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Articles related to "report"


ASX jumps as Afterpay soars 9.5pc to lead tech sector gains

  • Australian shares shot higher on Thursday, with Afterpay surging to a new record high and other tech stocks jumping as well, as the sector took a lead from a strong performance in the US tech sector.
  • In Australian trading, Afterpay shares shot up 9.5 per cent to $68.16, a new high.
  • The local coal sector rose on reports that Japan was planning to retire 90 per cent of its older coal-fired power plans in the next decade, with Whitehaven Coal gaining 4.5 per cent to close at $1.50.
  • Kathmandu soared 9.3 per cent to $1.17 after reporting same-store sales for the six weeks ended June 28 rose 21 per cent in its Ripcurl stores and 12.5 per cent at its Kathmandu stores, with strong contributions from online.
  • Australian shares are set to open higher, bolstered by further gains on Wall Street.

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State-backed COVID-19 disinfo spreads faster and farther than local news outlets in 4 languages

  • Questionable stories on COVID-19 from state-backed outlets in Russia, China, Turkey and Iran are being shared more widely than reporting by major news organizations around the world, according to Oxford analysts.
  • The group found that major outlets like Le Monde, Der Spiegel, and El Pais are being out-shared four or five to one in some metrics by content from Russia Today, China Radio International, and other state-backed organizations.
  • That sort of clickbait spreads like wildfire on social media, of course, and few of those who thoughtlessly hit that share button will have the inclination to check whether the source is a government-backed news agency plainly attempting to sow discord.
  • The countries and state-backed outlets mentioned also have a major presence in Arabic-language markets and the researchers are working on a follow-up study inclusive of those.

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Google is still paying Apple billions to be the default search engine in Safari

  • UK regulators are scrutinizing a longstanding deal between Apple and Google over the default search engine in the iPhone maker’s mobile Safari browser, reports Reuters.
  • According to an updated report compiled by the UK government’s Competition and Markets Authority, Google pays Apple a “substantial majority” of the £1.2 billion (roughly $1.5 billion) it pays every year in the UK alone for so-called default positions, in other words when Google pays a company to make its search engine the go-to one in a browser or other platform.
  • For years, mobile Safari has relied on Google search, making the iPhone a substantial revenue-generator for Google’s mobile ad business and giving it a competitive edge over the competition.
  • In 2019, Google paid around £1.2 billion in return for default positions in the UK alone, the substantial majority of which was paid to Apple for being the default on the Safari browser.

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Sweeping climate-crisis plan would bring US to zero emissions in 30 years

  • In addition to requiring stricter fuel efficiency from vehicles using internal combustion engines, the report calls for Congress to establish a technology-neutral standard requiring all new light-duty vehicles sold to be zero-emissions vehicles by 2035—only 15 years from now.
  • To that end, Congress should funding for and access to a federal weatherization fund that would assist low- and moderate-income Americans increase the energy efficiency of their homes, the report suggests.
  • In order to alleviate that crisis and permit for density, the report suggests expanding a low-income housing tax credit to encourage denser building in city centers and increase the supply of housing to help meet demand.
  • Results of a survey released last week by the Pew Research Center find broad, bipartisan support from the public for increased federal activity around the climate crisis.

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Novel coronavirus: What we know so far

  • To date, the novel coronavirus — called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) — has been responsible for millions of infections globally, causing hundreds of thousands of deaths.
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), some recent studies suggest that people may still spread COVID-19 if they are not showing symptoms.
  • Recently, a study by researchers in China suggested that pangolins may have been the initial propagators of SARS-CoV-2 among humans, as its genomic sequence appears to be 99% like that of a coronavirus specific to these animals.
  • The CDC report that the groups most at risk of experiencing severe illness due to SARS-CoV-2 are adults aged 65 or older and individuals of any age who have other health conditions that compromise their immune systems.
  • Official WHO prevention guidelines suggest that in order to avoid contracting the new coronavirus, people should use personal hygiene practices that can keep any virus at bay.

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Gun violence surges in major American cities in the midst of a pandemic and a policing crisis

  • The increase in gun violence comes at a time when them heat is rising — literally and figuratively — on the streets, as cities reopen during a pandemic and mass anti-police brutality protests have led to law enforcement reforms and budget cuts.
  • Christopher Herrmann, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a former NYPD analyst who focused on gun violence, said the week to week increases in New York shootings and homicides were unprecedented.
  • Hermann said the numbers were due to people starting to emerge after months of coronavirus stay-at-home orders plus the warmer weather, when gun violence in larger cities tends to jump up to 30%.
  • In New York, a group of people hurled glass bottles and debris at NYPD vehicles early Sunday after police responded to devices known as "shot spotters" that detect the sound of gunshots and alert 911 dispatchers.

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Members of Congress want to know more about law enforcement’s surveillance of protesters

  • In a Tuesday letter sent to leaders at several federal agencies, including Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the FBI, officials demanded that those agencies “cease any and all surveilling of Americans engaged in peaceful protests.” They pointed to several instances in which the press has documented federal agencies using concerning surveillance tactics in major American cities, pointing to aircraft that flew over Washington, DC, and temporarily expanded authority granted to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to conduct surveillance over protesters.
  • But the letter sent from Congress to DHS in June seeks more context, and lawmakers have requested a complete list of jurisdictions where DHS conducted or helped in the surveillance of protests, information about what DHS plans to do with the data collects about protesters, and details about whether any local police departments are working with facial recognition.
  • Just a year later, the ACLU released a report detailing how companies, including Facebook and Twitter, provided social media data for a surveillance product that was marketed to law enforcement agencies as a way to track activists and protesters.

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What fuels systemic racism in the fashion industry - Business Insider

  • On June 1, L'Oréal Paris posted on Instagram a black square with white text that read, "Speaking out is worth it." The brand, like countless others, expressed solidarity with the Black community amid widespread protests calling for police reform in the wake of the killing of George Floyd.
  • Former Refinery29 beauty writer Khalea Underwood wrote for Business Insider that she wasn't given the same opportunities as white reporters, making her believe she was "merely a diversity hire." The site's cofounder and editor in chief, Christene Barberich, resigned.
  • Current and former employees at fashion brand Reformation told Business Insider they experienced microaggressions and racist behavior because of a culture driven by CEO and founder Yael Aflalo, who resigned in June.
  • Business Insider pored over reports of these allegations and spoke with fashion historians and critics to learn why systemic racism seems to run so rampant in the industry.

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What fuels systemic racism in the fashion industry - Business Insider

  • On June 1, L'Oréal Paris posted on Instagram a black square with white text that read, "Speaking out is worth it." The brand, like countless others, expressed solidarity with the Black community amid widespread protests calling for police reform in the wake of the killing of George Floyd.
  • Former Refinery29 beauty writer Khalea Underwood wrote for Business Insider that she wasn't given the same opportunities as white reporters, making her believe she was "merely a diversity hire." The site's cofounder and editor in chief, Christene Barberich, resigned.
  • Current and former employees at fashion brand Reformation told Business Insider they experienced microaggressions and racist behavior because of a culture driven by CEO and founder Yael Aflalo, who resigned in June.
  • Business Insider pored over reports of these allegations and spoke with fashion historians and critics to learn why systemic racism seems to run so rampant in the industry.

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Spies, Lies, and Stonewalling: What It’s Like to Report on Facebook

  • (Some journalists, like The Observer’s Carole Cadwalladr, have done important work linking Facebook data to political corruption in the UK and elsewhere.) Media organizations have stepped up their game, but they suffer from a lack of access, among other power asymmetries.
  • Covering the company soon became a full-time job for some tech journalists, especially at digital publications like TechCrunch or Gizmodo that expected writers to generate a stream of news and scoops.
  • In those years, scandals involving the company were mostly low-grade stuff: users unhappy about design changes; public disputes between the founders (as dramatized in The Social Network); murky data collection practices that caused the FTC to force Facebook to sign a “consent decree” in 2011.
  • Taylor Lorenz, a New York Times Style reporter, told me that last year she attended an off-the-record dinner sponsored by Instagram.

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