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Articles related to "said"


New Jersey dismissing cyber-harassment case over tweeting cop’s photo

  • The Nutley Police Department filed a criminal complaint in July against protester Kevin Alfaro, who tweeted a photograph of Detective Peter Sandomenico during a Nutley For Black Lives demonstration in June.
  • Alfaro’s tweet asked “if anyone knows who this bitch is throw his info under this tweet,” something Sandomenico said caused him to fear for the safety of his family.
  • The department also charged four people who retweeted the tweet, including Georgana Sziszak, who publicized the case in a GoFundMe campaign.
  • Civil liberties advocates said the case had little justification and that a prosecutor was unlikely to pursue it, but it alarmed critics who viewed it as a police intimidation tactic.
  • It’s also part of a pattern of aggressive legal charges against Black Lives Matter protesters nationwide — like a Utah criminal mischief case that sees demonstrators facing a life sentence for splashing paint and smashing windows.

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Silicon Valley's answer to the NASDAQ has been in tests since Monday - Business Insider

  • The Long-Term Stock Exchange (LTSE), an ambitious attempt to compete with heavyweight exchanges like the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq, said Friday it has appointed a board of directors and started real-time tests of its digital trading mechanism on Monday.
  • But though the startup stock exchange received Securities and Exchange Commission approval last year, and it's  funded by prominent investors, its founder says it may take until 2021 before the first company makes its debut as a publicly traded company on the LTSE.
  • Ries said companies could start listing on the LTSE as soon as this year, though he "wouldn't bet on that" because of how tricky it is to convince companies to sign up for a new exchange.
  • The LTSE's timeline is in flux due to the virus, Ries said, making him unsure how long the testing phase will last and when companies will start listing on it for real.

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Silicon Valley's answer to the NASDAQ has been in tests since Monday - Business Insider

  • The Long-Term Stock Exchange (LTSE), an ambitious attempt to compete with heavyweight exchanges like the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq, said Friday it has appointed a board of directors and started real-time tests of its digital trading mechanism on Monday.
  • But though the startup stock exchange received Securities and Exchange Commission approval last year, and it's  funded by prominent investors, its founder says it may take until 2021 before the first company makes its debut as a publicly traded company on the LTSE.
  • Ries said companies could start listing on the LTSE as soon as this year, though he "wouldn't bet on that" because of how tricky it is to convince companies to sign up for a new exchange.
  • The LTSE's timeline is in flux due to the virus, Ries said, making him unsure how long the testing phase will last and when companies will start listing on it for real.

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Intel Is Investigating How Confidential Data Ended Up Online

  • Intel is investigating the purported leak of more than 20 gigabytes of its proprietary data and source code that a security researcher said came from a data breach earlier this year.
  • Kottmann said they obtained the data from a source who breached Intel earlier this year and that today's installment would be followed by others in the future.
  • It’s not clear if the failures apply to actual hardware delivered to customers or if they’re happening on reference boards Intel provided to OEMs for use in designing their own boards.
  • While Intel said it doesn’t believe the documents were obtained through a network breach, a screenshot of the conversation Kottmann had with the source provided an alternate explanation.

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Inside the federal prison where three out of every four inmates have tested positive for coronavirus

  • In Ohio, a judge ordered officials to release or transfer more than 800 vulnerable inmates at another federal prison ravaged by the virus, saying the conditions in the facility had possibly reached the level of "cruel and unusual punishment." But an appeals court struck down that order in June, finding that the inmates did not prove the BOP was "deliberately indifferent" to the risks presented by Covid-19.
  • Curtis Severns, a Seagoville inmate scheduled to be released next year after an arson conviction based on disputed evidence, said that he and other inmates faced a four-day delay between taking a test and getting the result last month -- which meant that the prison didn't move some positive inmates out of the general population until it was too late.

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Salmonella outbreak linked to onions expands to hundreds of people sickened in 43 states

  • Some of the onions were sold at stores including Walmart, Kroger, Fred Meyer, Publix, Giant Eagle, Food Lion, and H-E-B, under a variety of brand names, the CDC said.
  • Several companies have recalled onions and foods made with recalled onions like chicken salad, macaroni salad, fajita stir-fry, pizza and diced raw onions, including Taylor Farms and Giant Eagle.
  • The CDC said people should check their homes for the recalled products and throw away the affected items.
  • Signs of salmonella infection include diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps between six hours and six days after exposure to the bacteria.
  • Infections have been reported in several states including Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Illinois, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

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Trump steps back from involving himself in Libya's bloody civil war

  • Recent pleas by the leaders of Turkey, Egypt and others for Trump to get involved in the conflict have fallen on deaf ears, several foreign and US officials tell CNN.
  • The Trump White House had taken an active interest in the conflict in 2019, reaching out to Gen. Khalifa Haftar, the warlord leading an offensive against the country's United Nations-backed government.
  • Secretary of State Mike Pompeo took part this year in a Libya summit hosted in Berlin, where countries including France, Russia and Turkey laid out a cease-fire plan, which ultimately failed, and called for an end to violence despite their own surreptitious support to the warring factions.
  • Under former national security adviser John Bolton, the leaders of Saudi Arabia and Egypt successfully lobbied Trump to shift US policy in Libya and reach out to Haftar, a senior US administration official and two Saudi officials said.

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Riders begin to gather in South Dakota for 80th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

  • The celebration -- which nearly 500,000 people attended last year -- will take place as the coronavirus pandemic remains out of control in cities across the country and health experts warn against large gatherings that help fuel the spread.
  • The hospital system is also prepared to offer 1,300 Covid-19 tests to anyone who is asymptomatic but concerned about the disease after the rally ends, Schulte said.
  • He said he worries about any large gathering, no matter what the reason, during a pandemic, but especially the motorcycle rally because it attracts people from all over the country.
  • South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem says that to hold events like the rally, people should be given information that lets them protect their health, but still enjoy their way of life.

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Attorneys for former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger file appeal in Botham Jean murder case

  • Guyger was convicted of murder last October and is serving a 10-year prison sentence.
  • Jean was on the couch, watching TV and eating ice cream when Guyger walked in and shot him, prosecutors said.
  • Botham Jean's family issued a statement expressing their disappointment on hearing of Guyger's appeal.
  • On the final day of the murder trial Jean's younger brother, Brandt, told Guyger during his victim impact statement that he forgave her, and gave her a long hug before she was taken to prison.
  • Merritt went on to say the appeal alleges Guyger "should have been allowed to murder Botham in 'self defense'" because she thought she was inside her own apartment.
  • But, "the jury was instructed on self defense prior to deliberations and they properly rejected the defense and found Guyger guilty of murder one," Merritt said.

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Japan's coronavirus fatigue is fueling defiance in Tokyo, even as the case count rises

  • Authorities in Tokyo are convinced that many of the city's infections are happening when people go out at night, so they have requested restaurants and bars that serve alcohol to close at 10 p.m. to mitigate the risk of contracting the virus indoors.
  • Those in the hospitality industry now face a tough choice: buck the government's 10 p.m. closure request to stay alive -- a potential health risk to customers and staff -- or follow the official advice and eat the loss in sales, even if it proves fatal to the business.
  • Hasegawa said the pandemic has been a "catastrophe" for his business, which only survived because it was in good enough shape to receive a government loan to stay afloat.
  • Like many other business owners, Hasegawa said he has applied to several loan programs that state-affiliated and private financial institutions offered as part of the government's economic relief package.

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