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Articles related to "wired"


How Doug Engelbart Pulled off the Mother of All Demos

  • Bob Taylor: (director of the Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which funded Engelbart's work) There was this proposal called “Augmenting the Human Intellect” by someone at SRI, whom I had never heard of.
  • Engelbart: I got the money to do a research project on trying to test the different kind of display selection devices and that’s when I came up with the idea of mouse.
  • I told them enough so that they got the idea of what I was trying to do and they were essentially telling me, “Maybe it’s better that you don’t tell us.” We had a lot of research money going into it, and I knew that if it really crashed or if somebody really complained, there could be enough trouble that it could blow the whole program.

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Facebook’s and Tumblr’s New Policies Top This Week’s Internet News Roundup

  • What Really Happened: Is it the pressure of the end of the year that is causing Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation to heat up?
  • Ignoring all of the "Who is Scott Free?" jokes—Jack Kirby fans know the answer, anyway—Trump's tweets got a lot of people wondering whether they had just witnessed some witness tampering for real.
  • What Happened: Elsewhere in the Mueller investigation, a sentencing filing for Michael Flynn—who plead guilty to lying to the FBI a year ago—revealed that the special counsel knows a lot of stuff, but he's not quite ready to share just yet.
  • What Really Happened: For all the abuse that the New York Times opinion pages have received over the years, at least they'd never published a piece that basically argued that white Christian people were inherently superior to everyone else … until this week.

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Our 8 Favorite Base Layers to Keep You Warm All Winter Long

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Waymo’s Self-Driving Launch, and More This Week in Cars

  • This week, the WIRED Transportation team highlighted (as we often do) a few exciting developments in self-driving cars.
  • Waymo, the putative leader in the space, finally launched its self-driving car service in metro Phoenix, Arizona.
  • We still don’t know whether the Tesla Model S stopped last month by some quick-thinking cops as its driver snoozed in the front seat was on Autopilot, the electric carmaker’s semi-autonomous highway driving feature.
  • Waymo officially launched its self-driving robotaxi service this week, with some serious caveats.
  • Here’s another company that’s seeing some self-driving success: the small, Michigan-based startup May Mobility, which announced two impending autonomous shuttle launches this week.
  • This week, Senators suddenly began circulating new language for a self-driving car bill that has been in congressional limbo for more than a year.

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A New Quantum Paradox Flags Errors in Our View of Reality

  • The new experiment shows that, in a quantum world, two people can end up disagreeing about a seemingly irrefutable result, such as the outcome of a coin toss, suggesting something is amiss with the assumptions we make about quantum reality.
  • Inside the first lab, Alice’s friend makes a measurement on what is effectively a coin toss designed to come up heads one-third of the time and tails two-thirds of the time.
  • But Alice’s complex measurement puts the lab, friend included, into a superposition of having seen heads and tails.
  • She can deduce using quantum mechanics that Bob’s friend must have found the particle’s spin to be UP, and therefore that Alice’s friend got tails in her coin toss.
  • If Bob gets YES, the measurement is designed to let him conclude that Alice’s friend must have seen heads in her coin toss.

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12 Best Noise-Canceling Headphones for Holiday Gifts and Escapes

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50 Years Later, We Still Don't Grasp the Mother of All Demos

  • Engelbart founded the Augmentation Research Center in the early 1960s with an eye towards helping humanity tackle its biggest problems, such as poverty, disease, and the effects of war, his daughter Christina Engelbart says.
  • Engelbart believed people should focus on creating feedback loops to improve their own effectiveness explains Jeff Rulifson, the computer scientist who developed much of the software on display at the Mother of All Demos.
  • Engelbart's ideas no longer seem so out there, thanks to management philosophies like lean manufacturing and agile software development that encourage companies to make continuous improvements to their products and processes.
  • Open source developers from around the world, often from competing companies, collaborate to build the tools they use to build more tools that they use to solve complex problems, such as building artificial intelligence systems.

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Canada Welcomes AI—But Not All 'Black in AI' Workshop Guests

  • All week, Montreal has played host to 8,000 people attending the NeurIPS conference, which ends Saturday.
  • But well over 100 researchers with tickets to attend the event or its associated workshops, including many who planned to present work, are absent due to visa denials or delays.
  • AI researchers say the visa problems undermine efforts to make their field more inclusive, and less likely to produce technology that discriminates or disadvantages people who aren’t white or Western.
  • Scores of people due to attend or present work at Black in AI, a workshop that took place Friday, were unable to travel to Canada.
  • The visa problems prompting complaints at NeurIPS appear to reflect long-standing challenges for people from certain countries, particularly African, in traveling to Canada.
  • Abebe says visa problems were more apparent this year, in part because of the success of Black in AI and other efforts to widen the pool of people who attend NeurIPS.

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How the CIA Trains Spies to Hide in Plain Sight

  • Despite how easy it looks in James Bond movies and heist flicks, good disguises are hard to pull off.
  • A good wig and some makeup don't make you a new person—full transformation requires a full attitude adjustment.
  • Just ask any contestant on RuPaul's Drag Race.
  • And when you're a spy for the Central Intelligence Agency, being able to execute a perfect disguise can be a matter of life and death.
  • Just ask Jonna Mendez.
  • The CIA can also give a person the ability to do a "quick change." If someone knows they'll be trying to shake a tail, they can change their look as they move through busy sidewalks.
  • Add a hat, change a shirt, add sunglasses, and—if it's done right—it'll look like someone has disappeared.
  • Check out more of Mendez's tricks in the video above and in her Reddit AMA here.

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Tweets Cost Kevin Hart the Oscars. His Apology Made It Worse

  • The 39-year-old actor and comedian deleted many of the messages, including a 2011 tweet in which he wrote that, were his son to play with his daughter's dollhouse, Hart would "break it over his head & say n my voice 'stop that's gay'." But the internet quickly dug up several more crude and cruel statements from his Twitter feed, some of which included terms like "FAT FAG" and jokes about AIDS.
  • By Thursday morning, Hart's Oscar-hosting gig was clearly in jeopardy, though it wasn't necessarily gone for good: A sincere apology—coupled with evidence that he'd matured and learned since those older jokes—possibly could have helped him.
  • I passed on the apology." He also appeared to pin the controversy to "internet trolls." It was an outrageous blunder: Faced with claims that his words had hurt others, Hart didn't bother to listen; instead, he simply lashed out.

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