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Articles related to "scientists"


Amazon is adding 30,000 jobs and holding hiring events today — here's where to find them

  • Amazon is adding 30,000 jobs and planning to hold a career day on Tuesday to help fill the roles.
  • The openings include roles at the company's headquarters, tech hubs, data centers, retail stores, and fulfillment centers, where Amazon workers pick and pack customer orders, Amazon said.
  • Positions include "entry-level roles at Amazon's fulfillment centers working with the latest robotics technology, software development engineers helping make Alexa smarter, or computer vision scientists building the technology behind Amazon Go," the company said in a release.
  • Amazon's hiring events on Tuesday will take place in Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Nashville, Seattle, and Arlington, Virginia, which is the site of Amazon's second US headquarters.
  • Amazon recruiters will attend the events and provide more information on the roles available, the company said.

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What the Ctenophore says about the evolution of intelligence

  • Leonid Moroz has spent two decades trying to wrap his head around a mind-boggling idea: even as scientists start to look for alien life in other planets, there might already be aliens, with surprisingly different biology and brains, right here on Earth.
  • Moroz reached this conclusion by testing the nerve cells of ctenophores for the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and nitric oxide, chemical messengers considered the universal neural language of all animals.
  • By the 1990s, scientists had placed ctenophores low on the animal tree of life, on a branch next to cnidarians, the group that includes jellyfish, sea anemones and coral.
  • Below ctenophores and jellyfish on the evolutionary tree sat two other branches of animals that were clearly more primitive: placozoans and sea sponges, which both lacked nerve cells of any kind.

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DNA Data Storage: The Entirety of YouTube Could Fit on a Teaspoon

  • DNA data storage is about to get wild.
  • That's why it's so shocking that researchers have shown the theoretical possibility that they could store 10 petabytes (10 million gigabytes) of data in a single gram of DNA.
  • The study, from researchers at the Technion–Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa and the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, also in Israel, is meant to examine the possibility of DNA as data storage.
  • DNA already holds the intensely complex code for human life, which makes it potentially amazing for data storage.
  • Encoding information DNA requires a chain made up of links called nucleotides.
  • During a process known as synthesis, DNA molecules are produced representing these same sequences.
  • Given the intense complexity of this work, anything that makes it simpler and more efficient is a step in the right direction.
  • Scientists are also considering CRISPR techniques to make DNA more malleable to information storage.

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Could drinking tea boost brain connectivity?

  • Although there is no definitive evidence, some studies have identified certain associations between tea drinking and mental health.
  • Although the full range of functions of the DMN is not fully understood, some scientists believe it could play a role in brain aging and certain neurological conditions.
  • The current study also investigated what the researchers refer to as hemispheric asymmetry; by this, they mean that lines of communication between brain regions are not evenly spread out on either side of the brain.
  • The scientists chose to focus on this because, in earlier work, the same team concluded that asymmetry in connectivity might also be associated with brain aging.
  • Because the study is observational, it is not possible to rule out the possibility that other factors could be producing the differences in brain connectivity.
  • All in all, the studies that investigate the health benefits of tea are either observational or small scale.

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On Becoming Better Data Scientists

  • Gawande attributes success in medicine to 3 core qualities — diligence, doing right and ingenuity.
  • I believe that Data Scientists can take the learnings from Gawande’s book to accelerate and guarantee the field’s success.
  • I see parallels between the story of polio eradication in India and what Data Scientists are expected to accomplish at their work.
  • I share two stories on why ‘doing right’ is of utmost importance in the field of Data Science.
  • However, while learning explicit task-related human behaviors, the tools also learn implicit biases present in the historical data.
  • Andrew’s strategy was to get momentum for the new technology by finding projects that were meaningful but not the most important ones for the company.
  • I truly believe that data scientists can take the learnings from Gawande’s book to accelerate and guarantee the field’s success.

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On Becoming Better Data Scientists

  • Gawande attributes success in medicine to 3 core qualities — diligence, doing right and ingenuity.
  • I believe that Data Scientists can take the learnings from Gawande’s book to accelerate and guarantee the field’s success.
  • I see parallels between the story of polio eradication in India and what Data Scientists are expected to accomplish at their work.
  • I share two stories on why ‘doing right’ is of utmost importance in the field of Data Science.
  • However, while learning explicit task-related human behaviors, the tools also learn implicit biases present in the historical data.
  • Andrew’s strategy was to get momentum for the new technology by finding projects that were meaningful but not the most important ones for the company.
  • I truly believe that data scientists can take the learnings from Gawande’s book to accelerate and guarantee the field’s success.

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New electric eel species packs most powerful punch

  • These creatures use three electric organs to produce shocks, and these electrical discharges help them catch prey and ward off predators.
  • To investigate, a team of researchers examined 107 electric eel specimens from different regions of Greater Amazonia.
  • They compared DNA, the animals' overall form and structure (morphology), environmental data, and the power of their electric charge.
  • To investigate the electric eels' genetic makeup, the scientists sequenced and compared 10 mitochondrial and nuclear genes.
  • One of the new species produced the highest recorded voltage from an animal: 860 volts.
  • varii most commonly lives in lowland regions where the water has higher levels of dissolved salts and, therefore, conducts electricity more readily.
  • Santana, who has been shocked by electric eels more than once, explains that although the voltage can be high, the amperage is low — sometimes just 1 ampere (amp).

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A black hole in the centre of our galaxy is the 'hungriest it's been for 24 years' and is shining 75 times brighter than usual

  • A black hole at the center of our galaxy which is normally benign has been feasting on everything coming its way — a phenomenon scientists haven't observed in 24 years.
  • A few changes the scientists have observed previously was that the black hole shone 75 times brighter than usual on three separate days this year, according to Ghez.
  • Researchers from the UCLA Galactic Center Group looked at more than 13,000 angles of the Milky Way's black hole from the Keck Observatory in Hawaii and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile since 2003.
  • They suspect that it could be an unusual form of gas that's making the black hole react this way, but if this isn't the case, have also presented three possible explanations as to what could be causing these changes.
  • The other theory is that a set of binary stars called G2 could be the cause of the black hole's unusual appetite.

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