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Articles related to "people"


Walmart Plus drops $35 order minimum to battle Amazon Prime

  • Walmart hasn’t been shy about challenging Amazon Prime with its Plus service, and that now includes no-charge shipping.
  • CNBC reports that Walmart Plus is dropping its $35 order minimum for free one- or two-day shipping as of December 4th.
  • You won’t have to add something superfluous to your order just to get free shipping for a must-have item, in other words.
  • The loosened restrictions don’t apply to deliveries from Walmart stores for items like groceries.
  • You might be more likely to buy from Walmart if you aren’t worried about reaching a certain threshold every time you make a purchase.
  • It’s not clear how this will affect your ability to get orders during a holiday season where online shipping will play a vital role.
  • Regardless, this could be welcome if you’re not keen on risking your health just to buy some toys at the local store.

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Queens, one of the first COVID-19 epicenters, faces a new crisis: hunger

  • During the summer, numerous social-services organizations across New York City reported at least 75 percent of their immigrant clients had lost jobs because of the pandemic.
  • Since March, the lines have regularly wrapped around street corners and stretched on for blocks at Queens food banks like La Jornada, a network of pantries across the borough run by an Evangelical nonprofit, and CENTI, a church-run pantry in Jackson Heights.
  • People like Braulio and Nelly, an older couple who have lived in a rented basement room in Flushing for years while sending money back home to Ecuador to pay for their children’s studies; Huang, from Fujian, China, who lost his job in a Chinese restaurant when it closed because of the virus; and Lutfun from Bangladesh, a mother of two whose husband hasn’t gotten behind the wheel of his taxicab (a business already suffering) since he fell ill with COVID-19 in the spring.

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Pfizer coronavirus vaccine: No corners have been cut in approving vaccine, British regulator says

  • London | Britain's medical regulator has said "no corners were cut" in its evaluation of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, despite having flashed the green light well ahead of the US, Europe and Australia.
  • In a major boost for Prime Minister Boris Johnson's beleaguered government, the MHRA approved the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine on late on Wednesday (AEDT), after the company announced last month its two-dose jab was 95 per cent effective at preventing COVID-19.
  • Britain will now begin vaccinating aged-care home residents as soon as next week, Mr Johnson said.
  • The Europeans' more conservative approach may reflect the need for the authorities to project greater reassurance: vaccine scepticism is much more prevalent on the Continent than in Britain.
  • Britain has become the first country to approve the Pfizer vaccine and will roll it out next week.

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What does aggregation theory tell us about Google’s antitrust case?

  • Suddenly, you have intermediaries like Amazon that wield a lot of their power by controlling the supply of consumers.
  • (Our video above covers the basics.) It’s a detailed and compelling case for why internet-era business is different from what came before, with a lot of implications for anyone doing business with them.
  • The argument started with a post from Columbia Law professor Tim Wu, trying to carve out a place for antitrust action into aggregation theory’s broader story about tech companies competing to better serve consumers.
  • Google is currently fighting an ambitious antitrust case from the US Department of Justice, and skeptics in Congress are pushing similar arguments against Facebook, Amazon, and Apple.
  • But those antitrust cases argue that internet companies got so big by using market power to drive out competitors through acquisitions, predatory pricing, or other exclusionary deals.

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GPT-3 Has Learned to Code, Blog and Argue

  • This new system, GPT-3, had spent those months learning the ins and outs of natural language by analyzing thousands of digital books, the length and breadth of Wikipedia, and nearly a trillion words posted to blogs, social media and the rest of the internet.
  • But GPT-3 — which learned from a far larger collection of online text than previous systems — opens the door to a wide range of new possibilities, such as software that can speed the development of new smartphone apps, or chatbots that can converse in far more human ways than past technologies.
  • About three years ago, researchers at Google and top labs like OpenAI started designing neural networks that learned from enormous amounts of prose, including unpublished books and Wikipedia articles by the thousands.

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Who gets Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine first in UK, and how many people - Business Insider

  • The COVID-19 vaccine developed by the US pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech was approved by the British drug regulator on Wednesday — making the UK the first Western country to give the green light to a coronavirus shot.
  • In a statement, the government said that the vaccine would be available within a week and that care-home residents and their carers would be first in line.
  • UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock told the BBC on Wednesday that the country would receive 800,000 doses of the vaccine next week from Belgium, where Pfizer is producing the UK's vaccine supply.
  • Hancock said "many millions" of Pfizer's vaccine doses could be available this year, but he declined to state a precise figure.
  • The two-shot vaccine will first be made available to care-home residents and those caring for them, people over the age of 80, and frontline healthcare workers, Hancock said.

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In plain sight: the ghosts of segregation

  • Vestiges of racism and oppression, from bricked-over segregated entrances to the forgotten sites of racial violence, still permeate much of America’s built environment.
  • Several years ago, I began to photographically document vestiges of racism, oppression and segregation in America’s built and natural environments — lingering traces that were hidden in plain sight behind a veil of banality.
  • Some of the sites I found were unmarked, overlooked and largely forgotten: bricked-over “Colored” entrances to movie theaters, or walls built inside restaurants to separate nonwhite customers.
  • In 2018, I was perusing the website for the Seattle Civil Rights & Labor History Project, which led me to a theater company site that mentioned the Moore Theatre’s segregated entrance.
  • And these pictures prove that if you look carefully enough, you’ll find that the evidence of the structures of segregation — and the marks of white supremacy — still surrounds us, embedded in the landscape of our day-to-day lives.

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UK approves Pfizer vaccine rollout

  • Immunisations could start within days for those who need it the most, such as elderly people in care homes.
  • The UK has already ordered 40m doses - enough to vaccinate 20m people.
  • Although vaccination can start, people still need to remain vigilant and follow coronavirus rules to stop the spread, say experts.
  • It is a new type called an mRNA vaccine that uses a tiny fragment of genetic code from the pandemic virus to teach the body how to fight Covid-19 and build immunity.
  • An mRNA vaccine has never been approved for use in humans before, although people have received them in clinical trials.
  • One from Moderna uses the same mRNA approach as the Pfizer vaccine and offers similar protection.
  • The UK has ordered 100m doses of a different type of Covid vaccine from Oxford University and AstraZeneca.

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Covid Pfizer vaccine approved for use next week in UK

  • Immunisations could start within days for those who need it the most, such as elderly people in care homes.
  • The UK has already ordered 40m doses - enough to vaccinate 20m people.
  • Although vaccination can start, people still need to remain vigilant and follow coronavirus rules to stop the spread, say experts.
  • It is a new type called an mRNA vaccine that uses a tiny fragment of genetic code from the pandemic virus to teach the body how to fight Covid-19 and build immunity.
  • An mRNA vaccine has never been approved for use in humans before, although people have received them in clinical trials.
  • One from Moderna uses the same mRNA approach as the Pfizer vaccine and offers similar protection.
  • The UK has ordered 100m doses of a different type of Covid vaccine from Oxford University and AstraZeneca.

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CDC experts voted: Here’s who should get the first COVID-19 vaccine doses

  • The very first doses of any approved COVID-19 vaccine should go to both front-line healthcare workers and residents of long-term care facilities, a committee of expert advisors for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended in an emergency meeting Tuesday evening.
  • In a press briefing last week, top officials for Operation Warp Speed—the federal government’s program to swiftly develop and deliver COVID-19 vaccines and therapies—said that the first 6.4 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine will be distributed to states on a per capita basis—to “keep this simple.” The decision was a reversal for Warp Speed, which previously suggested it would allocate vaccine based on each state’s high-risk groups—matching the ACIP recommendations.
  • The committee noted that there’s an estimated 21 million or so frontline health workers and about 3 million long-term care facility residents who would be covered in the Phase 1a distribution.The total number of people covered is just over the estimated 20 million vaccine doses expected to be available this month.

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