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Articles related to "package"


Simple Python Environments For Data Science 🐍

  • Virtual environments allow you to create different versions of python with packages specific to each project that you are working on.
  • When you create a new virtual environment you are specifying the versions of python and a versions of the packages you need in order to prevent those awful import errors we all hate.
  • Pipenv is built to be a replacement for pip and virtualenv to create a simpler work flow for creating environments in python.
  • To install new packages into your environment simply run pipenv install [package name] while the project is active.
  • Now that we have a few options to create and manage virtual environments we will demonstrate creating and using the environments to get a jupyter notebook installed and ready for data science action.
  • Now any time you want to work in a jupyter notebook you simply activate the environment and launch it in your project of choice.

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KiCad 5.1.0 Release

  • The KiCad project is proud to announce the release of version 5.1.0.
  • This is the first ever minor version release of KiCad and was developed primarily to resolve compatibility issues with Linux GTK3 and long awaited support for python3.
  • Improved 3D model library path configuration.
  • Schematic and symbol library editors now use the modern canvases for rendering.
  • Both the footprint and symbol library editors now share the same user interface paradigm with a library tree view pane.
  • Symbol, footprint, and 3D model library improvements.
  • Less pain for Linux package maintainers, now all features should be easy to support.
  • This version will be the only supported version of KiCad moving forward.
  • Thank you to all developers, packagers, librarians, document writers, translators, and everyone else who helped make this release possible.

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Using npm's `ls` command for Fun and Insight

  • If you're not familiar with npm ls, it's a command available with the npm CLI that will list dependencies that have been installed to node_modules.
  • Additionally, it will return a non-zero exit code if the dependency tree that's resolved in node_modules is not what should be resolved from package.json.
  • This particular feature is incredibly useful to me, as one of the most common ways that you'll introduce security vulnerabilities is through your dependency tree (rather than directly introducing them in package.json).
  • Being able to surface all instances of a specific module you know is vulnerable is extremely useful, and this command makes that super simple.
  • In a recent discussion in the Node.js Package Maintenance team, usage of npm ls in CI/CD environments was raised as a possible best practice to ensure that the dependency tree that's being resolved by npm is entirely valid and will be able to run.

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Child abuse may change brain structure and make depression worse

  • A study of over a hundred people’s brains suggests that abuse during childhood is linked to changes in brain structure that may make depression more severe in later life.
  • Nils Opel at the University of Münster, Germany, and his colleagues scanned the brains of 110 adults hospitalised for major depressive disorder and asked them about the severity of their depression and whether they had experienced neglect or emotional, sexual or physical abuse during childhood.
  • Statistical analysis revealed that those who experienced childhood abuse were more likely to have a smaller insular cortex – a brain region involved in emotional awareness.
  • The team found that those who had both a history of childhood abuse and a smaller insular cortex were more likely to have a relapse.
  • The findings suggest that people with depression who experienced abuse as children could need specialised treatment, he says.

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Genetics studies are too white – that’s failing people and science

  • A selection of top articles hand-picked by our editors available only to registered users.
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  • We are at the beginning of a revolution in medicine, in which a burgeoning knowledge of the genetics of disease promises treatments tailored to individual needs.
  • But there is a big obstacle in the way: our failure to incorporate diverse, representative populations in our studies.
  • The incomplete knowledge of the genetics of disease and treatment response across populations is not only affecting treatment outcomes for individuals – it is also hampering our understanding of the basic science.
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Stunning picture shows dead star racing away from a massive explosion

  • That is what happened to the pulsar pictured here, sending it racing away from its home with a tail of particles and magnetic energy stretching behind it for 13 light years.
  • In the image above, the star is at the left end of the yellow tail and is heading away from the big bubble.
  • The pulsar is known as PSR J0002+6216 and is located 6500 light years from Earth.
  • It is speeding away from the supernova at more than 1100 kilometres per second – much faster than most pulsars, which average about 240 kilometres per second, and enough to let it escape the Milky Way. The expanding debris initially outpaced the pulsar, but slowed as it met up with dust and gas in the surrounding space.
  • After 5000 years, the pulsar caught up with edge of the supernova remnant and busted free.
  • It has been another 5000 years since then, and the pulsar is now 53 light years away from the centre of the remnant.

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Sun bears copy each other's facial expressions to communicate

  • The world’s smallest bears copy one another’s facial expressions as a means of communication.
  • In total, 21 matched the open-mouthed expressions of their playmates during face-to-face interactions.
  • When they were facing each other, 13 bears made expressions within one second of observing a similar expression from their playmate.
  • Sun bears have no special evolutionary link to humans unlike monkeys or apes, nor are they domesticated animals like dogs.
  • The team believes this means the behaviour must also be present in various other species.
  • Also known as honey bears, sun bears are the smallest in the bear family.
  • While the bears prefer a solitary life, the team says that they engage in gentle and rough play and may use facial mimicry to indicate they are ready to play more roughly or strengthen social bonds.

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Robot swarm inspired by cells can keep moving even if its parts fail

  • A swarm of robots inspired by living cells can squeeze through gaps and keep moving even if many of its parts fail.
  • Individually, the bots can’t move, but once stuck together, the swarm can slither across a surface by making individual bots expand and contract at different times.
  • “This entire chunk can move around and slither through gaps,” says Lipson.
  • Many biologically inspired robots look like animals, but are constructed from complex components that make it difficult for them to heal or adapt their shape, says Lipson.
  • The swarm was still able to move around even when 20 per cent of individual bots weren’t working – an advantage over conventional robots that may completely malfunction when a single component fails.
  • Individual bots were programmed to vary the timing of their expansions and contractions according to the intensity of the light they sensed, enabling the swarm to move towards an object.

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We have to find a way to stop drones disrupting airports

  • A selection of top articles hand-picked by our editors available only to registered users.
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  • Drones near airports are grounding flights and leaving people miserable, but can we actually find a way to stop them?
  • GATWICK.
  • Heathrow.
  • Newark.
  • Dubai.
  • Dublin.
  • In the past four months, airports have been brought to a standstill by the sight of drones hovering above runways.
  • Last week, rules came into force in the UK that make it illegal to fly drones within 5 kilometres of an airport.
  • But is there anything more we can do to stop them becoming a weaponised nuisance?
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I got caught in the middle of a bitter row over humans' violent past

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  • Once upon a time, the narrative of humanity’s past belonged largely to archaeologists and anthropologists.
  • In recent years, geneticists have muscled in, making startling discoveries by analysing DNA from ancient specimens – and leaving some archaeologists feeling sidelined.
  • A new study has thrown the feud into stark relief.
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