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Articles related to "rate"


How scientists know COVID-19 is way deadlier than the flu

  • Using a more sophisticated calculation called the infection-fatality rate, paired with the past few months’ worth of data, the latest best estimates show that COVID-19 is around 50 to 100 times more lethal than the seasonal flu, on average.
  • This statistical tool uses data on known infections, including best estimates for undiagnosed and asymptomatic cases, to put numbers on how likely it is for an infected person to die from the disease.
  • Using a statistical model, epidemiologists at Columbia University estimated the infection-fatality rate for New York City based on its massive outbreak from March 1 to May 16.
  • In an informal analysis published on Medium, Meyerowitz-Katz compared the infection-fatality rates from influenza to several calculated around the world so far for COVID-19.
  • Using the handful of studies that have calculated infection-fatality rates for seasonal flu, Meyerowitz-Katz determined that somewhere between 1 and 10 people die for every 100,000 that are infected.

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A wake-up call for the American dream

  • New York (CNN Business) - This fourth of July, nationwide protests and the Covid-19 crisis have forced America to recognize the ugly inequality lying just beneath its star-spangled surface.
  • The country's economic fragility is clear: Almost 40% of Americans were unable to cover a $400 emergency expense and quickly pay it off, according to the Federal Reserve.
  • Middle-income families' share of American wealth has been cut nearly in half over the past four decades, to just 17%.
  • Close to half of the US workforce is employed in low-wage jobs with mean annual pay of under $20,000 a year.
  • 85% of Americans are employed by small- and middle-sized businesses, which have proven particularly vulnerable during the economic downturn.
  • Technological adoption and innovation in areas such as working at home have accelerated since March, and automation is perhaps now a bigger threat than it has ever been to low- and middle-income workers.

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Bracing for a second wave: the global shift to a 'new normal'

  • The story emerging from first-wave countries is enough to rekindle the fear and anxiety that the likes of Australia and Europe went through in March and April.
  • More than 5400 Swedes have died – 10 or more times the rate in other Nordic countries – and its infection rate has jumped to as many as 1000 a day now from 600 a day in May. That said, the deaths are largely in nursing homes and the infection rate probably reflects a much-increased testing program.
  • Germany has put 500,000 people in lockdown in Gütersloh following an outbreak largely confined to a single slaughterhouse and its worker housing blocks.
  • Journalist Toby Young, founder of Lockdownsceptics.org, says that if Leicester is averaging 472 new cases a week, then on a fatality rate of 0.25 per cent this means one death a week.

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Mortgage rates hit (another) all-time low

  • The average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell to a record low of 3.07% this past week, according to Freddie Mac. That's the lowest level in the nearly 50 years of the mortgage giant's survey.
  • The 15-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped to 2.56%.
  • The average rate for a 30 year-fixed mortgage dropped below the previous record low of 3.13% that was set in June and marks the fifth new low since March.
  • The data suggests the recent rebound in economic activity has come to a halt over the last couple of weeks, with some declines in consumer spending and a pullback in purchase activity, according to Freddie Mac. Even with rates moving toward the 3% mark, lenders maintained tight underwriting standards which contributed to a decline in mortgage applications for the second consecutive week, he said.

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ASX futures higher, Wall St gains on jobs beat

  • Nonfarm payrolls surged by 4.8 million jobs in June, the largest gain since the government started keeping records in 1939.
  • Washington | America's labour market roared to life last month on a record 4.8 million new jobs, but many investors and analysts fear the rebound out of the worst unemployment rate since the Great Depression is threatened by fresh virus outbreaks.
  • President Donald Trump leapt on the consensus-beating surge that cut the jobless rate from 13.3 per cent in May to 11.1 per cent in June, warning that if he loses the November election to Joe Biden the country could face a "1929 situation", which saw global stock markets collapse and start the last worldwide depression.
  • Investors should favour stocks and gold over bonds and cash because the latter offer a negative rate of return, the hedge fund founder said.

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Dow Booms as Wall Street Defies Ray Dalio's Free Market Death-Knell

  • A better than expected jobs report helped send the Dow Jones pumping higher on Thursday.
  • Stock market bulls cheered the strong non-farm payrolls report, especially the sharp drop in the unemployment rate.
  • The jobs report predates a second wave of lockdowns across the United States.
  • ING economist James Knightley had warned that the June jobs report could paint an inaccurate picture of the U.S. economy.
  • Another big upside surprise for payrolls of 4.8mn while the unemployment rate plunges to 11.1%.
  • Moreover, with states dialling back on re-openings the July jobs report could be far more sobering.
  • With states like Arizona, Florida, and Texas all finally bearing the brunt of the pandemic, it’s surprising to see the Dow so buoyant.
  • Reversing the reopenings didn’t spook Apple bulls, as the tech giant continued its steady grind towards a $2 trillion market cap.

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Racial inequalities in COVID-19 — the impact on black communities

  • As the pandemic persists and more data become available, MNT will continue to address the broader issue and focus on the impact that COVID-19 is having on specific racial and ethnic groups.
  • For instance, sex-disaggregated data was not publicly available in the U.S. in mid-April 2020, when the country had the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the world.Similarly, it took the federal government 3 months to start tracking COVID-19 deaths and infections in nursing homes, and even then the efforts were incomplete, despite outcry from researchers and public health experts.
  • Reports from disparate U.S. states, coupled with emerging studies, are all painting a worrying picture: Black Americans are being hit the hardest by the pandemic, along with Latinx communities, while Indigenous populations and other minority communities are also taking the brunt of COVID-19 in some states.

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June jobs report: US economy adds 4.8 million jobs, unemployment 11.1% - Business Insider

  • The US economy notched its second straight month of job additions in June amid nationwide efforts to claw back from a coronavirus-induced recession.
  • That exceeded the 3 million payroll additions expected by economists surveyed by Bloomberg.
  • Meanwhile, the US unemployment rate came in at 11.1%, lower than the 12.5% expected by economists.
  • Still, in the last two weeks not covered by the report, surging new coronavirus cases have cast doubt on the path of the recovery.
  • Economists and industry watchers will have to wait for the July report, due in August, to see the employment impact of new coronavirus cases.
  • The June numbers come after May's report shocked economists, showing 2.5 million job additions at a time when they were expecting a contraction of 7.5 million jobs.
  • This is a breaking story.
  • Please email [email protected] and tell us your story.

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June jobs report: US economy adds 4.8 million jobs, unemployment 11.1% - Business Insider

  • The US economy notched its second straight month of job additions in June amid nationwide efforts to claw back from a coronavirus-induced recession.
  • That exceeded the 3 million payroll additions expected by economists surveyed by Bloomberg.
  • Meanwhile, the US unemployment rate came in at 11.1%, lower than the 12.5% expected by economists.
  • Still, in the last two weeks not covered by the report, surging new coronavirus cases have cast doubt on the path of the recovery.
  • Economists and industry watchers will have to wait for the July report, due in August, to see the employment impact of new coronavirus cases.
  • The June numbers come after May's report shocked economists, showing 2.5 million job additions at a time when they were expecting a contraction of 7.5 million jobs.
  • This is a breaking story.
  • Please email [email protected] and tell us your story.

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How to keep your mortgage costs low

  • Property buyers with a $500,000 fixed-rate mortgage could be paying $460 a month more than expected by failing to take into account all the "small print" fees and charges imposed by lenders.
  • Savvy property buyers should be able to use the information to get an even better deal as fixed rates continue being slashed to record lows and discounts of up to 200 basis points are being offered on standard variable loans.
  • Buyers attracted by cheap advertised rates, both for fixed and variable loans, need to check on the small print comparison rates to make sure they are not paying thousands of dollars a year extra in upfront and annual fees.
  • Some of the "headline" rates being offered to borrowers are more than 170 basis points lower than the comparison rate, which includes all the additional fees and charges for setting up and administering the loan, says Canstar.

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