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Articles related to "worker"


COVID-19: 586 US healthcare workers have died, mostly people of color - Business Insider

  • Almost 600 healthcare workers in the US have died of COVID-19, with a majority being people of color according to a project launched by the Guardian and Kaiser Health News.
  • The project called "Lost on the Frontline" aims to "count, verify, and memorialize" every US healthcare worker who died during the pandemic.
  • Of the numbers they have recorded so far, the Guardian and KHN found that people of color made up the majority of the healthcare workers who died from COVID-19.
  • The database is the most comprehensive count of US health care workers' deaths outside of The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which has only counted 368 coronavirus deaths in the industry so far but has admitted that the tally is an undercount.

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COVID-19: 586 US healthcare workers have died, mostly people of color - Business Insider

  • Almost 600 healthcare workers in the US have died of COVID-19, with a majority being people of color according to a project launched by the Guardian and Kaiser Health News.
  • The project called "Lost on the Frontline" aims to "count, verify, and memorialize" every US healthcare worker who died during the pandemic.
  • Of the numbers they have recorded so far, the Guardian and KHN found that people of color made up the majority of the healthcare workers who died from COVID-19.
  • The database is the most comprehensive count of US health care workers' deaths outside of The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which has only counted 368 coronavirus deaths in the industry so far but has admitted that the tally is an undercount.

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American Capitalism Is Brutal. You Can Trace That to the Plantation

  • In the United States, the richest 1 percent of Americans own 40 percent of the country’s wealth, while a larger share of working-age people (18-65) live in poverty than in any other nation belonging to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (O.E.C.D.).
  • But recently, historians have pointed persuasively to the gnatty fields of Georgia and Alabama, to the cotton houses and slave auction blocks, as the birthplace of America’s low-road approach to capitalism.
  • What made the cotton economy boom in the United States, and not in all the other far-flung parts of the world with climates and soil suitable to the crop, was our nation’s unflinching willingness to use violence on nonwhite people and to exert its will on seemingly endless supplies of land and labor.
  • The United States solved its land shortage by expropriating millions of acres from Native Americans, often with military force, acquiring Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Florida.

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Coles activist calls for ACTU to exit IR talks

  • The ruling led to the restoration of full penalty rates for tens of thousands of workers but saw bargaining limbo among major retail and fast-food companies and was a key contributor to the sharp decline in enterprise agreements since 2013.
  • But Mr Hart, a long-time SDA activist looking to change the union from within, said workers should be sceptical of employer calls to change the BOOT to encourage wage growth and productivity.
  • Retail and Fast Food Workers Union secretary Josh Cullinan, who represented Mr Hart in the Coles hearing, last week denounced the IR talks as all about the BOOT and warned that his members were preparing to "sharpen our pitchforks" over any changes.
  • Mr Hart said in fact he did not support the enterprise agreement system, introduced by the Keating government to encourage firm-level wage growth and productivity, and would prefer sector-wide bargaining.

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Amazon warehouse workers sue over risk of COVID-19 infection

  • A group of three Amazon warehouse employees who work out of the company’s New York fulfillment centers have filed a lawsuit alleging the company put them and their families at risk of COVID-19 infection, according to a report from Bloomberg.
  • The complaint accuses Amazon of fostering a work environment in which employees “were explicitly or implicitly encouraged to continue attending work and prevented from adequately washing their hands or sanitizing their workstations.” It also claims the company, through quotas and disciplinary action, led workers to avoid social distancing and other safety measures to continue hitting metrics and to keep up with surging demand.
  • The lawsuit also alleges that Amazon has taken a lax approach to contact tracing investigations to try and determine which employees may have come into contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19, and that the company has punished workers for speaking out about safety concerns.

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Amazon cuts workers' $2 hazard pay as coronavirus continues spread - Business Insider

  • The coronavirus pandemic is not over, but Amazon this week ended some of the emergency incentives it introduced to encourage its 250,000 warehouse staffers to come into work.
  • On Monday, Amazon eliminated one of the policies brought in to reward frontline workers for continuing to come into work during the crisis — a $2-per-hour rise in pay.
  • Several Amazon warehouse workers who spoke to Business Insider said the pay cut won't make much difference to their livelihoods.
  • As coronavirus cases spread to the US, Amazon began to notify workers about cases in their warehouses via text, telling them when a worker who tested positive for COVID-19 was last on-site.
  • One California worker told Business Insider they received a text on May 18 notifying them a confirmed case had been on-site on April 7.

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Amazon cuts workers' $2 hazard pay as coronavirus continues spread - Business Insider

  • The coronavirus pandemic is not over, but Amazon this week ended some of the emergency incentives it introduced to encourage its 250,000 warehouse staffers to come into work.
  • On Monday, Amazon eliminated one of the policies brought in to reward frontline workers for continuing to come into work during the crisis — a $2-per-hour rise in pay.
  • Several Amazon warehouse workers who spoke to Business Insider said the pay cut won't make much difference to their livelihoods.
  • As coronavirus cases spread to the US, Amazon began to notify workers about cases in their warehouses via text, telling them when a worker who tested positive for COVID-19 was last on-site.
  • One California worker told Business Insider they received a text on May 18 notifying them a confirmed case had been on-site on April 7.

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LA woman receives backlash for posing with drill amid protests - Insider

  • On Monday, Twitter user @ewufortheloss posted a video of a woman borrowing a drill from a construction worker boarding up a storefront in Santa Monica.
  • New York Times technology reporter Taylor Lorenz identified the woman as Fiona Moriarty-McLaughlin, whose Twitter bio described her as a "Commentary" journalist with the Washington Examiner and former employee Billboard and The Hollywood Reporter.
  • Several other commenters, some of whom claimed to know the woman pictured, identified Moriarty-McLaughlin and tagged the Washington Examiner in their tweets.
  • Since the video went viral, Moriarty-McLaughlin's Twitter profile appears to have been deleted and her Instagram has been set to private.
  • On Sunday, Insider reported, Moriarty-McLaughlin filmed a protester in Los Angeles spray-painting "Black Lives Matter!" across a billboard for haircare brand Ouai.
  • Atkin even went on to post a photo of the billboard on Instagram.

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IBM, the Silent Job Cutter, Stokes Worker Anxiety, Speculation

  • Olivia Carville (Bloomberg) -- IBM’s new chief executive officer, Arvind Krishna, has continued an unusual company tradition, refusing to disclose the scale of its latest round of job cuts.
  • Internal battles often arise between company executives, the human resources department and public relations office over how much information to share on job cuts, said Jonathan Segal, a partner at Duane Morris LLP.
  • Under federal law, corporations must notify regional Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification offices about plans to cut jobs, but there’s a lot of leeway for companies to avoid WARN filings.
  • IBM’s secrecy about job cuts is still guided by the experience under Gerstner in the 1990s when extra transparency resulted in negative media coverage, employee outrage and litigation, according to a former executive who asked not to be identified discussing private information.

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Walmart employees are out to show its anti-shoplifting AI doesn’t work

  • In an effort to refute the claims made in the Business Insider piece, the Concerned Home Office Associates created a video, which purports to show Everseen’s technology failing to flag items not being scanned in three different Walmart stores.
  • In interviews, the workers, whose jobs include knowledge of Walmart’s loss-prevention programs, said their top concern with Everseen was false positives at self-checkout.
  • One Concerned Home Office Associate said they worry false positives could be causing Walmart workers to break social-distancing guidelines unnecessarily.
  • In an internal communication from April obtained by WIRED, a corporate Walmart manager expressed strong concern that workers were being put at risk by the additional contact necessitated by false positives and asked whether the Everseen system should be turned off to protect customers and workers.

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