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Articles related to "said"


Tech companies are seizing the market moment

  • Not alone: Delivery app DoorDash said earlier this week that its IPO could raise $2.54 billion if it prices shares at $80, the midpoint of its expected range.
  • Salesforce, which sells cloud-based customer management software and other enterprise applications, said its acquisition of Slack, announced Tuesday, will help to bolster its business offerings at a crucial time.
  • Sinch, a Swedish cloud and telecommunications company, said this week that SoftBank had acquired a 10% stake in the firm, which is the best performing stock in Europe this year.
  • Details, details: The exchange is proposing a rule that would require companies to have at least two "diverse" directors, including one woman and one member of an underrepresented minority group, my CNN Business colleague Chris Isidore reports.

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What’s really going on with the mail-in ballots the US Postal Service can’t trace

  • US District Judge Emmet Sullivan in Washington, DC, had imposed a 3 pm deadline earlier on Tuesday as part of a lawsuit filed by plaintiffs including the NAACP against the USPS and Postmaster General DeJoy. The suit alleges DeJoy “impeded the timely distribution of mail, implemented crippling policies on postal workers, and sabotaged the United States Postal Service in a blatant attempt to disenfranchise voters of color.” The deadline was also in response to a USPS court filing from Monday indicating that just over 300,000 mail-in ballots nationwide had been scanned upon receipt at mail-processing plants but that there were no records indicating these ballots had been delivered.
  • Lawyers for the USPS said in a court filing on Wednesday that postal workers were instructed to run continuous sweeps of their facilities on Election Day and get ballots to their destination by a state’s cutoff time.

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Here's when coronavirus vaccines will be rolled out: Goldman Sachs - Business Insider

  • Goldman Sachs has laid out a timeline for when coronavirus vaccines will be rolled out in advanced economies.
  • The bank's predicted timing is based on a combination of supply estimates — from vaccine developers Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, AstraZeneca-Oxford, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson — and demand (using consumer surveys).
  • More than 70% of people in developed markets may have received a vaccine shot by the second quarter of 2021, according to Goldman's timeline.
  • On Monday, the UK became the first country to approve Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine shot, marking a major relief for economies and travel-dependent sectors around the world.
  • Economists Daan Struyven and Sid Bhushan said they expect the first available doses in the US to go to high-risk groups from mid-December.
  • Goldman Sachs predicted that the US FDA will approve Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna's vaccines in the coming weeks.

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The UK has approved a COVID-19 vaccine, but the US is still waiting. Here's why. - Business Insider

  • The FDA and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the UK regulator, have different processes to review vaccines, Dr Penny Ward, a visiting professor in pharmaceutical medicine at King's College London, told The New York Times.
  • On Tuesday, Mark Meadows, chief of staff at the White House, asked FDA commissioner Stephen Hahn why he hasn't moved faster to approve Pfizer's vaccine, two senior administration officials told Axios.
  • Wednesday's announcement followed "the most rigorous scientific assessment of every piece of data" to meet safety, effectiveness, and quality standards, MHRA CEO Dr June Raine said at a press conference.
  • The MHRA reviewed data from the laboratory pre-clinical studies, clinical trials, manufacturing and quality controls, product sampling, and testing of the final vaccine, the UK government said.

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Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine: Why the US behind UK in approval - Business Insider

  • The FDA and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the UK regulator, have different processes to review vaccines, Dr Penny Ward, a visiting professor in pharmaceutical medicine at King's College London, told The New York Times.
  • On Tuesday, Mark Meadows, chief of staff at the White House, asked FDA commissioner Stephen Hahn why he hasn't moved faster to approve Pfizer's vaccine, two senior administration officials told Axios.
  • Wednesday's announcement followed "the most rigorous scientific assessment of every piece of data" to meet safety, effectiveness, and quality standards, MHRA CEO Dr June Raine said at a press conference.
  • The MHRA reviewed data from the laboratory pre-clinical studies, clinical trials, manufacturing and quality controls, product sampling, and testing of the final vaccine, the UK government said.

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Choose anti-inflammatory foods to lower heart disease and stroke risk

  • Eating red meat and highly processed foods, however, contributes to chronic inflammation in the body, increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
  • The study, which followed nearly 166,000 women and 44,000 men for 24 to 30 years, found those who ate higher levels of red and processed meats like bacon and sausage and sugary, processed foods had a 28% higher risk of stroke and a 46% higher risk of heart disease.
  • While the exact biological ways foods impact inflammatory pathways is not yet fully understood, researchers believe sugary, processed foods in the Western diet, along with pollution, cigarette smoke, radiation and medications, may lead to the increased activation of free radicals in the body.
  • Unfortunately, today's Western diet is full of overly processed, fat-laden foods, sugary drinks and red and processed meats that can cause persistently high levels inflammation in the body.

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China’s Covid-19 Comeback Lifts Iron Ore

  • SYDNEY—Even as steel production in the West stumbles because of the coronavirus pandemic, iron-ore prices are surging again as steelmakers in China keep output high to support the economic recovery there.
  • Iron ore climbed to $133.05 a metric ton on Tuesday, notching up its strongest price in seven years, according to data from S&P; Global Platts.
  • The China Iron and Steel Association recently forecast China’s annual crude-steel output will top 1 billion tons in 2020, representing growth of up to 5% on year.
  • Fixed-asset investment—which includes manufacturing, property and infrastructure investment, all big steel-using sectors—is rising and a gauge of China’s factory activity climbed to a three-year peak in November, new data showed Monday.
  • The boom in prices for materials including iron ore gives Australia’s economic recovery an advantage compared with the rest of the world, said Paul Xiradis, chief investment officer and head of equities at investment fund Ausbil.

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Covid-19 news: Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine authorised for use in the UK

  • The UK Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) has given authorisation for emergency use for the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine.
  • The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has delayed its assessment of coronavirus vaccines being developed by US pharmaceutical company Pfizer in partnership with German biotechnology company BioNTech and by US pharmaceutical company Moderna for emergency regulatory approval.
  • The UK has no plans to introduce so-called “vaccine passports” to allow people who have been vaccinated against the coronavirus to access places such as pubs and restaurants once a vaccine becomes widely available, UK cabinet office minister Michael Gove said today.
  • Pfizer and BioNTech released promising complete results from their phase III coronavirus vaccine trial on 18 November, showing 95 per cent efficacy, and requested emergency use authorisation from the US Food and Drug Administration shortly afterwards.

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Albanese accuses PM of offending China 'for offence sake'

  • Labor leader Anthony Albanese has sharpened criticism of Scott Morrison's handling of the China relationship, suggesting he is unnecessarily causing offence, as the US and British governments both condemned Beijing over its smear of Australian soldiers.
  • The Chinese Foreign Ministry's sharing of a digitally created image of an Australian soldier slitting the throat of an Afghan boy to highlight alleged war crimes committed by special forces soldiers has sent the bilateral relationship to rock bottom on top of trade and political tensions.
  • Mr Albanese said while the Chinese ministry's tweet was offensive, he called on Mr Morrison to do better at managing the relationship.
  • Reserve Bank of Australia governor Philip Lowe said on Wednesday the economic "consequences" of the "strained" Australia-China relationship would depend on whether the tensions continued or relations were repaired.

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UK approves Pfizer and BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, first in West - Business Insider

  • The country's regulatory body, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), gave its approval to the vaccine developed by US drugmaker Pfizer and the small German firm BioNTech.
  • It said: "The Government has today accepted the recommendation from the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to approve Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine for use.
  • The MHRA said that Pfizer's vaccine protects against COVID-19 — the disease caused by coronavirus — and is safe, after it reviewed all the vaccine's data including from a large, late-stage clinical trial of 43,661 volunteers.
  • Pfizer's vaccine is a new mRNA technology that uses genetic material to stimulate the immune system to protect against coronavirus infection.
  • The regulatory approval in the UK marks a milestone for Pfizer, but also for other vaccine-makers, like Moderna, that use mRNA technology too.

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