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Articles related to "public"


Sanitation conquered disease long before vaccines or antibiotics

  • In an earlier post, I outlined our main weapons against infectious disease, including vaccines, antibiotics, antiseptics, pest control, sanitation, and general hygiene.
  • These estimates are rough, but they generally show that death rates began to fall in some parts of Europe by 1740 (and in some parts possibly as early as 1670),3 and that declines in disease mortality were a significant part of this.
  • Measures of one or another variety were adopted in many British cities and towns in the Improvement Acts of the 1760s and thereafter, and observers, such as William White in York, attributed declines in mortality specifically to them.
  • Thus the germ theory, long before it led to medical treatments, drove down mortality rates by revolutionizing sanitation and hygiene.
  • So the mortality data points to a large and easy-to-underappreciate role of pest control, water sanitation, food handling, and general hygiene.

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J. Crew hires former head of Victoria's Secret as its new CEO

  • Crew has turned to an executive from another struggling brand, Victoria's Secret, to lead its turnaround.
  • Crew's new CEO, the company said Tuesday.
  • Singer became Victoria's Secret chief executive in 2016, but she left the company in 2018 amid a sales slump and competition from online lingerie brands.
  • Singer, 55, also was CEO of Spanx and worked in executive roles at Nike and other retailers.
  • J. Crew has been searching for a permanent chief executive since 2018, when former CEO Jim Brett, who came from West Elm, resigned less than two years into the role.
  • Brett left the company because of a disagreement with the board of directors over how to "evolve" J.
  • Crew announced it planned to spin off Madewell, its fast-growing denim brand, into a separate public company.
  • A successful Madewell IPO could help J Crew pay down a "meaningful portion" of its debt, she said.

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US military's Special Operations Command says its newest recruits may have an 'unhealthy sense of entitlement'

  • A new internal review by US Special Operations Command says an "unhealthy sense of entitlement" was fostered among its newest candidates during their training process.
  • The unclassified report, titled "Comprehensive Review of Special Operations Forces," focused on the culture and ethics in the special-operations community, which includes Navy SEALs, Army Delta Force, Marine Corps Raiders, and Air Force Pararescue specialists.
  • The review also comes amid numerous reports of misconduct within the elite communities in recent months.
  • In one instance in September, three senior leaders from a Navy SEAL Team were fired after "leadership failure," including sexual assault and drinking alcohol during a deployment to Iraq.
  • In a letter to SOCOM members following the report, the command's senior leaders stressed that there were areas where improvement was needed.

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Why one Wall Street firm thinks Uber is poised to surge 54% in the next year

  • Uber gained another bullish Wall Street analyst this week, despite trading down about 19% from its May initial public offering.
  • On Tuesday, UBS initiated coverage of Uber with a price target of $56, roughly 54% higher than where shares traded at Monday's close.
  • "We expect Ridesharing bookings to grow at a 15% '19E-'24E compound annual growth rate with adjusted net revenue growing at a 17% compound annual growth rate" during the same period, according to the note.
  • And third, UBS thinks that Uber can expand its margins and turn a profit on an Ebitda basis by 2021.
  • UBS expects that Uber's adjusted Ebitda will hit $43 million in 2021, up from a loss of $2.8 billion in 2019, according to the note.
  • Further, UBS forecasts that Uber will achieve a roughly 14% adjusted Ebitda margin in its 2024 estimates.

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To contain disease outbreaks, health officials rely on people’s trust

  • As the coronavirus outbreak continues to spread, the Chinese government and health officials around the world are counting on an intangible factor to help them contain the virus: trust.
  • “In West Africa, during the Ebola crisis, people distrusted government not because they were uninformed, but because in the past, the government had done things that weren’t trustworthy,” he says.
  • Many people living in China have good reasons to feel the same way: during the SARS outbreak in 2002 and 2003, the Chinese government mislead public health officials and attempted to conceal the extent of the problem.
  • While the World Health Organization has said that Chinese officials are being more transparent during this outbreak, people living through it are less confident that their government is telling them the whole story.
  • Blair says that there may also be less compliance with public health practices in China if trust is that low, just as there was in Liberia.

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As Trump's impeachment focuses on corruption in Ukraine, a Ukrainian activist says Americans are the ones 'eager to take dirty money'

  • And therefore, it came to me as a huge disappointment and surprise, the fact that the president of the United States and his allies, specifically Rudy Giuliani, were expecting from Ukrainian newly elected President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to actually interfere into the work of the Ukrainian prosecutor general office and to pursue a very specific investigation, which would favor political interests of these people in the United States.
  • And that makes me very angry, because those who are telling the truth and those who are protecting, actually, the national interests of the United States from Russian disinformation and from the corrupt kleptocrats, from oligarchs, they are under attack in their homeland.
  • Kaleniuk: Blue Star Strategies — this is the PR firm from the United States, which had an order to discredit our organization.

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One of Beyond Meat's earliest bulls downgrades the stock, saying its soaring price bakes in 'plenty of potentially good news'

  • JPMorgan issued a "buy"-equivalent rating for Beyond Meat about three weeks after its May 2 initial public offering, but the bank now holds a "more balanced risk/reward outlook" on the stock.
  • Goldman cut his 12-month price target for the plant-based-meat company to $134 per share from $138, implying a 7.4% gain from Monday's closing price.
  • Beyond Meat was among the few companies to notch major gains in Monday trading as the greater stock market tumbled on coronavirus fears.
  • The stock "now bakes in plenty of potentially good news," and the bank's downgrade is "largely a valuation call," Goldman wrote.
  • Beyond Meat closed at $124.75 per share on Monday, up roughly 68% year-to-date.
  • The company has two "buy" ratings, 11 "hold" ratings, and four "sell" ratings, with a consensus price target of $102.12, according to Bloomberg data.

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AOC slams Trump's 'shameful' wealth test for immigrants - Business Insider

  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slammed President Donald Trump's plan to deny green cards to immigrants who even occasionally use public benefits after the Supreme Court voted to allow it on Monday.
  • Trump wants to tighten a rule allowing the government to deny permanent legal status to immigrants at risk of becoming "public charges." Previously, fewer than 1% of green-card applicants were disqualified on public-charge grounds, according to the New York Times.
  • The president intends to withhold green cards from those who use benefits such as food stamps, housing vouchers, and Medicaid in any 12 months within a 36-month period, the New York Times reported.
  • Opponents have filed challenges in courts across the country.
  • Ocasio-Cortez describes herself as a democratic socialist.
  • She recently blasted billionaires for exploiting workers, and criticized Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg for arguing tuition-free public college should exclude the rich.

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AOC slams Trump's 'shameful' wealth test for immigrants - Business Insider

  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slammed President Donald Trump's plan to deny green cards to immigrants who even occasionally use public benefits after the Supreme Court voted to allow it on Monday.
  • Trump wants to tighten a rule allowing the government to deny permanent legal status to immigrants at risk of becoming "public charges." Previously, fewer than 1% of green-card applicants were disqualified on public-charge grounds, according to the New York Times.
  • The president intends to withhold green cards from those who use benefits such as food stamps, housing vouchers, and Medicaid in any 12 months within a 36-month period, the New York Times reported.
  • Opponents have filed challenges in courts across the country.
  • Ocasio-Cortez describes herself as a democratic socialist.
  • She recently blasted billionaires for exploiting workers, and criticized Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg for arguing tuition-free public college should exclude the rich.

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'The American Dream isn't a private club with a cover charge': Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez trashes Trump's wealth test for immigrants

  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slammed President Donald Trump's plan to deny green cards to immigrants who even occasionally use public benefits after the Supreme Court voted to allow it on Monday.
  • Trump wants to tighten a rule allowing the government to deny permanent legal status to immigrants at risk of becoming "public charges." Previously, fewer than 1% of green-card applicants were disqualified on public-charge grounds, according to the New York Times.
  • The president intends to withhold green cards from those who use benefits such as food stamps, housing vouchers, and Medicaid in any 12 months within a 36-month period, the New York Times reported.
  • Opponents have filed challenges in courts across the country.
  • Ocasio-Cortez describes herself as a democratic socialist.
  • She recently blasted billionaires for exploiting workers, and criticized Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg for arguing tuition-free public college should exclude the rich.

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