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Articles related to "user"


Your Apps Know Where You Were Last Night, and They’re Not Keeping It Secret

  • At least 75 companies receive anonymous, precise location data from apps whose users enable location services to get local news and weather or other information, The Times found.
  • For a web seminar last year, Elina Greenstein, an executive at the location company GroundTruth, mapped out the path of a hypothetical consumer from home to work to show potential clients how tracking could reveal a person’s preferences.
  • Tell All Digital, a Long Island advertising firm that is a client of a location company, says it runs ad campaigns for personal injury lawyers targeting people anonymously in emergency rooms.
  • The Times also identified more than 25 other companies that have said in marketing materials or interviews that they sell location data or services, including targeted advertising.
  • Policies for apps that funnel location information to help investment firms, for instance, have said the data is used for market analysis, or simply shared for business purposes.

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Google has acquired one of India's most popular train tracking apps

  • There’s no official price for the deal, although India’s Economic Times is reporting that it is in the region of $30-$40 million.
  • The deal falls under Google’s ‘Next Billion User’ division which is developing products and services to help increase internet adoption in emerging markets.
  • To date that has focused strongly on India where Google has developed data-friendly ‘lite’ versions of popular apps like YouTube, and initiatives like public WiFi for India’s rail network that’s used by over eight million people.
  • The Where is my Train deal certainly fits that strategy and you’d imagine it’ll become a core part of Google’s consumer-facing product line in India.
  • Facebook, Twitter, Google and even Yahoo have made acquisitions to build teams or acquire talent but Where is my Train seems significantly more strategic as a product.

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Malicious sites abuse 11-year-old Firefox bug that Mozilla failed to fix

  • Malware authors, ad farmers, and scammers are abusing a Firefox bug to trap users on malicious sites.
  • This wouldn't be a big deal, as the web is fraught with this kind of malicious sites, but these websites aren't abusing some new never-before-seen trick, but a Firefox bug that Mozilla engineers appear to have failed to fix in the 11 years ever since it was first reported back in April 2007.
  • Every time the user dismisses it, another request is made, and a new modal appears, effectively keeping the user captive on the malicious sites until they close the browser altogether, and are forced to start a new browsing session.
  • Sure, Mozilla is an open source project, and it doesn't have unlimited resources to handle all the reported issues, but you'd think that after more than 11 years a Firefox engineer would find the time to fix an actively exploited issue.

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A new trove of internal Facebook emails is a stark reminder: You are Facebook’s product

  • The emails, which mostly date from 2012 to 2015, include conversations from Facebook’s top executives about the company’s developer tools and data-sharing practices before widespread changes were made to limit access to some user data in early 2015.
  • But in 2012, Zuckerberg suggested that Facebook charge some outside developers for accessing and collecting data on users through the company’s APIs, software that allows Facebook to share data with other apps.
  • Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica fiasco, in which a third-party research firm gained access to the personal information of tens of millions of Facebook users without their permission, raised a number of questions about the company’s data-sharing policies.
  • You could easily walk away from this email dump and think, “This is just how ruthless businesses work.” That’s true, and Facebook has proven that it is very, very good at making money from the personal information it collects from its users.

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When Your Profiler Lies

  • The trace is zoomed in on the process destruction phase and the ReleaseUserCrit events are selected so that all of the times the UserCrit is released are highlighted as vertical blue lines, and we can clearly see large segments where the lock is not released for long periods of time.
  • We have one piece of evidence (the Microsoft-Windows-Win32k events) saying that the UserCrit is available more than 90% of the time during process destruction, and other pieces of evidence (the MsgCheckDelay) events saying it isn’t.
  • So, if the lock contention on the UserCrit is improved then the next serializing lock is already waiting in the wings – Microsoft really doesn’t want you to create a lot of processes.
  • When I turned off filtering of Microsoft-Windows-Win32k events the ReleaseUserCrit and ExclusiveUserCrit showed up as the second and third biggest contributors to trace size, which nicely justifies my default behavior of filtering them.

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Is there an actual Facebook crisis, or media narrative about Facebook crisis?

  • To me, the story reads a lot like a media narrative that has very little to do with users’s actual lives.
  • Don’t get me wrong: I’m barely a Facebook user and I agree with much of the criticism.
  • I personally think people should read more books and spend less time on Facebook, but I’m a literary boffin type person who would say the same of television.
  • Lots of literary boffin type persons have had the same view of TV since TV came out—you should read more books and watch less TV—but, in the data, people didn’t watch less TV until quite recently, when Facebook started to replace TV.
  • Maybe they’ll find an alternate way to do it (again, I’m not personally a big Facebook user), but if they do, I don’t think it’ll be because of the 5000th media scare story about Facebook.

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Netflix Says Its Biggest Competition Is Sleep. It's Actually YouTube

  • In India, for instance, YouTube reaches 245 million unique users each month, or 85 percent of all internet users in the country, the company told VentureBeat.
  • In Indonesia, YouTube reaches about 74 million active users each month, Google revealed at an event this week, an increase of over 50 percent year-over-year.
  • Globally, YouTube says the number of channels with more than 1 million subscribers has grown by 75 percent this year.
  • Strategy Analytics’ Goodman added that despite all the investment YouTube makes to produce original programming and license movies, it only amounts to a tiny percentage of its total content library.
  • In other words, Netflix and Amazon and 100 other OTT services are not fighting one entity in YouTube, they are competing with millions of content creators.

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Malicious sites abuse 11-year-old Firefox bug that Mozilla failed to fix

  • Malware authors, ad farmers, and scammers are abusing a Firefox bug to trap users on malicious sites.
  • This wouldn't be a big deal, as the web is fraught with this kind of malicious sites, but these websites aren't abusing some new never-before-seen trick, but a Firefox bug that Mozilla engineers appear to have failed to fix in the 11 years ever since it was first reported back in April 2007.
  • For the past few years, malware authors, ad farmers, and scammers have been abusing this bug to lure users on sites where they show all sorts of nasties, such as tech support scams, ad farms that reload the page with new ads in a loop, pages that push users to buy fake gift cards, or sites that offer malware-laced software updates.
  • Every time the user dismisses it, another request is made, and a new modal appears, effectively keeping the user captive on the malicious sites until they close the browser altogether, and are forced to start a new browsing session.

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Netflix’s biggest competition isn’t sleep — it’s YouTube

  • In India, for instance, YouTube reaches 245 million unique users each month, or 85 percent of all internet users in the country, the company told VentureBeat.
  • In Indonesia, YouTube reaches about 74 million active users each month, Google revealed at an event this week, an increase of over 50 percent year-over-year.
  • Globally, YouTube says the number of channels with more than 1 million subscribers has grown by 75 percent this year.
  • Strategy Analytics’ Goodman added that despite all the investment YouTube makes to produce original programming and license movies, it only amounts to a tiny percentage of its total content library.
  • In other words, Netflix and Amazon and 100 other OTT services are not fighting one entity in YouTube, they are competing with millions of content creators.

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Understanding the basics of Ruby on Rails: SQL Databases and how they work

  • Now it’s time to learn about databases and how they connect with Ruby on Rails.
  • We usually use a condition to delete, like “I want to delete all people under 21 years old.” We will learn how later in this post!
  • Now we can use SQL language to query (select, delete, insert, update) data.
  • We now understand the meaning of databases, we’ve tried some basic queries, and have talked about the relationship between tables.
  • So we create a migration (Ruby code), run the rake db:migrate command in the terminal, and it generates a table Authors with first_name, last_name, email, birthday, created_at, and updated_at columns.
  • So when we create a Posts table, we need to store a reference to the post’s author (column author_id in the Posts table).
  • Behind the scenes, it is executing SELECT * FROM posts WHERE title = 'Database & Rails'query.

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