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Articles related to "technology"


Using Lidar to Add Autofocus to a Manual Focus Lens

  • DJI has a 3D focus accessory for the DJI RS 2 that allows you to autofocus any manual lens using LiDAR using what is called time of flight technology.
  • The technology has a few limitations like it won’t autofocus beyond 4m (22ft) because there aren’t enough photons bouncing back at that distance and the system has to be calibrated for each lens.
  • AF is handled completely independently of the camera and the lens is focused via gears so it will focus even with the camera off and since it uses LiDAR it will even focus in the dark.
  • DJI also makes an accessory to add gears to your manual focus lenses.
  • The 3D focus module isn’t available yet, but it will be in a few weeks for $169 and it requires the focus motors and RS2, but not the Ravens Eye wireless transmitter that was used in the video.

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An ed-tech specialist spoke out about remote testing software — and now he’s being sued

  • Between August 23rd and 24th, Ian Linkletter, a learning technology specialist at the University of British Columbia (UBC), made a series of tweets criticizing a software that his school uses.
  • The software was called Proctorio, an online test-proctoring tool that monitors students for suspicious behavior while they take virtual exams.
  • Then, in early September, Linkletter got an unexpected call from a reporter at the Vancouver Sun. Proctorio was suing him for tweeting the videos, as well as a screenshot of its website — the company claimed he’d infringed its copyright and distributed confidential material.
  • Unlike services like Examity and ProctorU, which can put students in front of a live proctor, Proctorio is fully algorithmic, using what its website describes as “machine learning and advanced facial detection technologies.” The software is able to, through a student’s webcam, record them as they work, and monitor the position of their head to track whether they’re looking at their test.

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Trump's Twitter account hacked after Dutch researcher guessed password

  • Donald Trump’s Twitter account was hacked last week, after a Dutch researcher correctly guessed the president’s password: “maga2020!”.
  • Victor Gevers, a security expert, had access to Trump’s direct messages, could post tweets in his name and change his profile, De Volkskrant newspaper reported.
  • Gevers – who previously managed to log into Trump’s account in 2016 – gained access by guessing Trump’s password.
  • Gevers said the ease with which he accessed Trump’s account suggested the president was not using basic security measures like two-step verification.
  • Gaining access to Trump’s Twitter meant Gevers was suddenly able to connect with 87m users – the number of Trump’s followers – and according to De Volkskrant’s story, it sent him into a bit of a panic.
  • A day after he gained access, Gevers noticed that two-step verification had been activated on Trump’s account.
  • In 2016 he and two others guessed Trump’s password and got into his account.

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Quibi failed because it didn't know what people actually want to watch - Business Insider

  • It had commitments from Disney, WarnerMedia, and others that would produce short (less than 10 minutes) video episodes that people could watch during the in-between times that you're riding the subway or waiting in line to check out at the grocery store.
  • Katzenberg said that keeping the company running wasn't going to produce a different, more successful outcome — it would only continue being a money pit without creating any value.
  • On stage at CES, Katzenberg talked about Quibi filling the time people would otherwise look for short, user-generated content on YouTube, but with much higher-quality.
  • That isn't to say anything bad about video creators on YouTube — some of whom are producing incredibly high-quality content — but the average person looking to waste 10 minutes isn't paying a monthly subscription just because your streaming service has higher production values than YouTube and a quirky way to switch between views of your content.

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Quibi failed because it didn't know what people actually want to watch - Business Insider

  • It had commitments from Disney, WarnerMedia, and others that would produce short (less than 10 minutes) video episodes that people could watch during the in-between times that you're riding the subway or waiting in line to check out at the grocery store.
  • Katzenberg said that keeping the company running wasn't going to produce a different, more successful outcome — it would only continue being a money pit without creating any value.
  • On stage at CES, Katzenberg talked about Quibi filling the time people would otherwise look for short, user-generated content on YouTube, but with much higher-quality.
  • That isn't to say anything bad about video creators on YouTube — some of whom are producing incredibly high-quality content — but the average person looking to waste 10 minutes isn't paying a monthly subscription just because your streaming service has higher production values than YouTube and a quirky way to switch between views of your content.

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Quibi founder told staffers to listen to a 'Trolls' song amid layoffs - Business Insider

  • Quibi founder Jeffrey Katzenberg told employees Wednesday to listen to a song from the movie "Trolls" to help lift their spirits amid the company's shutdown.
  • That's according to a report from The Wall Street Journal's Benjamin Mullin, Joe Flint, and Maureen Farrell, who reported on a call Katzenberg held with employees on Wednesday to discuss the shut-down of the company.
  • People familiar with the matter told the Journal that employees will be laid off and paid a severance.
  • The company announced Wednesday that it's shutting down just six months after launch.
  • Katzenberg told investors on Wednesday that Quibi will return $350 million in capital to its investors rather than try to keep the company afloat, the Journal reported.
  • In the letter, Katzenberg and Whitman wrote that in the coming months, they'll look to find buyers for Quibi's original content and its underlying technology platform.

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Quibi founder told staffers to listen to a 'Trolls' song amid layoffs - Business Insider

  • Quibi founder Jeffrey Katzenberg told employees Wednesday to listen to a song from the movie "Trolls" to help lift their spirits amid the company's shutdown.
  • That's according to a report from The Wall Street Journal's Benjamin Mullin, Joe Flint, and Maureen Farrell, who reported on a call Katzenberg held with employees on Wednesday to discuss the shut-down of the company.
  • People familiar with the matter told the Journal that employees will be laid off and paid a severance.
  • The company announced Wednesday that it's shutting down just six months after launch.
  • Katzenberg told investors on Wednesday that Quibi will return $350 million in capital to its investors rather than try to keep the company afloat, the Journal reported.
  • In the letter, Katzenberg and Whitman wrote that in the coming months, they'll look to find buyers for Quibi's original content and its underlying technology platform.

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Email should be obsolete by now, so why are we still using it?

  • I WISH my doorbell would stop emailing me every few hours about how its camera isn’t working.
  • I also wish a certain person would stop sending long-winded, hostile proclamations to one of my favourite email lists.
  • My two wishes bookend the long history of email problems, from irritating listservs 40 years ago to automated notices from inanimate objects today.
  • It is one of the internet’s oldest apps – from the days before we used the word “app” even – and despite its drawbacks, most of us still use it every day.
  • Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.

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Palantir to Help U.S. Track Covid-19 Vaccines

  • is helping the federal government set up a system that will track the manufacture, distribution and administration of Covid-19 vaccines, state and local health officials briefed on the effort said.
  • Palantir has been developing software that federal health officials would use to manage the various vaccine data and identify any issues that could prevent Americans from getting the shots, according to the health officials and materials reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.
  • The system, Tiberius, marks an attempt to use cutting-edge data science to help the federal government manage the work of protecting Americans against Covid-19.
  • State and local health officials who are setting up programs for vaccinating residents said the Tiberius system could further their efforts by, for example, identifying high-priority populations and then allocating shots to health-care workers, the elderly and others at highest risk of infection.

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UPS to Offer Employees a Way to Save for Emergencies

  • is expected to announce Thursday a plan to offer nearly 100,000 of its workers a way to save for emergencies within its 401(k) plan, becoming one of the largest U.S. employers to join a trend that reflects concern over the impact of workers’ financial problems on their ability to retire.
  • The program gives UPS employees the option to divert a portion of their paychecks into rainy-day funds within their 401(k) plans.
  • In recent years, a growing number of employers have grown concerned that if employees are unable to cover unexpected expenses, they may resort to raiding their retirement savings early, said Timothy Flacke, executive director of Commonwealth, a nonprofit that builds tools to help low-income workers save.
  • With financial support from BlackRock Inc.’s foundation, Commonwealth and other nonprofits are working with companies including UPS, Etsy Inc.
  • to develop emergency savings initiatives.

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