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Articles related to "says"


China introduces ‘social’ punishments for scientific misconduct

  • Under the new policy, dozens of government agencies will have the power to hand out penalties to those caught committing major scientific misconduct, a role previously performed by the science ministry or universities.
  • Although some penalties for misconduct existed before the new policy — research programmes can be suspended; offenders can be barred from promotions — drawing them together under one framework makes them much more powerful, says Yang Wei, the former head of the National Science Foundation of China who is now a researcher at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou.
  • “It shows that China takes research integrity very seriously,” says Max Lu, a chemical engineer and president of the University of Surrey in Guildford, UK, , who has previously advised the Chinese government on science policy.

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China introduces ‘social’ punishments for scientific misconduct

  • Under the new policy, dozens of government agencies will have the power to hand out penalties to those caught committing major scientific misconduct, a role previously performed by the science ministry or universities.
  • Although some penalties for misconduct existed before the new policy — research programmes can be suspended; offenders can be barred from promotions — drawing them together under one framework makes them much more powerful, says Yang Wei, the former head of the National Science Foundation of China who is now a researcher at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou.
  • “It shows that China takes research integrity very seriously,” says Max Lu, a chemical engineer and president of the University of Surrey in Guildford, UK, , who has previously advised the Chinese government on science policy.

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22 predictions for social media in 2019

  • Dave Smith says “Apple or Google will try some sort of social network again.” We know former Facebook wunderkind Michael Sayman is cooking up some sort of social app at Google, so consider this prediction endorsed.
  • Kevin Middleton says Twitter will get pulled from the App Store over adult content — a prediction that seems surprisingly likely after the Tumblr fiasco this year.
  • For an idea of what this might look like, check out Shane Dawson’s docu-series on the notorious failed YouTube conference TanaCon. No one, for what it’s worth, predicted that YouTube would get its right-wing extremism problem under control.
  • Constine describes the data in question “photos users uploaded but either decided not to post, that got interrupted by connectivity issues, or that they otherwise never finished sharing.” When I think of my own photos that fit that description, it’s a lot of dumb selfies, blurry low-light shots, and other camera-roll clutter.

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Baby gene edits could affect a range of traits

  • He, a genome-editing researcher at the Southern University of Science and Technology of China in Shenzhen, says in several YouTube videos that he impregnated a woman with embryos that had been edited to disable a gene that allows HIV to infect cells.
  • He targeted this gene, known as CCR5, because it is well studied, and because its mutation offers protection against HIV infection, which still carries a significant social stigma in China.
  • Although the CCR5-Δ32 mutation disables the gene and makes carriers resistant to the dominant strain of HIV, over the past two decades dozens of studies have shown that CCR5 also helps to protect the lungs, liver and brain during some other serious infections and chronic diseases.
  • Murphy says that the twin with one copy of the gene should be protected from these severe effects if she contracts the virus, but the other twin probably has a higher risk of complications if infected.

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Check your fridge and pantry for food products recalled this week

  • CTI Foods LLC, is recalling 29,028 pounds of frozen, ready-to-eat poultry and pork sausage links after five people called the US Food Safety and Inspection Service to let them know they had found metal pieces in the sausage, according to the US Department of Agriculture.
  • The agencies are continuing to investigate other possible sources, and the CDC still advises consumers not to eat romaine lettuce grown in California's Monterey, San Benito and Santa Barbara counties until investigations are complete.
  • The company recalled its organic sunflower butter because of the potential contamination of Listeria monocytogenes, an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems, the FDA said.
  • The recalled product is sold in 16-ounce packages and can be identified by the "best by" date of October 2019, the lot number 99 and the UPC number 863669742526.

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The beef with beef

  • Global consumption of beef and veal is set to rise in the next decade according to projections from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO).
  • He says the number of flexitarians -- people who eat a largely vegetarian diet with occasional meat or fish -- in Hong Kong has "risen dramatically over the last six years," fueled by rising awareness in dietary health, sustainability, and availability of plant-based options in restaurants.
  • According to a 2013 FAO report, Sub-Saharan cattle produce the second highest amount of methane per kilogram of meat, while according to mapping by the World Resources Institute (WRI) the region has a higher distribution of extremely inefficient beef production systems than anywhere else.

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The S&P 500 and Dow are back in a correction. Here's what experts are watching for next week

  • The downturn has put more than half of S&P 500 stocks in a bear market, which means they are down more than 20 percent off their recent respective highs, and has put the index on track for its worst quarter since 2011.
  • Slowing economic growth, trade war fears and a Fed meeting will be at the top of investors' minds next week.
  • Portfolio manager Alessio de Longis says that even though global markets are generally slowing, 2019 could be a strong year for emerging markets if there is more consistently positive news on trade.
  • Chief investment strategist Sam Stovall sees a slowdown in the future, but thinks those fearing a recession need to pump the breaks.
  • "The key is, this is simply going to be a slowdown because the bar has been set so high," says Stovall.

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Bitcoin Price Will Soar over Next Three Years: Circle CEO Jeremy Allaire

  • The bitcoin price will rocket over the next three years, and cryptocurrency valuations will spike accordingly, says Jeremy Allaire, the co-founder and CEO of Circle, a peer-to-peer payments technology company backed by Goldman Sachs.
  • When asked what will bring people who lost money in the current bear market back to the table, Allaire said it’s because the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies haven’t changed simply because their prices cratered.
  • Allaire said some virtual currencies would die off in an overcrowded market due to competitive forces, but it’s not a zero-sum game where the success of one digital currency means the death of all the others.
  • As CCN reported, Mike Novogratz — the founder of crypto investment bank Galaxy Digital — extolled the tokenization of real estate, saying asset tokenization is an emerging trend.
  • When asked when regulation will happen in the crypto industry, Circle CEO Jeremy Allaire said digital assets have actually been regulated for some time.

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Concentric CEO: Connect With Society at All Levels of Business

  • “We see people as part of the system, and we express values of science, efficiency, and quality to all customers,” says Greg Silverman, CEO of market analytics software company Concentric.
  • “[By understanding customer behavior], our software helps companies participate in the things that go beyond their profit objective,” Silverman says.
  • For Concentric, which gathers lots of data by the hour, trust is a critical component of customer relationships.
  • To establish trust, the company operates privacy controls to keep data secure and confidential.
  • Silverman tells Fortune that Concentric set boundaries around data flows as one measure to help prevent a system breach.
  • “The key to our system is that companies operate behind a firewall [a secure barrier between a trusted internal network and an untrusted external network]…we’re not ingesting anyone’s data, so we’re slightly insulated,” he says.

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Banks and lenders are sending out pre-approved checks in the mail that seem like free cash, but there's a huge catch

  • Such pre-screened mail offers, or "live checks," are personal loans sent from banks or lenders to consumers who meet certain criteria, like a minimum credit score.
  • Cashing the check enters you into a loan agreement that may last multiple years and have an annual interest rate above 25%.
  • Chris Jackson received a live check in the mail last November for $2,500 with a 28% interest rate.
  • Live checks sometimes have optional add-ons that effectively increase the total cost.David Lienemann/Getty Images"Pushing credit on people when they haven't actually asked for it can easily lead them to being overextended," Carter says.
  • Cashing the check enters you into a loan agreement that may last multiple years and have an annual interest rate above 25%.Flickr / PeteIf you think the live check is a scam, you can report it to the Federal Trade Commission .
  • Compare personal loan rates and terms at credit unions, banks, and online lenders.

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