of serious injury.
  • But during a competition before the 1988 Seoul Olympics, she slipped on a springboard that was supposed to propel her over the vaulting horse -- the table that vaulters bounce their hands off of before flipping in the air.
  • Julissa's head smashed into the horse, paralyzing her from the neck down.
  • But more gymnasts suffered catastrophic injuries on the vault, leading to paralysis.
  • Of course, catastrophic injuries such as paralysis are rare.
  • About 100,000 gymnasts suffer injuries every year, according to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
  • More recently, the debate over dangerous skills emerged this year when Olympic champion Simone Biles introduced a double-double dismount off the balance beam.
  • But the International Gymnastics Federation defended its scoring of Biles' astonishing new dismount, citing safety reasons.

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A stream along the South Korean border turned red after the government slaughtered thousands of pigs infected with swine fever

  • North Korea reported its first instance of swine fever-infected pigs earlier this year after the virus hopped the Chinese border.
  • South Korea had managed to keep the virus from entering its border until this September when officials say an infected North Korean feral hog crossed the demilitarized zone making its way south past 2.5 miles of landmines.
  • Since the infection broke out, South Korea officials have culled nearly 400,000 pigs in a desperate attempt to stop the virus from spreading.
  • Eventually, the blood from the thousands of pigs made its way to a tributary where, if not stopped, would eventually contaminate the Imjin River, the main freshwater source for many of Seoul's nine million residents.
  • In a race to stop the stream of blood, South Korean officials hastily built dikes and used pumps to halt the contaminated water, The New York Times reported.

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How a turf war and a botched contract landed 2 pentesters in Iowa jail

  • Two men who had tripped an alarm after popping open a locked door were wandering through courtrooms on the third floor, she reported over the radio as deputies raced to the scene.
  • They then presented the deputies with a letter that explained the intruders weren’t criminals but rather penetration testers who had been hired by Iowa’s State Court Administration to test the security of its court information system.
  • Leonard said that Iowa’s State Court Administration, or SCA, didn’t have the legal authority to permit the men to force their way into the county-owned building.
  • Coalfire CEO Tom McAndrew said in a statement last month that Leonard “failed to exercise commonsense and good judgement and turned this engagement into a political battle between the State and the County.” McAndrew also noted that Coalfire conducted an engagement for Iowa’s SCA in 2015 without incident.

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Venice swamped in second-highest flood on record

  • Milan | Venice's mayor prepared to declare the city a disaster zone on Wednesday after the second highest tide ever recorded flooded its historic basilica and left many of its squares and alleyways deep under water.
  • Saint Mark's Square was submerged by more than one metre of water, while the adjacent Saint Mark's Basilica was flooded for only the sixth time in 1200 years.
  • Already on Tuesday, much of the city was under water, inundating the famed St Mark's Basilica and raising anew concerns over damage to the mosaics and other artworks.
  • Called "Moses," the moveable under-sea barriers are meant to limit flooding of the city, caused by southerly winds that push the tide into Venice.
  • The historic canal city was inundated by the second-highest flood on record with St Mark's Basilica filled with water for only the sixth time in 1200 years.

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Thousands of birds found dead by an Indian lake and no one knows why

  • Locals spotted the carcasses on Sunday along the shores of Sambhar Salt Lake in the northwestern state of Rajasthan, Arun Prasad, the state's Chief Conservator of Forests, told CNN Wednesday.
  • They alerted state forest officials who found around 2,400 dead birds -- including 20 migratory species that flock to the lake each year.
  • Images published by CNN affiliate News18 showed bird carcasses scattered over a large area beside the lake, which covers an area of 190 square kilometers (73 square miles) at full capacity.
  • Officials have collected some bird carcasses and water samples and sent them to a pathology lab in central Madhya Pradesh state to be examined, Prasad said.
  • Prasad said the mass deaths were unlikely to be due to disease because local birds were continuing to forage at nearby water bodies and wetlands.

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Suspicionless phone searches at the border are unconstitutional, court rules

  • Casper reigns in Department of Homeland Security policies that gave officials wide legal authority to search the belongings, including electronic devices, of travelers entering and exiting the country.
  • They argued the Customs and Border Protection and ICE policies that allow border searches of electronic devices without a warrant violate the Fourth Amendment, which protects against unreasonable search and seizure.
  • It was a win in part for the travelers, as the judge limited searches at the border to those based on "reasonable suspicion," but did not rule that officials needed to obtain a warrant.
  • CNN has reached out to US Customs and Border Protection, as well as the US Department of Homeland Security for comment.
  • Officers were allowed to request passcodes and detain devices that were encrypted or inaccessible for further review.
  • Last year, CBP called searches at the border "essential" to enforcing the law and national security.

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Convicted US soldier could soon have sentence commuted after Trump ordered review of charges, lawyer says

  • Washington (CNN) - A US service member who was found guilty in 2013 of second-degree murder for ordering his men to fire on three men on a motorcycle in Afghanistan could soon have his sentence commuted by President Donald Trump, his lawyer told CNN late Tuesday.
  • Army Lt. Clint Lorance has been ordered by the inmate administration to start clearing for out processing, his lawyer, John Maher, told CNN.
  • CNN previously reported that Defense Secretary Mark Esper planned to urge Trump not to dismiss or change the sentences of service members facing war crimes allegations.
  • Those leaders, like most Army and Navy military and civilian officials, are expressing extreme dismay at the possibility that the service members' sentences could be dismissed or changed, according to several sources directly familiar with their thinking.

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Border agents can't search phones, laptops for no reason, judge rules - Business Insider

  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Patrol agents will no longer be able to indiscriminately search the phones and laptops of travelers crossing the US border, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.
  • Before Tuesday's court ruling, there was no clear legal precedent to determine whether Fourth Amendment protections extended to people entering the US internationally — in its absence, DHS officials operated under CBP Directive No. 3340-049A, which declared that agents could search anyone's electronic devices for any reason.
  • In August, a Lebanese student who was admitted to Harvard University was temporarily detained by Border Patrol agents in Boston who searched his phone and laptop.
  • CBP has reportedly also targeted journalists and activists crossing the border, searching their electronic devices for sensitive information.

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Border agents can't search phones, laptops for no reason, judge rules - Business Insider

  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Patrol agents will no longer be able to indiscriminately search the phones and laptops of travelers crossing the US border, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.
  • Before Tuesday's court ruling, there was no clear legal precedent to determine whether Fourth Amendment protections extended to people entering the US internationally — in its absence, DHS officials operated under CBP Directive No. 3340-049A, which declared that agents could search anyone's electronic devices for any reason.
  • In August, a Lebanese student who was admitted to Harvard University was temporarily detained by Border Patrol agents in Boston who searched his phone and laptop.
  • CBP has reportedly also targeted journalists and activists crossing the border, searching their electronic devices for sensitive information.

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A new ruling bars border agents from searching travelers' phones or laptops for no reason, and privacy advocates are calling it a major victory

  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Patrol agents will no longer be able to indiscriminately search the phones and laptops of travelers crossing the US border, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.
  • Before Tuesday's court ruling, there was no clear legal precedent to determine whether Fourth Amendment protections extended to people entering the US internationally — in its absence, DHS officials operated under CBP Directive No. 3340-049A, which declared that agents could search anyone's electronic devices for any reason.
  • In August, a Lebanese student who was admitted to Harvard University was temporarily detained by Border Patrol agents in Boston who searched his phone and laptop.
  • CBP has reportedly also targeted journalists and activists crossing the border, searching their electronic devices for sensitive information.

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