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Articles related to "statistics"


A Data Analysis of the Third Democratic Debate

  • In terms of data, the one piece of information that the news does cover is the speaking time.
  • On the right is the number of words spoken by each candidate during the September debate.
  • As expected, frontrunner Joe Biden got the largest number of words in during the debate.
  • Interestingly, Bernie Sanders, who got a good amount of time was near the bottom of the list in terms of words spoken.
  • In most polls, Yang is doing better than O’Rourke, Booker, Castro and Klobuchar.
  • When comparing a candidate’s speaking time to their polling, the biggest discrepancy observed was with Julian Castro.
  • Looking only at the number of times a candidate spoke (which includes short exchanges), we see that Castro did really well.
  • If we remove boring politician words like “will”, “must” and “American”, we can count the most common terms used by each candidate.

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A Data Analysis of the Third Democratic Debate

  • In terms of data, the one piece of information that the news does cover is the speaking time.
  • On the right is the number of words spoken by each candidate during the September debate.
  • As expected, frontrunner Joe Biden got the largest number of words in during the debate.
  • Interestingly, Bernie Sanders, who got a good amount of time was near the bottom of the list in terms of words spoken.
  • In most polls, Yang is doing better than O’Rourke, Booker, Castro and Klobuchar.
  • When comparing a candidate’s speaking time to their polling, the biggest discrepancy observed was with Julian Castro.
  • Looking only at the number of times a candidate spoke (which includes short exchanges), we see that Castro did really well.
  • If we remove boring politician words like “will”, “must” and “American”, we can count the most common terms used by each candidate.

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What Statistics Can and Can’t Tell Us About Ourselves

  • Harold Eddleston, a seventy-seven-year-old from Greater Manchester, was still reeling from a cancer diagnosis he had been given that week when, on a Saturday morning in February, 1998, he received the worst possible news.
  • David Spiegelhalter, the author of an important and comprehensive new book, “The Art of Statistics” (Basic), was one of the statisticians tasked by the ensuing public inquiry to establish whether the mortality rate of Shipman’s patients should have aroused suspicion earlier.
  • Then a biostatistician at Cambridge, Spiegelhalter found that Shipman’s excess mortality—the number of his older patients who had died in the course of his career over the number that would be expected of an average doctor’s—was a hundred and seventy-four women and forty-nine men at the time of his arrest.
  • At the time, the average life expectancy of French women was 74.5 years, and Raffray, then forty-seven, no doubt thought he’d negotiated himself an auspicious contract.

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