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Articles related to "plant"


Tyson taps new CEO after more than 10,200 workers catch COVID-19 - Business Insider

  • Tyson Foods tapped a new CEO, after the coronavirus pandemic sparked one of the most "volatile and uncertain" periods the company has ever seen.
  • While less than 1,200 Tyson workers have COVID-19 at this moment in time, thousands more have been diagnosed with the coronavirus in recent months.
  • The Food and Environment Reporting Network (FERN) identified at least 10,261 reported COVID-19 cases among Tyson meat processing workers from mid-April to mid-July.
  • According to FERN, more Tyson workers have tested positive for COVID-19 than employees at any other company in the industry.
  • Tyson did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment on lawsuits filed against the company in recent months.
  • In May, the family of Pwar Gay, who worked as a meat cutter at a Amarillo, Texas plant, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Tyson.

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Tyson taps new CEO after more than 10,200 workers catch COVID-19 - Business Insider

  • Tyson Foods tapped a new CEO, after the coronavirus pandemic sparked one of the most "volatile and uncertain" periods the company has ever seen.
  • While less than 1,200 Tyson workers have COVID-19 at this moment in time, thousands more have been diagnosed with the coronavirus in recent months.
  • The Food and Environment Reporting Network (FERN) identified at least 10,261 reported COVID-19 cases among Tyson meat processing workers from mid-April to mid-July.
  • According to FERN, more Tyson workers have tested positive for COVID-19 than employees at any other company in the industry.
  • Tyson did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment on lawsuits filed against the company in recent months.
  • In May, the family of Pwar Gay, who worked as a meat cutter at a Amarillo, Texas plant, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Tyson.

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Why Are Plants Green? The Answer Might Work on Any Planet

  • But to learn why plants reflect green light, Gabor and a team that included Richard Cogdell, a botanist at the University of Glasgow, looked more closely at what happens during photosynthesis as a problem in network theory.
  • Gabor and his team developed a model for the light-harvesting systems of plants and applied it to the solar spectrum measured below a canopy of leaves.
  • Their work made it clear why what works for nanotube solar cells doesn’t work for plants: It might be highly efficient to specialize in collecting just the peak energy in green light, but that would be detrimental for plants because, when the sunlight flickered, the noise from the input signal would fluctuate too wildly for the complex to regulate the energy flow.
  • The model’s predictions matched the absorption peaks of chlorophyll a and b, which green plants use to harvest red and blue light.

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Oil-rich UAE opens the Arab world's first nuclear power plant. Experts question why

  • Unit 1 of the Barakah plant in the Al Dhafrah region of Abu Dhabi started producing heat on Saturday, the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation said in a statement.
  • The corporation said the construction of Unit 2 has finished recently, while the other two reactors are still being built -- even though the original schedule called for the plant to become operational by 2017.
  • Once completed, the four reactors, which are using South Korean technology, should produce 5.6 gigawatts of electricity and supply up to 25% of the UAE's electricity needs, the corporation said.
  • The new plant is part of the UAE's plan to become less reliant on oil and gas, the current source of the vast majority of its energy.
  • However, some experts have questioned the need for the nuclear power plant given the country's potential to develop solar energy and the tensions surrounding nuclear power in the Middle East.

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Stopping Pollution with Pine Needles

  • The other is pollution by heavy metals, particularly lead, of some of the country’s water supply.
  • Heavy-metal pollution is by no means the only water-quality problem facing India, but it is one of the most pernicious.
  • One way to extract heavy metals like lead from polluted water is to pass that water through charcoal filters.
  • The upshot is that biochar is good at pulling pollutants like lead out of water.
  • Dr Mohan already knew, from previous work, that pine-wood biochar is an effective agent for stripping lead from water.
  • Experiments suggested that material charred at 550°C extracted lead most efficiently, and examination showed that this material had the largest internal surface area per gram (determined by a technique that measures a substance’s ability to adsorb gases), and the optimal level of carbonisation needed to preserve the metal-capturing organic compounds.

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Why Are Plants Green? To Reduce the Noise in Photosynthesis

  • But to learn why plants reflect green light, Gabor and a team that included Richard Cogdell, a botanist at the University of Glasgow, looked more closely at what happens during photosynthesis as a problem in network theory.
  • Gabor and his team developed a model for the light-harvesting systems of plants and applied it to the solar spectrum measured below a canopy of leaves.
  • Their work made it clear why what works for nanotube solar cells doesn’t work for plants: It might be highly efficient to specialize in collecting just the peak energy in green light, but that would be detrimental for plants because, when the sunlight flickered, the noise from the input signal would fluctuate too wildly for the complex to regulate the energy flow.
  • The model’s predictions matched the absorption peaks of chlorophyll a and b, which green plants use to harvest red and blue light.

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In Colombia, scientists are finding new species in uncharted territory

  • Colombia is the world's second most biodiverse country, with around 6,500 species of plants and lichens unique to the country, Diazgranados estimates.
  • Diazgranados says if areas of land now safe from conflict are not quickly protected by the government, they are susceptible to deforestation for cattle and agriculture, and also illegal mining and illegal logging.
  • Over 1,000 plant species grow in the area and locals have already highlighted 77 to add to the book, including the carana tree.
  • With its huge number of endemic plant species, Diazgranados says Colombia is fertile ground for the discovery of new medicines, including antibiotics.
  • There are fewer glaciers in the mountains, he adds, and in paramo ecosystems -- areas of high grassland -- climate change is causing plant distribution to shrink.

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